BCP DRAFT LIT 33



Baltimore Curriculum Project Draft Lessons

Introductory Notes

These lessons generally follow the grade-by-grade topics in the Core Knowledge Sequence, but they have been developed independent of the Core Knowledge Foundation. While the Core Knowledge Foundation encourages the development and sharing of lessons based on the Core Knowledge Sequence, it does not endorse any one set of lesson plans as the best or only way that the knowledge in the Sequence should be taught.

You may feel free to download and distribute these lessons, but please note that they are currently in DRAFT form. At this time the draft lessons on this web site do NOT have accompanying graphics, such as maps or cut-out patterns. Graphics will be added to this site later.

In participating BCP schools, these lessons are used in conjunction with the Direct Instruction skills programs in reading, language, and math. If you use or adapt these lessons, keep in mind that they are meant to address content and the application of skills. You will need to use other materials to ensure that children master skills in reading, language, and math.

First Grade - Literature - November Overview

The November literature lessons include two poems, sayings and phrases, and the reading of Cinderella stories from around the world. Literary terms are introduced and explored throughout the context of the different lessons. These lessons are not sequential in nature and may be taught in any convenient order. You may wish to tie the poem Thanksgiving Day into the history lesson regarding the Pilgrims first Thanksgiving. Suggested book titles to use in the teaching of literature this month follow.

Suggested Titles

Child, Lydia Maria. Over the River and Through the Wood A Thanksgiving Poem by Lydia Maria Child. New York: North-South Books, 1993.

Climo, Shirley. The Korean Cinderella. New York: HarperCollins, 1993.

Hooks, William. Moss Gown. New York: Clarion Books, 1987.

Louie, Ai-Ling. Yeh-Shen A Cinderella Story from China. New York: Philomel Books, 1982.

Martin, Rafe. The Rough-Face Girl. New York: Putnam, 1992.

Perrault, Charles. Cinderella, retold by Marcia Brown. New York: Scribner's, 1954.

Steptoe, John. Mufaro's Beautiful Daughters. New York: Scholastic, 1987.

Stevenson, Robert Louis. A Child's Garden of Verses. New York: Delacorte Press, 1985.

BCP DRAFT LIT 34

First Grade - Literature - Sayings and Phrases

Objectives

Listen to comprehend and to obtain information.

Practice makes perfect.

Say: People use this saying to mean that doing something over and over makes you good at it. Ask the children to name some things that they think they are good at. Answers may be things like: playing soccer, riding my bike, counting numbers, jumping rope, running. Guide all children to think of something that they can accomplish successfully. Say: You learned how to do that thing by practicing it over and over. When you first started riding your bike, you probably fell off several times. You may even have felt like giving up on it, but by practicing it over and over you finally learned how to ride. If you had not kept practicing, you would not ever have learned how to ride your bike. You can learn how to do anything you want, if you remember the saying, practice makes perfect!



Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.

Say: Who remembers this saying from earlier this year? Allow children to explain its meaning. Firm up that this saying is called the Golden Rule. People use it to mean: Treat people as you would like to be treated yourself. The saying comes from the Bible. Ask children to give examples of how the saying applies to their lives. Ask them to give examples of how the saying is used. Say: We are going to be reading Cinderella stories this month. We will think about how this saying would apply to the characters in the different versions of Cinderella.

As you read the following Cinderella stories to your class, refer to this saying again. Each of the heroines in the different versions can be used as examples to furthur illustrate Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.

BCP DRAFT LIT 35

First Grade - November - Poetry

Thanksgiving Day by Lydia Maria Child

Objectives

Respond to poetry through a group activity.

Interact with rhythm and tempo in poetry through an oral presentation.

Experiment with choral speaking.

Discuss Thanksgiving family traditions.

Suggested Title

Child, Lydia Maria. Over the River and Through the Wood A Thanksgiving Poem by Lydia Maria Child. New York: North-South Books, 1993.

Procedure

If possible obtain the above-mentioned book to share with the children as you teach this lesson. It is beautifully illustrated with woodcuts by Christopher Manson. Read the poem aloud to the children. Direct them to listen to the words as you read the poem and to not join in yet even if they are familiar with the poem. Read the poem a second time and assist children in clapping the rhythm and tempo. Some of the children may recognize the poem as a song. Tell them that it was first written as a poem and later the music was added. As children gain confidence in clapping the tempo and rhythm, add the melody to the poem by singing it with the children.

