BCP DRAFT LIT 104

First Grade - Literature - Aesop's Fables Overview

The Boy Who Cried Wolf

The Dog in the Manger

The Wolf in Sheep's Clothing

The Maid and the Milk Pail

The Fox and the Grapes

The Goose That Laid the Golden Eggs

The fables listed above are the six that are studied this month. Before beginning to read the stories take some time to tell about the author and locate the country where he lived (see Procedure below). Within the studies of the fables "The Fox and the Grapes" and "The Wolf in Sheep's Clothing" you will discuss the idioms sour grapes and wolf in sheep's clothing. Be sure to write these out and display them in your classroom.

For your convenience, several books of fables are listed with an annotation as to the particular ones included. Please note that only two of the books include all the fables listed above.

Special Note

Kindergarten Core Knowledge introduces the following Aesop's Fables:

"The Lion and the Mouse"

"The Grasshopper and the Ants"

"The Dog and His Shadow" ("The Dog and His Reflection")

"The Hare and the Tortoise"

as well as the story

"King Midas and the Magic Touch"

References to these stories in the first grade lessons are prefaced with an asterisk (*) so additional connections may be made if the students are familiar with the stories.

Procedure

Tell the students that Aesop was a man who lived in Greece many years ago. Locate Greece on a map and explain that the country is made up of land attached to the huge land mass of Europe, and several islands. Some books say that Aesop was a slave who was able to win his freedom because he entertained his owner with the clever stories that he told. Explain that long ago when Aesop lived there were many wars. The people who won the war often made slaves of the people who lost the war.

Aesop told stories which we call fables. These fables tell about the way he saw people behaving, but he used animals as the characters in his stories instead of people. This way people could learn lessons without getting angry about what they were being told. Can you think of other stories you have heard which used animals in place of people? (Brer Rabbit stories)

Aesop's stories were not written down until many years after his death. We are not sure if the stories we read today are just the way Aesop told them or if the writers changed them somehow.

At the end of some of the stories there is a statement that we call a moral or lesson. Other versions have the idea of the moral within the story. As you listen to the stories and the morals, they will probably remind you of something else we have learned about this year (sayings and proverbs).

BCP DRAFT LIT 105

First Grade - Literature - Aesop's Fables - Overview

Some activites that you may choose to do with any of the fables are:

Perform a play or mime the actions of the fable.

Do a puppet show.

Read several versions of the same fable and compare and contrast.

Illustrate a fable or make a booklet of fables.

Identify the lesson or moral and relate it to other literature or life situations.

Anno, Mitsumasa, retold and illus. by. Anno's Aesop: A Book of Fables by Aesop and Mr. Fox. New York: Orchard Books, 1989.

Wonderful choice for introducing fables; the parallel story told by Mr. Fox will be of interest to the students as well.

Contains "The Fox and the Grapes," "The Boy Who Cried Wolf," and "The Goose That Laid the Golden Eggs."

Barnes-Murphy, Frances, retold by. The Fables of Aesop. New York: Lothrop, Lee & Shepard, 1994.

Wonderful illuminations and clever drawings; morals are not included.

Contains all.

Calmenson, Stephanie, retold by. The Children's Aesop. Honesdale, PA: Boyds Mills Press, 1988.

Colorful illustrations by Robert Byrd highlight each fable.

Contains all but "The Maid and the Milk Pail."

 

Clark, Margery, retold by. The Best of Aesop's Fables. Boston: Little, Brown and Co., 1990.

Wonderful illustrations by Charlotte Voake; told without morals to "dispel altogether the 'preacherly' tone."

Contains all but "The Maid and the Milk Pail" and "The Goose That Laid the Golden Eggs."

Galdone, Paul, retold by. Three Aesop Fox Fables. New York: Seabury Press, 1971.

Simple illustrations with morals included.

Contains "The Fox and the Grapes" only.

Gatti, Anne, retold by. Aesop's Fables. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co.,1992.

Delicate illustrations by Safaya Salter; moral included with each fable.

Contains "Dog in the Manger" only.



BCP DRAFT LIT 106

First Grade - Literature - Aesop's Fables - Overview

Hague, Michael, selected and illustrated by. Aesop's Fables. New York: Holt, Rhinehart and Winston, 1985.

Intricate illustrations; morals are included.

Contains only "The Fox and the Grapes."

