BCP DRAFT LIT 73

First Grade - Literature - Sayings and Phrases - February

Never leave till tomorrow what you can do today.

Read the saying Never leave till tomorrow what you can do today to the students and ask if anyone can explain what it means. If no one volunteers an answer, tell the children that it means exactly what it says.

Ask the children if they ever tried to postpone doing a job their parents told them to do like "pick up toys" or "clean your room." Ask if they have ever said "I'll do it later" or "I'll do it tomorrow." Have the children tell how their parents responded. Ask if their parents accepted a postponement or insisted that it be done that day. Have the children tell why they think their parents insisted that the job be done then. (You might want to ask how many children sometimes "forget" to do the job the next day.) Remind the children that experience would help the parents to know that jobs that are left for the next day don't always get done, or they grow into larger jobs, or the person responsible "gives" the job in question to someone else.

Note to the Teacher

On another occasion you may wish to discuss the saying as suggested below. It is recommended that this interpretation be done separately from the other so the students are not confused.

Tell the students that Never leave till tomorrow what you can do today can mean something else besides being timely about completing chores. Tell them that it means that treating people kindly, helping them, and saying nice things to them should not be put off until tomorrow either. Say: If you have a chance to help someone, or say something nice to someone, you should do it right away. Sometimes people don't get a chance to thank someone, or say something nice at a later time, so it is important to do it right away.

BCP DRAFT LIT 74

First Grade -Poetry -Lesson 13 - Hope

Objectives

Identify what it is that the poet hopes.

Brainstorm activities to do instead of feeling lonely.

Materials

Poem on chart paper

Suggested Books

Hughes, Langston. Selected Poems of Langston Hughes. New York: Vintage Books, 1959.

Contains the poem "Hope."

Hughes, Langston. The Dream Keeper and Other Poems. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1994.

Collection of poems selected for young adults, illustrated by Brian Pinkney.

Teacher Background

Langston Hughes (James Mercer Langston Hughes) was born on February 1, 1902, in Joplin, Missouri and died May 22, 1967 in Harlem in New York City. His father left the family when Hughes was very young, and because his mother was forced to look for work they traveled from place to place. During his adult life he traveled to many parts of the world and worked at many different jobs.

Hughes was a prolific writer who left a wonderful legacy in his poetry, plays, novels, and short stories. The poems selected for The Dream Keeper are as relevant to children today as they were in 1932 when first published.

The poem "Hope" is the focus of this lesson, however additional poems that relate to Science and Music Lessons are included, as is information about another Hughes' work.

Procedure

Tell the children that the poem that you are going to read to them has a very short title of only four letters. Tell them that in addition to having a short title, the poem itself only has four lines. Say: Listen for the big feelings in this little poem. Read the poem.

Hope

Sometimes when I'm lonely

Don't know why,

Keep thinkin' I won't be lonely

By and by.

Langston Hughes

Ask the children if they think it is a happy poem. Ask: Does this poem make you want to clap your hands and tap your feet or does it make you feel like the poet was sighing when he wrote it?

Tell the children that Langston Hughes, the poet, was very good at writing in such a way

that the reader really gets a picture. Tell the children to close their eyes and think about a child sitting with his head resting on his hands looking out the window feeling all alone. Can they see BCP DRAFT LIT 75

First Grade -Poetry -Lesson 13 - Hope

him take a deep breath and sigh, wishing he wasn't all alone?

Read the poem again and then have the children accompany you for a third reading. Have them recite the poem with emotion.

Next, ask the children to help think of ways that someone could keep from feeling lonely. Suggest that they think of the things that they like to do when they are feeling lonely. Make a list of the things that the children suggest.

Additional Poems

"Winter Moon" is a beautiful, short poem that evokes an immediate visualization. Share this poem when studying the moon and its phases in Science.

Winter Moon

How thin and sharp is the moon tonight!

How thin and sharp and ghostly white

Is the slim curved crook of the moon tonight!

The beat and rhythm of music is quite evident in "African Dance." Read this poem when you are studying percussion instruments and jazz.

African Dance

The low beating of the tom-toms,

The slow beating of the tom-toms,

Low... slow

Slow... low--

Stirs your blood.

Dance!

A night-veiled girl

Whirls softly into a

Circle of light.