Next, develop choral speaking using a line-a-group arrangement. In this arrangement a group of children reads one line, another group reads the next line, a third group reads the third line, and so forth. See the poem below for how to divide the class into groups. If you do not have access to the poem in book form, you will need to write it out on chart paper or the chalk board. Experiment with other choral speaking arrangements. You may wish to have the whole class read orally every time the phrase Over the river and through the wood appears in the poem.

After reading and enjoying the poem, lead the children in a discussion of Thanksgiving family traditions. Examine and discuss the traditions in the poem; compare them to traditions the students may have. Conclude the lesson by having the whole class sing the poem.

Thanksgiving Day

Over the river and through the wood,
To Grandfather's house we go; group one
The horse knows the way
To carry the sleigh group two
Through the white and drifted snow.
Over the river and through the wood--
Oh, how the wind does blow! group three
It stings the toes
And bites the nose, group four
As over the ground we go.
Over the river and through the wood,
To have a first-rate play. group five
Hear the bells ring,
"Ting-a-ling-ding!" group six
Hurrah for Thanksgiving Day!
Over the river and through the wood,
Trot fast, my dapple-gray! group seven
Spring over the ground
Like a hunting hound! group eight
For this is Thanksgiving Day.
Over the river and through the wood,
And straight through the barnyard gate. group nine
We seem to go
Extremely slow - group ten
It is so hard to wait!
Over the river and through the wood -
Now Grandmother's cap I spy! group eleven
Hurrah for the fun!
Is the pudding done? group twelve
Hurrah for the pumpkin pie!






BCP DRAFT LIT 37

First Grade - November - Poetry

A Good Play by Robert Louis Stevenson Lesson 1

Objectives

Listen to the poem and respond personally to it through art.

Draw pictures of images created by the poet's words.

Materials

Drawing paper

Crayons or markers

Suggested Titles

Greenfield, Eloise. Night on Neighborhood Street. New York: Dial, 1991.

Hudson, Wade, selected by. Pass It On: African-American Poetry for Children. New York: Scholastic, 1993.

Prelutsky, Jack. The Dragons are Singing Tonight. New York: Greenwillow, 1993.

Thomas, Joyce Carol. Brown Honey in Broomwheat Tea. New York: HarperCollins, 1993.

Teacher Information

This poem will be studied in two lessons. The first lesson will allow the children an opportunity to gain familiarity with the verse and to respond to the words through art. The second lesson will explore and expand upon the use of rhyming words.

Procedure

Read the poem aloud, prompting the children to be good listeners.

A Good Play

We built a ship upon the stairs

All made of the back-bedroom chairs,

And filled it full of sofa pillows

To go a-sailing on the billows.

We took a saw and several nails,

And water in the nursery pails;

And Tom said, 'Let us also take

An apple and a slice of cake';

Which was enough for Tom and me

To go a-sailing on, till tea.

We sailed along for days and days,

And had the very best of plays;

But Tom fell out and hurt his knee,

So there was no one left but me.

Following the reading of the poem, lead the children in a discussion concerning unknown vocabulary. Read each stanza and check for meaning. Clarify that billows in the first stanza

BCP DRAFT LIT 38

First Grade - November - Poetry

A Good Play by Robert Louis Stevenson Lesson 1

refers to large ocean waves. Children may also need clarification in the second stanza as to the meaning of nursery pails and tea time as these are not common to American culture.

Read the poem again and tell children that this time they are to close their eyes and visualize (picture) the action that is taking place in the poem.

Following the second reading, ask: Did the children build a real boat? Clarify that the children in the poem were using their imaginations as they played at their home. Lead a discussion about imaginative play.

Read the poem a third time. Tell the children that following this reading they will draw a picture to go along with the words of the poem. Distribute drawing paper to each of the children and tell them to now draw a picture that shows what happened in the poem. Following the drawing time, allow children to share and discuss their pictures. Discuss how the pictures may be slightly different because people respond to poems in different ways.

