Baltimore Curriculum Project Draft Lessons

Introductory Notes

These lessons generally follow the grade-by-grade topics in the Core Knowledge Sequence, but they have been developed independent of the Core Knowledge Foundation. While the Core Knowledge Foundation encourages the development and sharing of lessons based on the Core Knowledge Sequence, it does not endorse any one set of lesson plans as the best or only way that the knowledge in the Sequence should be taught.

You may feel free to download and distribute these lessons, but please note that they are currently in DRAFT form. At this time the draft lessons on this web site do NOT have accompanying graphics, such as maps or cut-out patterns. Graphics will be added to this site later.

In participating BCP schools, these lessons are used in conjunction with the Direct Instruction skills programs in reading, language, and math. If you use or adapt these lessons, keep in mind that they are meant to address content and the application of skills. You will need to use other materials to ensure that children master skills in reading, language, and math.

BCP DRAFT HIST/GEOG 46

First Grade - American Civilization/Geography - January Overview

The lessons for January are centered around the American Revolution. Teachers should note that this topic is studied in further detail at the fourth grade level. First Grade teachers should limit their lessons to those that follow and be assured that the lessons will be built upon and developed during the fourth grade year.

The lessons for January stop with the signing of the Declaration of Independence. The February lessons will pick up at that point and bring conclusion to the American Revolution.

Suggested Titles

Reference Books

Adler, David. Thomas Jefferson: Father of Our Democracy. New York: Holiday House, 1987.

Anderson, Joan. A Williamsburg Household. New York: Clarion, 1988.

Bliven, Bruce, Jr. The American Revolution. New York: Random House, 1986.

Brandt, Keith. Paul Revere Son of Liberty. Mahwah, New Jersey: Troll, 1982.

Fradin, Dennis. The Declaration of Independence. Chicago: Childrens Press, 1988.

Fritz, Jean. And Then What Happened, Paul Revere? New York: Coward-McCann, 1973.

Fritz, Jean. Can't You Make Them Behave, King George? New York: Putnam, 1977.

Giblin, James Cross. Fireworks, Picnics, and Flags. Boston: Clarion, 1983.

Mollo, John. Uniforms of the American Revolution. New York: Macmillan, 1975

Morris, Richard B. The American Revolution. Minneapolis: Lerner, 1985.

Oleksy, Walter. The Boston Tea Party. New York: Franklin Watts, 1993.

Rand, Ted. Illustrator. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Paul Revere's Ride. New York: Dutton, 1990.

Rappaport, Doreen. The Boston Coffee Party. New York: HarperCollins, 1988.

Richards, Norman. The Story of the Declaration of Independence. Chicago: Childrens Press, 1968.

Read Aloud Books

Benchley, Nathaniel. George the Drummer Boy. New York: HarperCollins, 1977.

Haley, Gail. Jack Jouett's Ride. New York: Viking, 1973.

Keller, Holly. Henry's Fourth of July. New York: Greenwillow, 1985.

Monjo, F.N. Grand Papa and Ellen Aroon. Dell, 1990.

Smith, Kathie. Thomas Jefferson. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1989.

Stein, R. Conrad. The Story of Lexington and Concord. Chicago: Childrens Press, 1985.

BCP DRAFT HIST/GEOG 47

First Grade - American Civilization/Geography - Lesson 21

Objectives

Review information about Jamestown and the Pilgrims.

Locate the original thirteen colonies.

Materials

A classroom size U.S. map and world map

Map of the thirteen colonies (attached)

Procedure

Say: We have learned about the first European settlers who came to America. Ask: What can you remember about the settlement of Jamestown? (Allow children to recall information. See Lesson 11 and Lesson 12. Children should recall information regarding the planting of tobacco and the use of slaves.)

Say: After Jamestown, another colony was established at Plymouth, Massachusetts. Ask: Who were these people? (the Pilgrims) Ask: What do you remember about the Pilgrims? (Allow children to recall information. See Lesson 12 and Lesson 13.)

Say: Today we are going to begin lessons about a war that took place in America. Many years have passed since the Pilgrims arrived in America. Thirty years after the Pilgrims arrived there were about 50,000 other English colonists who came to live in North America. Only twenty years after that there were more than 250,000 people in America. Colonists were coming not only from England, like the Pilgrims, but they were coming from the other countries of Europe as well. (Point to Europe on the map.) And thousands of Africans were brought to America to work as slaves.