Hirsch, E.D. Jr., ed. What Your First Grader Needs to Know (Revised Edition). New York: Doubleday, 1997.

Contains all six fables as well as a play based on "The Boy Who Cried Wolf."

Mathias, Robert, retold by. Aesop's Fables. Morristown: Silver Burdett, 1983.

Fifty-nine fables and their morals included; illustrated with color drawings by David Frankland and line drawings by Meg Rutherford.

Contains all but "The Goose That Laid the Golden Eggs."

Paxton, Tom, retold in verse by. Aesop's Fables. New York: Morrow Junior, 1988.

Interesting presentation with beautiful illustrations by Robert Rayevsky; moral included in the tale.

Contains "The Goose That Laid the Golden Eggs," "The Fox and the Grapes," and "The Dog in the Manger."

Santore, Charles, retold and illus. by. Aesop's Fables. New York: Jelly Bean Press, 1988.

Colorful full-page art, morals are not included.

Contains "Wolf in Sheep's Clothing" and "The Fox and the Grapes."

Testa, Fuvio, retold and illus. by. Aesop's Fables. New York: Barron's, 1989.

Colorful illustrations, morals are not included.

"The Fox and the Grapes" only.

Thuswaldner, Werner, retold by. Aesop's Fables. New York: North-South Books, 1994.

Interesting pencil illustrations by Gisela Durr.

Contains "The Young Shepherd and the Wolf" and "The Goose Who Laid Golden Eggs"

Copycat May/June 96 "V is for Virtue" pp. 14-21.

Aesop's Fables are briefly discussed within the context of teaching values.

The Good Apple Newspaper March/April 1997 "A Lesson to Be Learned-A Unit Based on Aesop's Fables" pp. 38-42.

May be useful in thinking of different ways to present Aesop's Fables.

BCP DRAFT LIT 107

First Grade - Literature - Aesop's Fables - The Boy Who Cried Wolf

Objective

Identify possible consequences of trickery.

Materials

Copy of the fable

Suggested Books

Anno, Mitsumasa, retold and illus. by. Anno's Aesop: A Book of Fables by Aesop and Mr. Fox. New York: Orchard Books, 1989.

Wonderful choice for introducing fables; the parallel story told by Mr. Fox will be of interest to the students as well.

 

Barnes-Murphy, Frances, retold by. The Fables of Aesop. New York: Lothrop, Lee & Shepard, 1994.

Wonderful illuminations and clever drawings; morals are not included.

 

Calmenson, Stephanie, retold by. The Children's Aesop. Honesdale, PA: Boyds Mills Press, 1988.

Colorful illustrations by Robert Byrd highlight each fable.

 

Clark, Margery, retold by. The Best of Aesop's Fables. Boston: Little, Brown and Co., 1990.

Wonderful illustrations by Charlotte Voake; told without morals to "dispel altogether the 'preacherly' tone."

Hirsch, E.D. Jr., ed. What Your First Grader Needs to Know. New York: Doubleday, 1997.

All six fables as well as a play based on "The Boy Who Cried Wolf" are included.

Mathias, Robert, retold by. Aesop's Fables. Morristown: Silver Burdett, 1983.

Fifty-nine fables and their morals included; illustrated with color drawings by David Frankland and line drawings by Meg Rutherford.

 

Thuswaldner, Werner, retold by. Aesop's Fables. New York: North-South Books, 1994.

Interesting pencil illustrations by Gisela Durr.

 

Teacher Background

"The Boy Who Cried Wolf" is one of the best known fables and lends itself to student participation in the forms of performance or puppet play. In addition, attention should be given to this fable so that students can recognize how serious the outcome of trickery can be. You may want to relate this fable and trickery to the dangers of hiding to fool someone into thinking you are missing, or telling tales about another person in order to tease that person. The repetition of the trick certainly forms the basis for this tale, but a single instance of trickery can have disastrous results and you may want to take this opportunity for that discussion.

BCP DRAFT LIT 108

First Grade - Literature - Aesop's Fables - The Boy Who Cried Wolf

Procedure

Tell the students that you are going to read a fable called "The Boy Who Cried Wolf." Ask the students if they have ever seen a wolf anywhere other than in the zoo or in a photograph

or movie. Tell the students that if they lived out in the country far away from the city they might see a wolf as well as many other animals that we do not usually see in places where many people are living. People who raise animals on ranches far away from the city have to worry that their animals might be attacked and killed by wild animals. Because of this someone needs to guard the animals. Ask the children to name some animals that would be raised in this manner, like sheep, goats, cattle, horses, chickens, etc.

