BCP DRAFT MUS 17



Baltimore Curriculum Project Draft Lessons

Introductory Notes

These lessons generally follow the grade-by-grade topics in the Core Knowledge Sequence, but they have been developed independent of the Core Knowledge Foundation. While the Core Knowledge Foundation encourages the development and sharing of lessons based on the Core Knowledge Sequence, it does not endorse any one set of lesson plans as the best or only way that the knowledge in the Sequence should be taught.

You may feel free to download and distribute these lessons, but please note that they are currently in DRAFT form. At this time the draft lessons on this web site do NOT have accompanying graphics, such as maps or cut-out patterns. Graphics will be added to this site later.

In participating BCP schools, these lessons are used in conjunction with the Direct Instruction skills programs in reading, language, and math. If you use or adapt these lessons, keep in mind that they are meant to address content and the application of skills. You will need to use other materials to ensure that children master skills in reading, language, and math.

First Grade - Lesson 7 - Songs

Objectives

Learn to sing two American songs.

Play a game with a song.

Materials

Words to "Skip to My Lou" and "Oh, Susanna" printed below

Note to the Teacher

There is only one formal music lesson this month, because the children have learned about the opera Haensel and Gretel in a literature lesson for December; the music and words for two extra songs are given in the American Civilization section plus two selections from Handel's Messiah and The Little Drummer Boy.

Skip to My Lou

This American folk song is good for a singing game, since the words are so simple and repetitive. There is essentially one new line for each verse, making it easy for the children to memorize the words quickly. If there is enough space in the room, try having the children do a traditional circle game as they sing the song.

1. Children form a single circle; one child stands in the middle.

2. As the singing starts, the child in the middle chooses a partner, and the two of them skip inside the circle, keeping time to the meter of the song, while the others sing and clap. At the last line of the Chorus begins, the first child joins the circle, leaving the second child in the middle.

3. Verse 1 - The child in the middle skips around alone, while the others sing and clap. At the last line of the verse, he/she picks a partner.

4. Repeat Chorus - Both skip and the first child goes back to the circle at the last line of the chorus.

5. Verses 2-6: The action of Verse 1 is repeated for each, always followed by the Chorus with its same action. The children around the circle could pantomime the activities of each verse for variety of movement, and they could improvise new verses to prolong the game.

Chorus

Lou, Lou, skip to my Lou,

Lou, Lou, skip to my Lou,

Lou, Lou, skip to my Lou,

Skip to my Lou, my darling.

Verse 1

Lost my partner, What'll I do?

Lost my partner, What'll I do?

Lost my partner, What'll I do?

Skip to my Lou, my darling.

BCP DRAFT MUS 18

First Grade - Lesson 7 - Songs

Verse 2

I'll get another one, prettier than you,

I'll get another one, prettier than you,

I'll get another one, prettier than you,

Skip to my Lou, my darling.

Verse 3

Gone again, skip to my Lou,

Gone again, skip to my Lou,

Gone again, skip to my Lou,

Skip to my Lou, my darling.

Verse 4

Fly's in the buttermilk, shoo, shoo, shoo,

Fly's in the buttermilk, shoo, shoo, shoo,

Fly's in the buttermilk, shoo, shoo, shoo,

Skip to my Lou, my darling.

Verse 5

A little red wagon, painted blue,

A little red wagon, painted blue,

A little red wagon, painted blue,

Skip to my Lou, my darling.

Oh, Susanna - music and words by Stephen Foster

Background for Teacher

Stephen Collins Foster wrote songs that sounded like folk songs, but in fact they were written down and published as soon as he conceived them. This one is a kind of a nonsense song (like "Clementine"), first heard in Pittsburgh at the Eagle Ice Cream Parlor in 1847 when Foster was only 21 yrs old. In 1849, the '49ers' caught on to the bouncy rhythms (which are indeed regular and perfect for banjo or guitar accompaniment) and brought the song with them to the Gold Rush. For a time it was the most popular song in America. Foster wrote about two hundred other songs, inluding "Beautiful Dreamer," "I Dream of Jeannie with the Light Brown Hair," "Swanee River," and "Camptown Races."



I come from Alabama with my banjo on my knee,

I'm going to Louisiana, My Susanna for to see.

Chorus

Oh, Susanna! Oh, don't you cry for me,

For I come from Alabama with my banjo on my knee.

BCP DRAFT MUS 19

First Grade - Lesson 7 - Songs

It rained all day the night I left, The weather it was dry,

The sun so hot I froze to death, Susanna don't you cry.

Chorus

I had a dream the other night, When everything was still.

I thought I saw Susanna, A-coming down the hill.

Chorus

The buckwheat cake was in her mouth, The tear was in her eye,

Says I, "I'm coming from the South." Susanna don't you cry.

Chorus