Say: By 1750 there were more than one million people living in America. Small farms,

villages, plantations, and four busy cities--Boston, New York City, Philadelphia, and Charles Town (Charleston, South Carolina) could be found here. (Locate these cities on the map.) The people of America lived along the Eastern coast of America from Maine to Georgia (Point to the area on the map.) Ask: Why do you think they lived along the coast? (Help children to understand that the colonists arrived from Europe by crossing the Atlantic Ocean on boats.)

Say: Even though the colonists came from many countries in Europe, they still had strong ties to England. The people who lived in America followed the rule and orders of the king of England. We will see how the people of America decided to break away from the rule of England.

Distribute the map of the thirteen colonies. Say: These are the original colonies of America. All the people who came from Europe to live in America lived in this region. We call this area the original thirteen colonies because these were the first colonies of our country. Later, we called these colonies the United States of America.

Children may color the colonies different colors. Help them to identify Maryland as one of the thirteen original colonies.



BCP DRAFT HIST/GEOG 47a

First Grade - American Civilization/Geography - Lesson 21

The Thirteen Original Colonies

Color the colonies different colors. Can you find Maryland?



Graphic

BCP DRAFT HIST/GEOG 48

First Grade - American Civilization/Geography - Lesson 22

Objectives

Identify some of the events that lead to the American Revolution.

Discuss The Boston Tea Party.

Materials

A classroom size U.S. and a world map

Individual size milk cartons (one per student)

Tea bags (one per student)

Plastic straws (one per student)

Construction paper (brown and blue)

Clay

Suggested Titles

Fritz, Jean. Can't You Make Them Behave, King George? New York: Putnam, 1977.

Oleksy, Walter. The Boston Tea Party. New York: Franklin Watts, 1993.

Rappaport, Doreen. The Boston Coffee Party. New York: HarperCollins, 1988.

Teacher Note

Children will construct a boat to help recall the Boston Tea Party. These boats will be made out of individual size milk cartons. Prior to this lesson, have children save their milk cartons from lunch. Open the tops of the cartons and wash them out thoroughly. Allow the cartons to air dry.

Procedure

Say: We have learned that our country grew very quickly after the Pilgrims arrived. We know that most of the people who came to live in America came from Europe (point to Europe on the map). We also know that these people had very strong ties with England (point to England on the map).

Say: There were many things that caused the colonists of America to become angry with the King of England. One thing that angered the colonists was the King's refusal to allow them to move west.

Ask: Who remembers where the thirteen original colonies were located? (along the East coast) Say: The colonists wanted to move west into the Indian land between the Appalachian Mountains and the Mississippi River. The English King said the Indians should have that land and ordered the colonists to "remove themselves at once."

Say: Look carefully at the map. See how far away England is from the coast of America? (Point out the distance on the map.) The King of England was really too far away to know what should be done in America. He made other rules and laws that the colonists did not like. The colonists became very tired of the King's rules, they decided they should make their own laws.

Say: Many colonists did not think England treated its American colonies fairly. The King made laws requiring the colonists to pay taxes on tea, glass, and other things the people of America needed and bought from England. Ask: Do you know what a tax is? (Allow children to respond.) Say: A tax is an extra amount of money that

BCP DRAFT HIST/GEOG 49

First Grade - American Civilization/Geography - Lesson 22

is added onto the price of something we buy. This extra money is used to support the government. The English government never asked the colonists how they felt about these taxes, or how the extra money made by the tax should be spent.

Say: The tax that really upset the colonists was a tax on tea. The colonists enjoyed drinking tea and could only buy it from England. When the King ordered extra money for the tea, the colonists had enough. A group of colonists in Boston dressed up as Indians. They boarded a ship in Boston Harbor. All the tea the King wanted them to pay an extra tax on they dumped into the water. This event became known as the Boston Tea Party. You can see that this was not a party at all. The colonists were angry and they let the King of England know it. When the King learned of the Boston Tea Party, he was very mad. He sent soldiers from England to come to America to make the colonists behave and follow his orders. We will see that these events led the colonists to fight back.

Conclude the lesson by reading a book about the Boston Tea Party. Assist children in making a boat. Point to the Boston Harbor on the map. Children should recall from their geography booklet that a harbor is a protected place where ships are safe from the ocean's waves.

