BCP DRAFT MUS 7



Baltimore Curriculum Project Draft Lessons

Introductory Notes

These lessons generally follow the grade-by-grade topics in the Core Knowledge Sequence, but they have been developed independent of the Core Knowledge Foundation. While the Core Knowledge Foundation encourages the development and sharing of lessons based on the Core Knowledge Sequence, it does not endorse any one set of lesson plans as the best or only way that the knowledge in the Sequence should be taught.

You may feel free to download and distribute these lessons, but please note that they are currently in DRAFT form. At this time the draft lessons on this web site do NOT have accompanying graphics, such as maps or cut-out patterns. Graphics will be added to this site later.

In participating BCP schools, these lessons are used in conjunction with the Direct Instruction skills programs in reading, language, and math. If you use or adapt these lessons, keep in mind that they are meant to address content and the application of skills. You will need to use other materials to ensure that children master skills in reading, language, and math.

First Grade - Music - Lesson 3

Objectives

Learn song "Blow the Man Down" and know that it is a work song.

Differentiate between loud and soft singing.

Use body movements to reinforce the recognition of music in 3/4 time.

Materials

A few long pieces of rope or ribbon

Words to the song, "Blow the Man Down," printed below

(A copy of the melody is included for possible use by the teacher.)

Pictures of old sailing ships/cargo ships from 18th and 19th centuries

Background Information:

The children should know that sailors in England began singing this song well over a hundred years ago. No one knows who wrote the song, because the men just made it up as they went along, just the way someone who's a good story teller may make up a story to tell you. You might point out England on the map and ask: Why do you think there would be so many sailors in England? (an island, surrounded by water) Tell them that long ago when they began singing this song, sailing ships were one of the main ways that food, building supplies, and other things that people needed to buy or sell were brought in and out of countries. Sailors worked very hard loading and unloading all of these things, and so many different work songs were sung. "Blow the Man Down" is a work song.

The purpose of work songs is that long, long ago, people discovered that rhythm (recall rhythm from Lessons 1 and 2) and unity of action helped to perform a task faster and more efficiently. Think of all the tasks requiring physical work that used to be common. Now chopping wood, rowing a racing shell, doing carpentry by hand, planting fields are a few, but there used to be many many more tasks that had to be done by a whole team of people together, before machines were invented for doing the tasks. More than anything else, music gave joint effort real action and purpose. On board sailing ships, what tasks were involved? (Show picture of clipper ship, sailboat, etc.) There were no motors on these old ships which were used to move goods and people from place to place. You might remind the children about all the food and supplies explorers like Columbus had to load on their ships. You could show the many rivers that go great distances. On a large map of the world, point out the Mississippi in the United States and the Rhine River in Germany, the Nile in Egypt, and the Amazon in Brazil. You could discuss with them the following:

Tasks on old sailing ships:

Tasks for men who built the railroads:

Work songs for sailors and seafaring workers were called shanties. There were different kinds of shanties, depending on the job to be done. "Yo heave ho" (all pull on word ho) has short repetitive lines and is known as a short-drag shanty where a few strong pulls would do the trick--in reefing a topsail or furling a sail. (Think of "Haul Away, Joe"--all pull on word Joe.)

BCP DRAFT MUS 8

First Grade - Music - Lesson 3

"Blow the Man Down" is a halyard shanty (halyard is the rope for raising or lowering a sail or flag) used for longer and heavier tasks on ship--hoisting the sail, pulling the anchor, etc. These halyard shanties always follow the same form:

solo line, chorus line, solo line, chorus line, all of the same length.

This means the children have only to learn the simple chorus, which repeats again and again.

Procedure

Tell the children whatever you think is appropriate about work songs in general and this sea shanty in particular. Make it clear that you will sing all the parts that tell a story, with some very odd, old-fashioned words that sailors in England used many years ago. The students can listen to the words as you sing them and see how they sound, just as music. Teach the children the basic chorus, always emphasizing the rhythm by exaggeration and moving freely with your body. Tell them you are going to sing some verses loud and some soft, and you want them to sing the chorus back to you in the same kind of loud or soft voice you used. Alternate freely and have them follow you.