Whirls softly... slowly,

Like a wisp of smoke around the fire--

And the tom-toms beat,

And the tom-toms beat,

And the low beatings of the tom-toms

Stirs your blood.

In addition, you may enjoy sharing The Sweet and Sour Animal Book by Langston Hughes (NY: Oxford, 1994). This wonderful book, illustrated by students from the Harlem School of the Arts, is Hughes' alphabet for children. Previously unpublished, it was rediscovered fifty years after it was written. You and your students will enjoy the witty poems and delight in art created by other young people. You may even wish to do your own interpretations in paint or clay!

BCP DRAFT LIT 76

First Grade - Poetry - Lesson 14 - Washington

Objectives

Identify from the poem, the things Washington did as a child.

Explain what is meant by "He loved America all his life."

Materials

Maps of U.S. and Virginia

Teacher Background

Use this lesson in conjunction with the study of Washington in American Civilization. It provides another opportunity for the students to see young Washington. This poem helps in explaining patriots and patriotism in that the reader is able to see that devotion to his country was evident on several levels and at different ages for Washington.

Procedure

Ask the children to recall facts about George Washington. Identify his birthplace as a plantation near the Potomac River in Virginia. Point out the location first on a U.S. map and then on a map of Virginia. Discuss with the children that a plantation is a large farm with lots of land. Tell them that George probably spent his free time wandering around the property and exploring just the way they like to do.

Tell the students that the poem you are about to read tells in part about Washington's youth and in part about his adulthood. Tell them to listen for things that he liked to do when he was a boy that he still remembered as a man. Read the poem.

Washington

 

He played by the river when he was young,

He raced with rabbits along the hills,

He fished for minnows, and climbed and swung,

And hooted back at the whippoorwills.

Strong and slender and tall he grew--

And then, one morning, the bugles blew.

Over the hills the summons came,

Over the river's shining rim.

He said that the bugles called his name,

He knew that his country needed him,

And he answered, "Coming!" and marched away

For many a night and many a day.

Perhaps when the marches were hot and long

He'd think of the river flowing by

Or, camping under the winter sky,

Would hear the whippoorwill's far-off song.

Boy or soldier, in peace or strife,

He loved America all his life!

Nancy Byrd Turner

BCP DRAFT LIT 77

First Grade - Poetry - Lesson 14 - Washington

Have the children recall as many things as they can from the poem. List their suggestions on the board. Be certain that the children understand each one (whippoorwills, minnows).

Tell the children that when the poem says the bugles blew it doesn't mean exactly that someone was blowing a bugle in his yard. Explain that it meant a call to service, a call for George Washington to serve his country in the military. Explain that the word summons means a call to duty.Tell them that of course there certainly were bugles blowing as soldiers marched by, but George was the only one who heard them call his name. What the poet was really saying was that he chose to serve his country.

Ask the students what they think the last line of the poem means. Ask how Washington loved his country as a boy. If necessary help the students to see that he loved the beauty of his country. He appreciated the freedom to explore and enjoy the land. Then ask the students how they think Washington showed that he loved America when he was an adult. He became a soldier and led his troops in the fight for freedom from England. He wanted to keep America free from the rule of others.

If any of the children express a desire to determine the rhyme scheme, take a few moments to repeat a stanza.You may wish to have them tell the pairs of rhyming words. Keep the study of the form minimal and spend more time with the content of this poem relating it as much as possible to the American Civilization lessons.

BCP DRAFT LIT 78

First Grade - Literature - Rapunzel

Objectives

Sequence the events in the story.

Participate by reciting lines in the story.

Construct a braid that holds the sequenced events of the story.

Materials

Dittos of events in the story, braid pattern (included)

Yellow construction paper, yellow yarn or fringe

Sentence strips

Crayons, scissors, tape and glue

Suggested Books

Berensky, Alix, retold and illustrated by. Rapunzel. New York: Henry Holt, 1995.

Many full and double page illustrations; some pictures may frighten young children.

Cresswell, Helen. Classic Fairy Tales. London: HarperCollins, 1993.

Illustrations by Carol Lawson throughout this collection that includes "Rapunzel."

Ehrlich, Amy, adapted by. The Random House Book of Fairy Tales. New York: Random House, 1985.

Beautiful illustrations by Diane Goode.

Grimm, Jakob. Rapunzel. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell, 1975.

Colorful illustrations by Bernadette Watts make this a good choice.