Directions for making the boat:

1. Distribute the cleaned milk cartons to each student.

2. Assist the children in cutting the tops of the cartons off so only the box shape remains.

3. Cover the carton with brown construction paper.

4. Cut a triangular shape out of the blue construction paper to represent a sail.

5. Staple the sail to the plastic straw.

6. Place a small amount of clay into the bottom of the carton.

7. Place the straw into the clay.

8. Distribute the tea bags one per student.

9. Staple the string of the tea bag to the inside of the boat.

10. The tea bag may be thrown out of the boat as the colonists did during the Boston Tea Party.

11. Children may print Boston Tea Party along the side of the boat.

Encourage the children to take their boats home and tell a family member what they have learned about the colonists and their anger over the tax on tea.

BCP DRAFT HIST/GEOG 50

First Grade - American Civilization/Geography Lesson 23

Objectives

Identify Paul Revere.

Identify the Minutemen.

Define democracy as "rule of the people."

Discuss the shot "heard round the world."

Construct a paper lantern.

Materials

A classroom size U.S. map

Black construction paper (9 x 12) one per student

Gray construction paper (1 x 10) one per student

Any color construction paper (1 x 8) one per student

Yellow construction paper (2 x 3) one per student

Strip of handwriting paper (1 x 10)

Suggested Titles

Benchley, Nathaniel. George the Drummer Boy. New York: HarperCollins, 1977.

Brandt, Keith. Paul Revere Son of Liberty. Mahwah, New Jersey: Troll, 1982.

Fritz, Jean. And Then What Happened, Paul Revere? New York: Coward-McCann, 1973.

Rand, Ted. Illustrator. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Paul Revere's Ride. New York: Dutton, 1990.

Stein, R. Conrad. The Story of Lexington and Concord. Chicago: Childrens Press, 1985.

Teacher Information

In 1860 Henry Wadsworth Longfellow wrote Paul Revere's Ride. You may wish to read it to your class. Here is the first verse:

Paul Revere's Ride

Listen my children, and you shall hear

of the midnight ride of Paul Revere,

On the eighteenth of April, in Seventy-five;

Hardly a man is now alive

Who remembers that famous day and year.

He said to his friend, 'If the British march

By land or sea from town tonight,

Hang a lantern aloft in the belfry arch

Of the North Church tower as a signal light, -

One, if by land, and two, if by sea;

And I on the opposite shore will be,

Ready to ride and spread the alarm

Through every Middlesex village and farm,

For the country folk to be up and to arm.'







BCP DRAFT HIST/GEOG 51

First Grade - American Civilization/Geography - Lesson 23

Procedure

Ask: Who remembers what tax caused the colonists of America to become angry with the King of England? (the tax on tea) Ask: What did the colonists do to show they were angry about the tea tax? (Some colonists dressed up as Indians and threw the tea into the Boston Harbor.) Ask: What did the colonists call this event? (The Boston Tea Party.)

Say: When the King of England heard about the Boston Tea Party he was furious. He

decided to punish the colonists for dumping the tea in the harbor and not paying the tax on it. He closed the Boston Harbor to all ships until the colonists paid for the lost tea. Soldiers from England were sent to Boston and the people of the city were ordered to allow them to stay in their homes and to feed them. The colonists were outraged.

Ask: How would you feel if you were ordered to allow soldiers, from a country that you were angry with, to come into your home and eat your food? (Allow children to discuss and empathize with the colonists.)

Say: The colonists wanted to rule themselves. They did not want to follow the rules and laws of the English King. The colonists wanted democracy. Democracy means rule of the people.

Say: The colonists began preparing for war. They were preparing to fight for the right to rule themselves, for democracy, and for their freedom from the rule of England. Farmers and townspeople began training to fight. They called themselves Minutemen because they were expected to be ready to fight the English soldiers at a minute's notice.

Say: The Minutemen collected guns, gunpowder, and other supplies and hid them in the village of Concord. Concord was just a short distance northwest of Boston. (Locate Concord on the map.)

Say: The colonists were afraid the supply of guns would be taken away from them by the English soldiers. They had spies watching to see which way the soldiers would come. One colonist, named Paul Revere, arranged a signal to help him warn the other Minutemen. The signal was "One if by land, and two if by sea." One lamp would be hung in the window of a church tower to tell Paul Revere that the English soldiers were marching by land from Boston to Concord. Two lamps hanging in the church window meant the soldiers were coming by boat.