Many years ago, when Aesop would have told these stories, there were a lot of sheep being raised. The people who raised sheep and guarded them while the flock was out grazing were, and are still today, called shepherds. (Be sure that the students know that flock is the name given to the group of sheep, and graze means to eat grass.) When Aesop told his stories shepherds were especially important because they were needed to protect the sheep, which were a main source for food, and their wool was used to make yarn for weaving cloth. The job was important and when the shepherd called for help because a wild animal was attacking, all the people of the town or village would come.

Tell the students that in this fable the shepherd is a boy. Ask them to listen to the fable and then tell whether they think this boy took his job seriously. Read the fable.

When you have completed the reading ask the children to tell in their own words, what happened in the fable. If you have selected a retelling that does not include the moral you may wish to ask the students if they can think of some advice that we get from this story. Ask the children to tell why the shepherd boy's actions were really dangerous. If you choose to relate the fable to present life situations this would be a good time. You could also tell the students that sometimes we say someone is "crying wolf." Ask them what they think this means. Tell them that this is what we say about someone who continues to say they have a problem and need help when they really don't.

You may wish to have students do a brief skit of this fable or use puppets to retell the story. The 1997 Revised Edition of What Your First Grader Needs to Know ( E.D. Hirsch, Jr., New York: Doubleday, 1997) contains a play "The Boy Who Cried Wolf" that has seven characters.

 

BCP DRAFT LIT 109

First Grade - Literature - Aesop's Fables - The Dog in the Manger

Objective

Relate the selfishness of the dog to other situations.

Decide which proverb would be good advice for the dog.

Materials

A copy of the fable

Proverbs and sayings posted in the classroom

Suggested Books

Barnes-Murphy, Frances, retold by. The Fables of Aesop. New York: Lothrop, Lee & Shepard, 1994.

Wonderful illuminations and clever drawings; morals are not included.

 

Calmenson, Stephanie, retold by. The Children's Aesop. Honesdale, PA: Boyds Mills Press, 1988.

Colorful illustrations by Robert Byrd highlight each fable.

 

Clark, Margery, retold by. The Best of Aesop's Fables. Boston: Little, Brown and Co., 1990.

Wonderful illustrations by Charlotte Voake; told without morals to "dispel altogether the 'preacherly' tone."

 

Gatti, Anne, retold by. Aesop's Fables. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co.,1992.

Delicate illustrations by Safaya Salter; moral included with each fable.

 

Hirsch, E.D. Jr., ed. What Your First Grader Needs to Know. New York: Doubleday, 1997.

All six fables as well as a play based on "The Boy Who Cried Wolf" are included.

Procedure

Begin this lesson by telling the students that the fable you are about to read is called "The Dog in the Manger." Ask if anyone knows what a manger is. It is possible that someone will be familiar with the song "Away in a Manger." Explain that a manger is a wooden rectangular container used to hold hay or feed for animals to eat. It can be raised up on legs and placed in front of a large animal like a cow or horse so that they can easily reach their food. Mangers are not used very often today because we have better materials and containers to use.

Repeat the title and ask the students what they think a dog might be doing in a manger. Allow a few moments for speculation. Tell the children to listen to the fable to see if they are right and to decide whether the story gives a good or bad reason for the dog to be there. Read the fable.

When you have finished reading, ask the students if they think the dog was being kind or mean. Ask also if they know anyone who has ever acted the same way as the dog. Ask if they can think of a time when they, or someone else, kept another person from using a particular thing

when they really didn't need or want that item themselves. Say: Did the dog want what was in the manger? Did the dog have a good reason for keeping the food from the horse? Ask the

BCP DRAFT LIT 110

First Grade - Literature - Aesop's Fables - The Dog in the Manger

students if they can think of a word to describe the dog (selfish, greedy).

Tell the students to think about the proverbs and sayings they have learned this year. Take a few minutes to read through them if necessary. Ask for a volunteer to say which one would be good advice for the dog. (Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.) Have the student explain why that would be good advice.

BCP DRAFT LIT 111

First Grade - Literature - Aesop's Fables -The Wolf in Sheep's Clothing

Objective

Explain and relate wolf in sheep's clothing.