Suggested Follow-Up Activity

Read other poems that produce a vivid image (see selections noted in Suggested Titles). Allow children to respond to the poem through art by drawing pictures of the images created by the poet's words. You may wish to vary the art medium and allow children to work with watercolors or chalk.

BCP DRAFT LIT 39

First Grade - November - Poetry

A Good Play by Robert Louis Stevenson Lesson 2

Objectives

Identify the words that rhyme in the poem.

Participate in a rhyming activity.

Experiment with word families.

Complete word family wheels to further study rhyme.

Materials

Activity sheets

Procedure

Review the poem A Good Play by rereading the verse again to the students. Tell to children that today they are going to listen for the words that rhyme. Explain that rhyming words are words that have the same ending sounds.

A Good Play

We built a ship upon the stairs

All made of the back-bedroom chairs,

And filled it full of sofa pillows

To go a-sailing on the billows.

We took a saw and several nails,

And water in the nursery pails;

And Tom said, 'Let us also take

An apple and a slice of cake';

Which was enough for Tom and me

To go a-sailing on, till tea.

We sailed along for days and days,

And had the very best of plays;

But Tom fell out and hurt his knee,

So there was no on left but me.

Read only the first stanza. Tell children to raise their hands if they hear rhyming words. As children identify the words stairs and chairs, and pillows and billows print them on the chalkboard. Underline the letters that the word groups have in common and say: Words that have the same ending sounds are called rhyming words.

Read the second stanza. Again ask children to listen for and identify the rhyming words. Print nails and pails; take and cake; and me and tea on the chalkboard as they are identified. Draw attention to me and tea, explain that even though the words do not have the same letters at the end of them, they still rhyme because they have the same ending sound.

Read the last stanza. Children should identify the words days and plays, and knee and me as the rhyming words. Read again each of the pairs of rhyming words that have been written on the chalkboard. Tell children to listen carefully for the ending sounds to be sure that they are rhyming words.

BCP DRAFT LIT 40

First Grade - November - Poetry

A Good Play by Robert Louis Stevenson Lesson 2

Continue the discussion of rhyming words with a full group activity. Tell children you are going to read some riddles to them. The answer will be a rhyming word from the riddle. Say: A pet that rhymes with log is ________. Be sure children understand to think of a pet that rhymes with the word log. Print log on the board. Children will probably think of dog as the answer. Print dog under the word log on the chalkboard. Challenge children to think of other words that rhyme with log and dog. Continue to print the responses under log. Children may be able to add frog and hog to the list. Tell children to continue to think of words that rhyme with log. The words no longer need to be types of pets. A word list family of og words should now be complete and on the board. Following is a sample list:

Log

dog

hog

frog

fog

jog

smog

Underline the og letters in each of the words in the list. Ask: Do these words all rhyme? Who can tell us why we say these words rhyme? (They rhyme because the words all have the same ending sound.)

Tell the children to listen carefully to the next riddle. Remind them the answer must be a rhyming word. Say: Who can name a pet that rhymes with hat. Print hat on the board next to the list of og words. Children will respond with cat. Print it under the word hat. Challenge children to think of other words that rhyme with cat and hat. The words do not have to be names of pets. Generate a list similar to the following. Read each word in the list again, underlining the at letters in each word.

Hat

cat

bat

fat

mat

pat

rat

sat

that If children do not think of words beginning with blends, write them on the board

flat yourself and challenge children to read them. Remind them to use the rhyming

splat sounds to help figure out the new word.

Continue the word family activity in the same manner as described above. Continue to challenge children to read unknown words by adding to the list they have generated with more difficult words that begin with blends as shown in the at word family example.

Use the following riddles to produce word families.

* A part of your face that rhymes with win is ________.



BCP DRAFT LIT 41

First Grade - November - Poetry

A Good Play by Robert Louis Stevenson Lesson 2

Chin

win

fin

bin

grin

pin

thin

skin

spin

tin

twin

 

* A person that rhymes with ran is _____.

Man

ran

fan

can

van

than

tan

plan

pan

span



Conclude the lesson by reading all the word lists again with the children. Firm up that words that have the same ending sound are rhyming words.

Suggested Follow-Up Activity

The following word family wheels are made by coloring the picture and cutting the wheel and the object out on the heavy dark lines. Attach the wheel with a brad fastener to the back of the object. Children spin the wheel to read the words of the different word families. You may wish to complete the different wheels over several days.