Say: One night Revere saw two lamps in the window of the church tower. He knew the English soldiers would come by sea.

Ask: What do you think Paul Revere did when he saw the lamps in the church window? (Allow children to speculate.)

Say: Paul Revere jumped on his horse and rode through the countryside alerting all the townspeople that the soldiers were coming. He shouted, "The Redcoats are coming! The Redcoats are coming!" The Minutemen began to get ready to fight.

Ask: Why do you think Revere called the soldiers "Redcoats?" (Allow children to speculate.)



BCP DRAFT HIST/GEOG 52

First Grade - American Civilization/Geography - Lesson 23

Say: The English soldiers were nicknamed Redcoats because they wore red coats as part of their uniform.

Say: As the English soldiers marched to Concord to take the hidden guns, they passed through a small town called Lexington. (Locate Lexington on the map.) The people of this town were ready thanks to Paul Revere. A shot rang out; no one knew whether it came from an English soldier or a Minuteman. But this first shot fired at Lexington became known as the shot "heard round the world."

Ask: Do you think this shot was really heard all around the world? (no)

Say: It was called the shot 'heard round the world' because it signaled the beginning of America's fight for freedom from England. This war was called The American Revolution.

Conclude the lesson by reading one of the books listed under Suggested Titles. Assist children in completing the paper lantern activity.

Directions for paper lantern:

1. Distribute the black construction paper to each student.

2. Fold the black paper in half horizontally.

3. Cut 1" strips along the fold line up to 1"

from the top of the paper.

(You may need to have the children draw a line

1" [or a ruler's width] from the end of the paper

to lessen the possibility of accidentally cutting through.)

Graphic



4. Unfold the paper. Staple the ends together vertically to create a lantern.



Graphic



5. Staple the gray strip to the top of the lantern as a handle.

6. Cut a flame shape from the yellow construction paper. Staple the flame to the top of the remaining construction paper to resemble a candle.

7. Attach the paper candle to the inside of the lantern with staples.

8. Print One if by land, two if by sea. on the handwriting strip. Staple the sentence to the bottom

of the lantern.

BCP DRAFT HIST/GEOG 53

First Grade - American Civilization/Geography - Lesson 24

Objectives

Recall and review information from Lessons 16 and 17.

Identify the Redcoats and the Minutemen.

Color pictures of an American Soldier or an English Soldier.

Materials

Soldier pattern (attached)

Tagboard (8 x 12) one per student

Crayons, markers

Construction paper scraps (all colors)

Suggested Titles

Bliven, Bruce, Jr. The American Revolution. New York: Random House, 1986.

Mollo, John. Uniforms of the American Revolution. New York: Macmillan, 1975.

Morris, Richard B. The American Revolution. Minneapolis: Lerner, 1985.

Procedure

Ask: Who remembers what the American soldiers who were ready to fight at a minute's notice were called? (Minutemen) Ask: Do you remember what the English soldiers were nicknamed? (Redcoats) Why? (because they wore red coats as part of their uniforms.) What was the name of the war between the American colonists and the Rule of the English King? (The American Revolution) Do you remember why the colonists went to war with England? (The colonists were fighting for the right to rule themselves [democracy], for independence from England.)

Prepare several tagboard patterns of the soldier pattern (attached). Distribute one piece of tagboard or heavy paper to each student. Instruct the children to trace the soldier pattern onto their tagboard and cut the shape out carefully.

Divide the class in half. Instruct one part of the class to turn their soldier into a Redcoat and the other half to make a Minuteman out of their soldier.Tell the children who are making Redcoat soldiers to make the soldier wearing a bright red jacket. Typically these soldiers wore white pants and black boots. The children making Minutemen should use darker colors for jackets and pants. Discuss that although some of the Minutemen were issued uniforms, many wore just their typical work clothes of pants and shirts.

Provide reference books for the children to consult (see the list of titles above and in the January Overview).

Children may use scrap construction paper, markers, and crayons to create their soldiers. Pin the completed soldiers up in the classroom. Point out how the red jackets of the English soldiers really stand out. Discuss how easy it was for the Minutemen to spot the English soldier during battles. The red jacket made an easy target for the Minutemen to shoot at.