Grimm, Jakob. Favorite Tales from Grimm. New York: Four Winds Press, 1982.

Beautiful illustrations are scattered throughout, but this is not a picture book.

Rogasky, Barbara, retold by. Rapunzel. New York: Holiday House, 1982.

Illustrations and text are framed in the beautiful artwork of Trina Schart Hyman.

Teacher Background

Depending on the version you select, the story may or may not identify that the plant rampion is also called rapunzel. Explain to the children that rampion is a tasty green eaten in a salad. Obviously, the main character's name came from the name of the food that her mother desired, and her father stole.

You may wish to use a different "call" to Rapunzel when you have your students participate. Once again, depending on the version, they can be quite different and in some cases quite involved. The very simple line "Rapunzel, Rapunzel, let down your hair" is easy for the children to remember and recite.

 

Procedure

Tell the students that the story you are going to read to them is about a girl with very long hair. Ask if anyone knows the name of the story about this girl. If no one is able to, tell them the name and explain that the word rapunzel is another name for a plant named rampion. Ask how many students have ever eaten lettuce or greens and explain that rampion is eaten in this way.

Read one of the suggested versions, encouraging the students to join in with you when calling to Rapunzel. You may wish to let the students further participate by pretending to unfurl their braids and drop them out of the tower window.

BCP DRAFT LIT 79

First Grade - Literature - Rapunzel

When you have finished reading the story ask the students to help you recall the events from the point where the witch takes Rapunzel and puts her in the tower. Sequence the events when writing them on the board. Use the following questions to help in recalling the events. Ask: How did the witch get up into and down from the tower? (climbed Rapunzel's braids) Who saw the witch climbing the braids and later called to Rapunzel? (the prince) What happened when the witch found out that the prince had been to see Rapunzel? (cut off her hair and sent her away to the forest) After Rapunzel was sent away and the prince called to her who was waiting for him in the tower? (the witch) When the prince fell from the tower what happened to him? (he was blinded by the thorns and sent to wander) At the end of the story who did the prince find, and what happened when he did? (Rapunzel, her tears healed his eyes)

Have several students take turns telling the sequence that follows this introduction:

Once upon a time a lady was very hungry for some rampion that grew in the yard next door. She thought that she would die if she didn't get some. Her husband stole some of the plant for her but got caught by the wicked witch who lived there. He had to promise to give the baby his wife was carrying to the witch. The witch named the baby Rapunzel, and when she was older Rapunzel was locked in a tower.

Tell the students that they will now cut out the events of the story, and sequence the events pasting them in order on one of Rapunzel's braids. Distribute yellow construction paper and the dittoed sheet of events. Demonstrate how to fold and cut the paper to make the braid (see below), or provide pre-cut braids, or construction paper with the outlines printed on it. You may wish to have the students draw and color illustrations for the events in the story, while you assist in cutting and assembling the two sections to form one long braid.

Have the students cut out the events, and glue them on the braid sequencing in the correct order from top to bottom. If they have not already illustrated each event have them do that now. Attach the braid at the top to a piece of sentence strip with Rapunzel written on it, and at the bottom end of the braid attach yarn or fringe to simulate hair.

Display the braids or allow the students to take them home and share this "hair falling" tale.

How to fold and cut the construction paper to make a braid

1. Fold a 9x12 piece of yellow construction paper in half lengthwise.

2. Cut into 2 strips and fold each strip into thirds.

3. Round the corners of the rectangle you now have (3 layers thick) by cutting off the 4 points and rounding slightly.

4. Open the strip to reveal three "segments" of the braid.

5. Repeat the process for the second strip and attach one strip to the other to form a single long strip.

 

Witch puts Rapunzel

in the tower.



Prince climbs up

to Rapunzel.



Rapunzel is sent away

by Witch.



Prince climbs up

to Witch.



Prince falls on thorns.



Prince and Rapunzel

find each other.

BCP DRAFT LIT 80

First Grade - Literature - The Princess and the Pea

Objectives

Describe the test used to identify a true princess.

Make a picture to illustrate the story.

Materials

Copy of the story

Dried peas or fresh peas, if available

Crayons, manila paper

Suggested Books

Andersen, Hans Christian. The Princess and the Pea. New York: Clarion, Seabury Press, 1978.

Delicately drawn, beautiful full-page illustrations by Paul Galdone.