BCP DRAFT LIT 41a

First Grade - November - Poetry

A Good Play by Robert Louis Stevenson Lesson 2







BCP DRAFT LIT 41b

First Grade - November - Poetry

A Good Play by Robert Louis Stevenson Lesson 2









BCP DRAFT LIT 41c

First Grade - November - Poetry

A Good Play by Robert Louis Stevenson Lesson 2

BCP DRAFT LIT 42

First Grade - November - Literature - Cinderella stories from around the world Lesson 1

Objectives

Read and enjoy variations of the same folktale.

Compare and contrast the basic story elements of setting, character, and magical object within the folktale.

Develop understanding of the literary terms character, hero, heroine.

Suggested Titles

This lesson will be ongoing for several days and will require the reading of several versions of the Cinderella story. It is important for you to locate several of the following titles in order to compare and contrast the folktale. You may be able to locate other versions from Egypt, Vietnam and other Native American Cultures.

Climo, Shirley. The Korean Cinderella. New York: HarperCollins, 1993.

Hooks, William. Moss Gown. New York: Clarion Books, 1987.

Louie, Ai-Ling. Yeh-Shen A Cinderella Story from China. New York: Philomel Books, 1982.

Martin, Rafe. The Rough-Face Girl. New York: Putnam, 1992.

Perrault, Charles. Cinderella, retold by Marcia Brown. New York: Scribner's, 1954.

*Steptoe, John. Mufaro's Beautiful Daughters. New York: Scholastic, 1987.

* This book will be developed further in a future lesson. It will be necessary for you to locate a copy.

Procedure

You will be reading aloud one of the Cinderella stories listed above each day for the next three to five days, depending upon how many different Cinderella stories you are able to obtain.

Tell the children you will be reading different versions of the Cinderella story. Start the lesson by reading the most widely recognized version of the story by Perrault. When you have read the story aloud, discuss the literary terms characters, hero, heroine. Define heroes and heroines as the main characters in a story that are the most brave, or the most kind, or the most anything that is good. When the character is a boy or a man, we call him a hero; when it's a girl or woman, we call her a heroine.

Tell the children a character is any person who appears in stories. Characters can be heroes or heroines, villains, or just normal people. They can even be bears, or rabbits, or giants or monsters. Ask the children to think about the Cinderella story you just read. Have them identify the characters in the story. They should list Cinderella, the stepmother and stepsisters, the fairy godmother, and the prince. Ask which of the characters is a hero or a heroine. They should identify Cinderella as the heroine because she is a girl and she is kind and good. Ask whether they think the prince is a hero. Why or why not?

On chart paper begin a chart similar to the one on the following page to hang in your classroom. Have the children help fill in the columns for heroine's name, the setting, and magical object. Tell the children that you will read a different Cinderella story tomorrow and that they can help fill in the chart again after they listen to the next story.

Each day, read a different Cinderella story. Have the children identify the characters and

BCP DRAFT LIT 43

First Grade - Literature - Cinderella stories from around the world Lesson 1

the heroine, then fill in the columns on the chart. As the chart is filled in, lead the children in a discussion that compares and contrasts the different versions. Locate the settings of the different stories on the world map, and point out the continent where the story originated.

The following chart is an example of how your class chart may look after you have read the different Cinderella stories. You may wish to change the story elements that you compare and contrast depending on the sophistication of your particular class.

TITLE AUTHOR HEROINE'S NAME SETTING MAGICAL OBJECT
Cinderella Perrault (translated by Marcia Brown) Cinderella "Cinderseat" France (Europe)

Ball

Fairy Godmother

Glass Slipper

Mufaro's Beautiful Daughters John Steptoe Nyasha Village (Africa) Nyoka-Snake
The Korean Cinderella Shirley Climo Pear Blossom Korea (Asia)

Festival

Frog, bird, ox

Straw Sandal

The Rough-Face Girl Rafe Martin Rough-Face Girl Indian Village near Lake Ontario (North America) Invisible Being
Yeh-Shen A Cinderella Story from China Ai-Ling Louie Yeh-Shen China (Asia)

Festival

Fish

Golden Slipper





Discuss with your children the fact that in each of the Cinderella stories there is a test to determine the rightful heroine. The test is somewhat different in each of the stories; however, the heroine passes the test set before her and marries the person of great worth in each story. For example, in the traditonal Cinderella story, the rightful heroine must fit her foot into the glass slipper. Challenge your children to identify the test each heroine must pass in order to marry the person of worth in the different versions of Cinderella.