Relate to other wolves in literature.

Materials

A copy of the fable

Wolf in sheep's clothing written on sentence strip

Suggested Books

Barnes-Murphy, Frances, retold by. The Fables of Aesop. New York: Lothrop, Lee & Shepard, 1994.

Wonderful illuminations and clever drawings; morals are not included.

 

Hirsch, E.D. Jr., ed. What Your First Grader Needs to Know. New York: Doubleday, 1997.

All six fables as well as a play based on "The Boy Who Cried Wolf" are included.

Santore, Charles, retold and illus. by. Aesop's Fables. New York: Jelly Bean Press, 1988.

Colorful full page art, morals are not included.

 

Procedure

Have the students recall "The Boy Who Cried Wolf." Ask: Why did the boy guard the sheep? (danger of wolf attack) What would a wolf do if it got one of the sheep? (kill and eat it) Ask the students to think about how a wolf would get to the sheep. How would it have to move? Say: The title of the next fable we'll read is "The Wolf in Sheep's Clothing." What do you think is going to happen in this fable? How would a wolf wear sheep's clothing?

Read the fable. Ask: What did the wolf do? (covered himself with a sheepskin) What happened as a result? (The wolf was able to trick a lamb into becoming his dinner, but then he became dinner for the shepherd.) Did good things happen to the wolf who pretended to be something he was not?

Ask: What do you think Aesop was trying to tell us when the wolf was killed? (If you pretend to be something that you are not, you might get caught.) Is it a good idea to pretend to be something that you are not? (no)

Do you think there is another message in this story? What can be learned by the way the sheep were fooled? Remind the students that in this fable the wolf appeared to be a sheep, but he really was not. Explain that sometimes people appear to be kind and friendly when they are not. Briefly discuss the dangers that can occur from trusting someone you don't know. Remind the students that sometimes a person who wants to harm you will be very kind in order to get you to not suspect that anything is wrong. Sometimes people will pretend to be a friend in order to get something from you or take advantage of you. We call that kind of person a "wolf in sheep's clothing." Just like the sheep, we should be careful because things and people are not always what they seem.

Ask the students to think of another story they have read that tells about a wolf pretending to be something he was not (Red-Riding Hood, Lon Po Po). Did good things happen BCP DRAFT LIT 112

First Grade - Literature - Aesop's Fables - The Wolf in Sheep's Clothing

to the wolves in those stories? Did Red-Riding Hood trust the wolf dressed as Grandma? Did the girls trust the wolf pretending to be the grandmother?

Post the idiom wolf in sheep's clothing. Ask the students to be on the lookout for other examples that illustrate this saying. Students may be able to draw parallels to characters in movies they have seen, also. Help them to recognize that a disguise doesn't need to be worn; rather, it is the behavior that truly identifies a "wolf in sheep's clothing."

 

BCP DRAFT LIT 113

First Grade - Literature - Aesop's Fables - The Maid and the Milk Pail

Objective

Relate "Don't count your chickens before they are hatched" to other life experiences.

Materials

Copy of the fable

Suggested Books

Barnes-Murphy, Frances, retold by. The Fables of Aesop. New York: Lothrop, Lee & Shepard, 1994.

Wonderful illuminations and clever drawings; morals are not included.

 

Hirsch, E.D. Jr., ed. What Your First Grader Needs to Know. New York: Doubleday, 1997.

All six fables as well as a play based on "The Boy Who Cried Wolf" are included.

Procedure

Remind the students that Aesop told his fables many years ago. Tell them that long ago people would go to the market to sell their products. People might sell vegetables or fruit, animals, clothing and jewelry that they made, and as in this fable, products made from milk.

Remind the students that long ago and even today, people in some parts of our world place heavy things they need to carry on their heads. They learn to balance the object and have their hands free. Since the milkmaid in this fable probably carried a pail of milk on her head every day, she was probably so very good at this that it was easy to forget that the pail was even there.

Read "The Maid and the Milk Pail" and then ask for student volunteers to tell what happened. Ask: Was the milkmaid thinking about what she was doing? What was she thinking about? Ask the children if they have ever heard the word daydreaming. The milkmaid was daydreaming about what could happen and forgetting to think about what was happening.