Bell, Anthea, trans. The Princess and the Pea. Natick, MA: Picture Book Studio, 1987.

Illustrations by Eve Tharlet present very child-like characters.

Ehrlich, Amy, adapted by. The Random House Book of Fairy Tales. New York: Random House, 1985.

Beautiful illustrations by Diane Goode.

Gackenbach, Dick, retold by. The Princess and the Pea. New York: Macmillan, 1983.

Cartoon-like illustrations.

Le Gallienne, Eva. Seven Tales by Hans Christian Andersen Translated from Danish. New York: Harper & Row, 1959.

Beautiful illustrations.

Philip, Neil, comp. Fairy Tales of Hans Christian Andersen. New York: Lothrop, Lee & Shepard, 1995.

No illustrations are included for this story.

Stevenson, Sucie, retold and illus. The Princess and the Pea. New York: Doubleday, 1987.

Sweet retelling with rabbits as characters.

 

Teacher Background

Because this is such a short story you may be inclined to not look for a picture book. The illustrations however, add to the enjoyment of the story, so a version that has been developed into a book is a very good choice.

You may want to tell the students that the author is Hans Christian Anderson who also wrote Thumbelina that they read earlier this year, and The Ugly Duckling and The Little Mermaid.

Procedure

Distribute dried peas to each of the students (if it is possible to use fresh peas, all the better). Ask them to describe the peas (round, hard, bumpy, etc.). Ask: What are some ways that peas like this can be used? (Accept all reasonable responses like eating, planting, shooting through a pea shooter, etc.) Can you imagine that a pea like this could be used for a very important test?

Tell the children that they are going to hear about that very important test in a fairy tale BCP DRAFT LIT 81

First Grade - Literature - The Princess and the Pea

called The Princess and the Pea. Have several students recall the elements of a fairy tale before you begin (October fairy tale overview, Puss in Boots). Read the story.

Have a student tell how the pea was used as part of a test in the story. Ask: What did the queen know about true princesses when she put the pea in the bed? Help the students to recognize the amount of padding by counting aloud from one to twenty for the first twenty mattresses, then continuing to count to forty to include the twenty down quilts (or the number according to the version you choose). Ask the students if they think it would be possible to feel the pea through so many layers, much less have it cause bruises. Tell the children that if a person was able to feel the pea through so many layers they would have to be very special and very delicate.

Ask the students to name other qualities they think a princess should have besides being delicate. They may suggest kind, wise, fair when making laws etc. List the students' suggestions on the board and briefly discuss each one.

Repeat the ending line of the story ("Now this is a true story!") and ask the children why they think it was included. Ask: Does Hans Christian Andersen really want us to believe that it is a true tale or is he teasing us? Have the children explain the reasons for their answers.

Have the students do an illustration of the pea at the bottom of the mattresses and the princess on the top of the bed. Remind them to count the mattresses that they draw to be sure that the stack is tall enough. You may wish to let the students glue a pea on each of their drawings.

BCP DRAFT LIT 82

First Grade - Literature - Sleeping Beauty

Objectives

Predict the gifts that were given by the eleven fairies.

Recall and respond to the elements of fairy tales in this story.

Consider several variations to this tale.

Materials

One of the suggested books

Suggested Books

Cresswell, Helen. Classic Fairy Tales. London: HarperCollins, 1993.

Illustrations by Carol Lawson throughout this collection of tales.

Ehrlich, Amy, adapted by. The Random House Book of Fairy Tales. New York: Random House, 1985.

Beautiful illustrations by Diane Goode.

Hoffmann, Felix, retold by. The Sleeping Beauty: Story by the Brothers Grimm. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World, 1959.

Hyman, Trina Schart. The Sleeping Beauty from the Brothers Grimm. Boston: Little , Brown & Company, 1977.

Beautiful illustrations.

Caution: The following books are not recommended for this age.

Carter, Angela, ed. Sleeping Beauty and Other Favorite Fairy Tales. New York: Schocken Books, 1984.

One of the more difficult translations with few pictures.

Mayer, Mercer, retold and illustrated by. The Sleeping Beauty. New York: Macmillan, 1984.

Very involved retelling with difficult vocabulary and story line.

Philip, Neil and Nicoleta Simorowski, ed.The Complete Fairy Tales of Charles Perrault. New York: Clarion, 1993.