BCP DRAFT LIT 44

First Grade - November - Literature - Cinderella stories from around the world Lesson 2

Objectives

Develop an understanding of the literary terms actor, actress, audience, costumes, scenery.

Dramatize Mufaro's Beautiful Daughters.

Suggested Title

Steptoe, John. Mufaro's Beautiful Daughters. New York: Scholastic, 1987.

Background For The Teacher

John Steptoe authored and illustrated many award-winning books during his lifetime. At the age of 16, Steptoe created Stevie, the first of its kind in American book publishing: Stevie was written to and for black inner-city children. Steptoe was dedicated to writing for and about black youngsters. His books are avenues for self-healing and personal growth. Other titles published by this talented author include, Baby Says, Birthday, Daddy is a Monster . . . Sometimes, and The Story of Jumping Mouse.

Mufaro's Beautiful Daughters pronunciation and meaning key:

Mufaro (moo-FAR-oh): happy man Manyara (mahn-YAR-ah): ashamed

Nyasha (nee-AH-sha): mercy Nyoka (nee-YO-kah): snake

Procedure

If you have already read this African version of Cinderella to your students, tell them you are going to read the story again. If you have not yet read it to your class, begin the lesson by showing the students the front cover. Tell them that this is another Cinderella story and to be good listeners as you read it aloud to them. Be sure to allow children an opportunity to enjoy the beautiful illustrations in this book. Refer to the pronunciation chart above if necessary to correctly pronounce the names of the characters in the story. Share with the children the meaning of the names (see above).

After you have read the story, lead the children in a discussion using the following questions:

*Where does this story take place? (Africa, in a village in Africa)

*Describe Mufaro's daughters. (Manyara was beautiful, but she was always in a bad temper and teased her sister when her father wasn't looking. Nyasha was also very beautiful; she was kind and loving and liked to sing when she worked in her garden.)

*Do you know what the words greedy and selfish mean? (Greedy means to want everything for yourself, even if you are hurtful toward others in your attempt to get it. Selfish means not sharing things, it means to be concerned only with yourself and not caring what happens to others.)

*Do you know what the words kindness and generosity mean? (Kindness means treating others in a loving, tender way. Generosity means sharing what you have with others.)

*Which of Mufaro's daughters was greedy and selfish? Which daughter was kind and generous? (Manyara was greedy and selfish. Nyasha was kind and generous.)

*Which daughter would you like to have for a friend? Why? (Nyasha would make a good friend because she would treat me with kindness.)

*Why did Mufaro's daughters need to go to the king? (The king wanted to choose one

BCP DRAFT LIT 45

First Grade - November - Literature - Cinderella stories from around the world Lesson 2

of them to be the queen.)

*What kind of a person do you think the king was hoping to find? (a person who is kind and good.)

*As Manyara traveled in the night to the city, how did she treat the boy and the old woman? (She was mean and hateful to them both.)

*As Nyasha traveled to the city, how did she treat the boy and old woman? (She shared

her lunch with the boy and gave the old woman sunflower seeds.)

*What happened to Manyara when she appeared before the king? (She said there was a great monster with five heads who knew all her faults and that she displeased him. She told Nyasha not to go there.)

*What happened when Nyasha went to the king? (Nyoka, the garden snake, was there. He changed shape and became the king. He told Nyasha he was also the hungry boy and the old woman whom she had treated kindly on the journey to the city.)

*How does the story end? (Nyasha agreed to marry the king. Manyara came to live in her sister's household as a servant.)

*What do you think the author wanted us to learn from this story? (We should treat others kindly at all times.)

*Why do you think this is an important story for people to hear? (The children should conclude that greed and selfishness as displayed by Manyara are harmful personal characteristics. Kindness and generosity as displayed by Nyasha are beneficial personal characteristics.)