Reread the moral and ask the students to tell what "Don't count your chickens before they are hatched" means. If they have difficulty coming up with an explanation you might ask the following questions: Ask: What do chickens hatch from? (eggs) Can you tell if there is a chicken growing in the egg just by looking at it? (no) If you count the eggs can you be sure that you'll have the same number of chickens? (no) If you did, you would be planning on something that might not happen. Did the milkmaid make plans about something that she wasn't even sure would happen? (yes)

Ask: Have you ever made plans about something and it didn't happen? Did you ever walk home from school thinking about having a cooky and a glass of milk and how good they would taste, only to find out when you got home that your little brother had eaten all the cookies? In your imagination the cookies and milk seemed so real that you could almost taste them. You were really disappointed when there weren't any cookies there.

Have you ever made plans to go to an amusement park with a friend? You plan all the rides that you'll get on, what you'll eat, and all the fun you'll have. Then it rains on the day that you are supposed to go to the park. You and your friend are really disappointed.

Aesop used the example of the milkmaid and her pail to tell us not to plan on getting or doing something so much that we get disappointed when it doesn't happen.

Remind the students that Aesop told his fables to adults. Sometimes grown-ups make plans and they don't happen either.

BCP DRAFT LIT 114

First Grade - Literature - Aesop's Fables - The Fox and the Grapes

Objective

Relate sour grapes to life experiences.

Pantomime the actions of the fox.

Materials

Copy of the fable, several versions if possible

A bunch of grapes (real or artificial)

Sour grapes written on sentence strip

Suggested Books

Anno, Mitsumasa, retold and illus. by. Anno's Aesop: A Book of Fables by Aesop and Mr. Fox. New York: Orchard Books, 1989.

Wonderful choice for introducing fables; the parallel story told by Mr. Fox will be of interest to the students as well.

 

Barnes-Murphy, Frances, retold by. The Fables of Aesop. New York: Lothrop, Lee & Shepard, 1994.

Wonderful illuminations and clever drawings; morals are not included.

 

Calmenson, Stephanie, retold by. The Children's Aesop. Honesdale, PA: Boyds Mills Press, 1988.

Colorful illustrations by Robert Byrd highlight each fable.

 

Clark, Margery, retold by. The Best of Aesop's Fables. Boston: Little, Brown and Co., 1990.

Wonderful illustrations by Charlotte Voake; told without morals to "dispel altogether the 'preacherly' tone."

 

Galdone, Paul, retold by. Three Aesop Fox Fables. New York: Seabury Press, 1971.

Simple illustrations with morals included.

Hague, Michael, selected and illustrated by. Aesop's Fables. New York: Holt, Rhinehart and Winston, 1985.

Intricate illustrations; morals are included.

Hirsch, E.D. Jr., ed. What Your First Grader Needs to Know. New York: Doubleday, 1997.

All six fables as well as a play based on "The Boy Who Cried Wolf" are included.

Mathias, Robert, retold by. Aesop's Fables. Morristown: Silver Burdett, 1983.

Fifty-nine fables and their morals included; illustrated with color drawings by David Frankland and line drawings by Meg Rutherford.

 

Paxton, Tom, retold in verse by. Aesop's Fables. New York: Morrow Junior, 1988.

Interesting presentation with beautiful illustrations by Robert Rayevsky; moral included in the tale.

BCP DRAFT LIT 115

First Grade - Literature - Aesop's Fables - The Fox and the Grapes

 

Santore, Charles, retold and illus. by. Aesop's Fables. New York: Jelly Bean Press, 1988.

Colorful full page art, morals are not included.

 

Testa, Fuvio, retold and illus. by. Aesop's Fables. New York: Barron's, 1989.

Colorful illustrations, morals are not included.

 

Procedure

Tell the students that "The Fox and the Grapes" is one of Aesop's best known fables. If possible, show a number of books that contain the fable.

Before reading be certain that all students are familiar with grapes growing in a bunch and the kind of vine they grow on. If necessary, draw a sketch on the chalkboard of the vine and grapes. Ask the students what they think the fox will want to do with the grapes. Ask them what they like to do with grapes.

Read the fable, first telling the students to listen to see if the fox gets to eat his grapes.

After reading the fable ask the students if the fox was able to get the grapes. Ask: How do you think the fox really felt? Do you think that the fox really thought that the grapes were sour? Why do you think he said that?