Gruesome tale with horrible deeds attempted.

 

Additional Book

Minters, Frances. Sleepless Beauty. New York: Penguin Books, 1996.

Updated version with a very clever Beauty; lines rhyme with an almost rap beat.

Teacher Background

The books noted under Caution are not recommended for this age student. They are accurate retellings but contain vocabulary that would be difficult for this age child; and in some instances tell of horrific events that are not usually included.

Procedure

Begin the lesson by having the students recall the elements of fairy tales that you have discussed so many times before. Tell the students that they are to be careful listeners and to raise their hands each time they hear one of the elements in the story you read. Ask: What should you BCP DRAFT LIT 83

First Grade - Literature - Sleeping Beauty

do if the story begins "Once upon a time"? (raise hands) When all the students are clear about their participation, begin reading. Each time the students raise their hands, stop and ask what they recognize as an element. Congratulate students each time they are correct and praise any creativity they may demonstrate in interpreting an element.

When you have completed the story ask the students to tell which they thought was most exciting: when the evil fairy cast the spell, when Beauty pierced her finger on the spindle, or when the prince kissed Beauty and she awoke? Have the children give the reasons for their choices and allow a brief discussion of each.

Tell the students to imagine that they were one of the eleven fairies who also gave Beauty gifts. Have them first consider what those gifts might be, reminding the students that the gifts were not physical like toys, but good qualities and virtues. Encourage the students to role play the part of the fairy, waving an imaginary wand and naming the gift as they cast their spell.

Allow as many performers as desire, to extend their gifts to princess Beauty. If you wish, you may even have students take the parts of the king and queen, the evil fairy and the twelfth fairy. For a real change of stories ask the students if they could imagine that Beauty was not a princess, but a prince named Bruce. What sort of gifts might he receive and how might he prick himself to fall into a deep sleep?

You may wish to ask the students if they think that the king and queen were good parents. Ask the students why or why not (yes-they remove all the spinning wheels so that Beauty will not be hurt, no-in some versions they leave the kingdom when she falls asleep and do not stay with her).

You may even want to discuss with your students whether the uninvited fairy was angry, jealous or hurt when she cast the spell on Beauty. What gift might she have given if she had been invited to the celebration? This would have made quite a different story!

You may enjoy sharing the book Sleepless Beauty, which presents a very different and very clever Beauty. Students will enjoy the rhythmic pattern of the verse and cheer when Beauty proves to be the heroine of the tale (the times have certainly changed).

 

BCP DRAFT LIT 84

First Grade - Literature - Bibliography - February

*Andersen, Hans Christian. The Princess and the Pea. New York: Clarion, Seabury Press, 1978.

*Bell, Anthea, trans. The Princess and the Pea. Natick, MA: Picture Book Studio, 1987.

Berensky, Alix, retold and illustrated by. Rapunzel. New York: Henry Holt, 1995.

*Cresswell, Helen. Classic Fairy Tales. London: HarperCollins, 1993.

*Ehrlich, Amy, adapted by. The Random House Book of Fairy Tales. New York: Random House, 1985.

*Gackenbach, Dick, retold by. The Princess and the Pea. New York: Macmillan, 1983.

*Grimm, Jakob. Rapunzel. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell, 1975.

*Grimm, Jakob. Favorite Tales from Grimm. New York: Four Winds Press, 1982.

*Hoffmann, Felix, retold by. The Sleeping Beauty: Story by the Brothers Grimm. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World, 1959.

Hughes, Langston. Selected Poems of Langston Hughes. New York: Vintage Books, 1959.

*Hughes, Langston. The Dream Keeper and Other Poems. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1994.

*Hughes, Langston.The Sweet and Sour Animal Book. New York: Oxford, 1994.

*Hyman, Trina Schart. The Sleeping Beauty from the Brothers Grimm. Boston: Little, Brown & Company, 1977.

*Le Gallienne, Eva. Seven Tales by Hans Christian Andersen Translated from Danish. New York: Harper & Row, 1959.

Philip, Neil, comp. Fairy Tales of Hans Christian Andersen. New York: Lothrop, Lee & Shepard, 1995.

*Rogasky, Barbara, retold by. Rapunzel. New York: Holiday House, 1982.

*Stevenson, Sucie, retold and illus. The Princess and the Pea. New York: Doubleday, 1987.



*Denotes recommended versions