Tell the children they are going to act out the story Mufaro's Beautiful Daughters. Say: First we need to decide who the actors and actresses should be. Does anyone know what an actor or actress does? Guide them to see and hear a relationship between the words actor, actress, act, and action. Then clarify that actors and actresses are the people who perform the action of the story. They can be in movies, on T.V., or on the stage in plays and shows. Firm up that actor refers to a man or boy who acts and actress refers to a woman or girl who acts.

List the main characters on the board and decide if they are parts for an actress or actor. Then assign a student to play that part.

Mufaro - Actor - Student's name

Nyasha - Actress - Student's name

Manyara - Actress - Student's name

Nyoka - Actor - Student's name

You may wish to include other characters from the story such as the little boy, the old woman, and the king. However, remind children that these people were all really the king (Nyoka) changing shape.

After the actors and actresses have been decided upon, introduce the children to the terms props, scenery, and costumes. Discuss how each of these literary terms is relevant to the dramatization of the story. Explain that props are the objects the characters use in the play. Scenery means the painted backdrops on a stage to show where the play takes place, and costumes are the clothes the actors and actresses wear during the performance. With the children, list any props they think might be needed for the performance, what the scenery should look like, and what costumes the actors and actresses might need.



BCP DRAFT LIT 46

First Grade - November - Literature - Cinderella stories from around the world Lesson 2

Props might include a green sock puppet to be used as Nyoka, garden tools for Nyasha to use as she works in her garden, and hair combs and a mirror for Manyara.

The scenery can be created by drawing with colored chalk on the chalkboard some of the beautiful flowers and birds as illustrated in the book.

Costumes can be created by draping sheets over the students and securing with belts or string.

This is not expected to be an elaborate production. Rather, it is intended to be a meaningful way to introduce the above mentioned literary terms.

Once everything is in place for the dramatization, tell the rest of the class that they are the audience. Discuss the fact that audience means a group of people who are the listeners and spectators (onlookers, observers). Review proper audience behavior.

You may wish to develop dialogue for the actors and actresses or you may wish simply to read the story aloud again slowly, allowing the performers to act out the action as it is described in the story.

If there is time, you may wish to allow other members of the class to assume the roles of the actors and actresses in a repeat performance.

BCP DRAFT LIT 47

First Grade - November - Literature - Cinderella stories - Culminating Activities

Objectives

Enjoy and celebrate Cinderella stories read this month.

Procedure

Select from the following ideas and activities to culminate the Cinderella unit.

1. Review each of the different versions of the Cinderella story you have read. Tally the results of a class vote naming the favorite version. Show children how a tally chart can be turned into a bar graph, line graph, and table graph.

2. Allow children an opportunity to illustrate a scene from their favorite Cinderella story. Have children write the title of the book they have chosen to illustrate from on their paper. Make the books you have read available for the children to look at and enjoy again independently.

3. Complete the Favorite Cinderella Story paper that follows. Allow children to work independently to complete.

4. As a class, complete the Once Upon a Time paper that follows. Create a transparency or recopy the story on chart paper. Allow children to fill in the blanks to create a class fairy tale.

















































BCP DRAFT LIT 48

First Grade - November - Literature - Cinderella Stories - Culminating Activities

Complete this fairy tale by filling in the blanks.

 

ONCE UPON A TIME

Once upon a time there was a ___________________ who lived with _______________. They lived _________________. They were very ____________________ until the day _______________arrived in town. ___________________ was very ______________________ and __________________ and always _________________________.

They had their first problem with ___________________ when

_____________said to them, "________________________________."

They were so ___________________ that they ___________________.

The next day they were ___________________________ when suddenly _____________________________. Before they knew it, ___________said, " _____________________________" and cast a magical spell on them. The magic spell___________________________ and the only way to break it was to _____________________________.

They felt ____________________. As weeks passed, they made a plan to break the spell. They decided they would ______________________ and______________________________.

One day they found ________________________ so they_____________________ and _______________________. To their surprise, the spell ______________________ and so they ___________________________________________ ever after.

 

 

BCP DRAFT LIT 49

First Grade - November - Literature - Cinderella Stories - Culminating Activities

Name __________________________________

Favorite Cinderella Stories

Fill in the title of your favorite Cinderella story for each of the following things. Decorate each award.















Favorite character Favorite setting















Favorite story













Favorite act of magic Favorite happy ending