Tell the students that sometimes when we are disappointed we say things so that others don't know how we really feel. Someone might say that they really didn't want to play anyway when they are not allowed to join a game. Another person might make fun of the clothes or toys that belong to someone else because they secretly wish that they had the same thing. A person who can't afford to go to a movie with friends might say that the movie isn't any good. When people do these things we say "sour grapes." These people are just like the fox: since they can't have a particular thing they say that it isn't any good, or they didn't want it.

Post the idiom "sour grapes" and tell the students that they may read about characters in books acting this way as well. Tell them to be on the lookout.

You may wish to have the students pantomime the actions of the fox in this fable. Have the students move to an open area, or have them stand behind their desks with chairs pushed in. Have them begin by walking in place at a leisurely rate; then have them spy the grapes (hand shielding eyes, sudden stop); next, have the students look at the grapes hungrily (rub stomach, smack lips); have the students leap up and try to get the grapes (remind students that the fox could only use his teeth, no hands); after several tries have the students reject the grapes with a wag of the hand and begin walking in place once again.

If you brought in enough grapes to share with the class, they would make a perfect reward for a job well done.

BCP DRAFT LIT 116

First Grade - Literature - Aesop's Fables - The Goose That Laid the Golden Eggs

Objective

Identify greed as the cause of the goose's death.

Materials

A copy of the fable

Suggested Books

Anno, Mitsumasa, retold and illus. by. Anno's Aesop: A Book of Fables by Aesop and Mr. Fox. New York: Orchard Books, 1989.

Wonderful choice for introducing fables; the parallel story told by Mr. Fox will be of interest to the students as well.

 

Barnes-Murphy, Frances, retold by. The Fables of Aesop. New York: Lothrop, Lee & Shepard, 1994.

Wonderful illuminations and clever drawings; morals are not included.

 

Calmenson, Stephanie, retold by. The Children's Aesop. Honesdale, PA: Boyds Mills Press, 1988.

Colorful illustrations by Robert Byrd highlight each fable.

 

Hirsch, E.D. Jr., ed. What Your First Grader Needs to Know. New York: Doubleday, 1997.

All six fables as well as a play based on "The Boy Who Cried Wolf" are included.

Paxton, Tom, retold in verse by. Aesop's Fables. New York: Morrow Junior, 1988.

Interesting presentation with beautiful illustrations by Robert Rayevsky; moral included in the tale.

 

Thuswaldner, Werner, retold by. Aesop's Fables. New York: North-South Books, 1994.

Interesting pencil illustrations by Gisela Durr.

 

Procedure

Begin the lesson by asking the students to tell what they know about gold. Be certain that as a result of your discussion, the students know that gold is a very precious metal that is valued by its weight; the heavier a gold object is, the more value it has. Tell the students that long ago people used gold in the same way that we use money. If someone had a lot of gold they were considered to be very rich.

Tell the students that the next fable they will hear is called "The Goose That Laid the Golden Eggs." Say: Can you imagine what it would be like to own that goose? Suppose you had a goose that laid golden eggs, how would you take care of it? Let's see what this owner does.

Read the fable. Ask the students to retell the story in their own words. Ask them to give a word to describe the owner (greedy). What do you think Aesop was trying to tell us about being greedy?

Remind the children that when someone is greedy they don't think about anything other BCP DRAFT LIT 117

First Grade - Literature - Aesop's Fables - The Goose That Laid the Golden Eggs

than getting more or all of a particular thing. Then when people behave in a greedy way something bad usually happens. For instance, people may be so greedy about food that they eat so much that they get sick, or they may want certain things so much that they steal. In this fable the owner was so greedy that he killed the goose in order to get more gold. Can you think of other stories you know that have characters who are greedy?

* Ask: Do you remember what happened to the greedy dog who saw his reflection in the water?

(opened his mouth to growl at his reflection and dropped his bone into the water) What happened to King Midas because he was so greedy for gold? (He turned his daughter Marygold into a golden statue.)

What advice do you think the owner of the goose would give to people who always wanted more? Accept all reasonable responses the students make and suggest that the owner might advise people to be happy with what they have.

* Denotes material from Kindergarten lessons

Additional Activity

As a culmination to the study of Aesop's Fables, you may wish to do the following activity. Have each student select his or her favorite Aesop's Fables moral or wisdom, copy it onto a piece of lined paper, and attach it to an illustration appropriate for that fable.