BCP DRAFT HIST/GEOG 53a

First Grade - American Civilization/Geography - Lesson 24

Soldier Pattern





Graphic

























BCP DRAFT HIST/GEOG 54

First Grade - American Civilization/Geography - Lesson 25

Objectives

Recognize that the American Revolution brought independence to America.

Identify the Declaration of Independence as a document upon which our country was founded.

Identify Thomas Jefferson as the author of the Declaration of Independence.

Recognize that the Fourth of July is the date celebrated as Independence Day.

Materials

White typing or tracing paper

Colored pencils (regular lead pencils will also work)

Nickels (four or five to be passed around the class)

A copy of the Declaration of Independence (attached)

Suggested Titles

Adler, David. Thomas Jefferson: Father of Our Democracy. New York: Holiday House, 1987.

Anderson, Joan. A Williamsburg Household. New York: Clarion, 1988.

Fradin, Dennis. The Declaration of Independence. Chicago: Childrens Press, 1988.

Haley, Gail. Jack Jouett's Ride. New York: Viking, 1973.

Monjo, F.N. Grand Papa and Ellen Aroon. Dell, 1990.

Richards, Norman. The Story of the Declaration of Independence. Chicago: Childrens Press, 1968.

Smith, Kathie. Thomas Jefferson. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1989.

Procedure

Say: We have learned that the American Revolution was America's fight for freedom to make and follow our own rules and laws. There were many great people involved in the effort to win America's Independence. Thomas Jefferson was one of those American heroes.

Distribute the typing/tracing paper. Show the nickels. Have children identify the coin and its worth. Say: Thomas Jefferson is pictured on the front of the nickel. His home, Monticello, is shown on the back. Instruct children to place the nickel under the paper and make a rubbing of the coin by gently rubbing across the coin with the edge of a colored or lead pencil. Students should make rubbings of both the front and back of the coin. They may print one of Jefferson's quotes under their rubbings, "I cannot live without books." Thomas Jefferson. Instruct children to pass the nickel to their neighbor as they complete the activity.

Say: In 1776, a year after the fighting started, Thomas Jefferson was asked by the leaders of the American Colonies to write to the English King explaining why the colonies wanted to be independent. Thomas Jefferson wrote a document called the Declaration of Independence. It stated that all men are created equal. No one had ever started a country before with that idea. On July 4, 1776, leaders of the colonies signed the Declaration of Independence. Some colonists were worried and afraid. They knew the Declaration meant they would have a long war with England. But they were also excited. The Declaration of Independence was the beginning of a new country. Today when we celebrate the Fourth of July, or Independence Day, we are remembering the birthday of our country.





BCP DRAFT HIST/GEOG 55

First Grade - American Civilization/Geography - Lesson 25

Say: The Declaration of Independence is important for two reasons. It declared or stated that the colonies were free from England's rule and also that the American citizens should have a say in how their country is governed.

Ask: Remember the word democracy? What does it mean? (It means the rule of the people.)

Say: Remember the colonists were angry with the King of England. They did not like having to follow his rules without getting a chance to discuss them. They did not have a democracy when the King was in charge of all the rules.

Ask: Do you think the colonists wanted a King to rule them in America? Why not? (Allow children to conclude that the colonists wanted a change in government. They wanted a voice in determining rules and laws.)

Say: By signing the Declaration of Independence the colonists were telling the King that they were no longer following his rules. They would start their own country and make up their own laws. They were saying that they would be independent, or free, from England's rule.

Say: The opening words of the Declaration of Independence have inspired people all over the world. The original copy of the Declaration can be seen in Washington, D.C.

Conclude the lesson by reading one of the books listed under Suggested Titles. A copy of the Declaration of Independence is attached. You may wish to make a copy and have the children add their signatures to the bottom. Be sure to point out the signature of John Hancock. Tell the children about how John Hancock signed his name extra large so the King of England wouldn't have any trouble reading it.

Read one of the following books about the Fourth of July, Henry's Fourth of July, by Holly Keller (Greenwillow, 1985) or Fireworks, Picnics, and Flags, by James Giblin (Clarion, 1983).

































BCP DRAFT HIST/GEOG 55a

First Grade - American Civilization/Geography - Lesson 25







Graphic