1.

Solo: As I went out walking down Paradise Street,

Chorus: To me, Way, Hey! Blow the man down

Solo: A pretty young damsel I chanced for to meet.

Chorus: Give me some time to blow the man down!

2.

Solo: She was round in the counter and bluff in the bow.

Chorus: To me, Way, Hey! Blow the man down.

Solo: So I took in all sails and cried,"Way enough now."

Chorus: Give me some time to blow the man down!

3.

Solo: I tailed her my flipper And took her in tow.

Chorus: To me, Way, Hey! Blow the man down

Solo: And yardarm to yardarm away we did go.

Chorus: Give me some time to blow the man down!

4.

Solo:But as we were going She said unto me,

Chorus: To me, Way, Hey! Blow the man down.

Solo: "There's a spanking full-rigger Just ready for sea."

Chorus: Give me some time to blow the man down!

5.

Solo: As soon as that packet was clear of the bar,

Chorus: To me, Way, Hey! Blow the man down

Solo: The mate knocked me down with the end of a spar

Chorus: Give me some time to blow the man down!

6.

Solo: So I give you fair warning Before we belay,

Chorus: To me, Way, Hey! Blow the man down

Solo: Don't never take heed Of what pretty girls say.

Chorus: Give me some time to blow the man down!



BCP DRAFT MUS 9

First Grade - Music - Lesson 3

After the children have sung the song with you, ask if anyone knows what rhythmic

pattern is in this work song? (3-beat pattern, the same as the song in Lessons 1 and 2) Ask if anyone knows how you can tell. If they need help, begin to clap the 1, 2, 3 steady beat, have them join you, and sing a bit of the song.

Finally, have groups of six or eight children take a piece of rope or ribbon to act out in rhythm swaying and "pulling" as if pulling in an anchor or hoisting a sail. Tell them they should imagine just how heavy the iron anchor is or how hard it is to hoist the heavy canvas sail all the way up a mast that is many many times taller than they are. Encourage them to feel the joint effort in the swaying of their bodies and pulling of their arms. As one group acts it out, the rest can clap rhythmically the basic 1, 2, 3 steady beat and sing the song with you. Point out that they are all pulling together on the count of 1 each time.

If there is the possibility of a class visit to the Baltimore Museum of Industry (1415 Key Highway, telephone 727-4808 for hours and details), many things about historical shipbuilding and teams of workers relating to Baltimore as a busy port for cargo can become hands-on experience for the children.

BCP DRAFT MUS 10

First Grade - Music - Lesson 4 - Families of Instruments

Objectives

Learn introductory material about four families of orchestral instruments.

Listen to selections from "Peter and the Wolf."

Materials

Pictures of instruments from 4 families (Folder begun at Lesson 2)

Recording of Serge Prokofiev, "Peter and the Wolf" (listening to the complete piece requires 20- 25 minutes depending on the particular performance)

Background for Teacher

Serge Prokofiev is a Russian composer who lived from 1891 to 1953. He is known primarily for his symphonies and ballet music, although he also wrote some wonderful chamber music as well. Prokofiev wrote both the words and the music for "Peter and the Wolf" in 1936 at the suggestion of a woman who was director of the Moscow Children's Theatre at the time. The two of them brainstormed about the kind of story they wanted to present to children as a way of familiarizing them with some of the instruments of the orchestra. They decided to find images that would easily be associated with the different instruments, and the first was the representation of a little bird by the flute. The full cast includes:

bird - flute

duck - oboe

cat - clarinet

grandfather - bassoon

wolf - three French horns

rifle shots - timpani and bass drum

Peter - the whole string section of the orchestra

Recommended Books

Hausherr, Rosmarie. What Instrument Is This? NY: Scholastic, 1992. Pp. 36-38 gives miniature line drawings of all the instruments and lists the instruments included in each family of the orchestra; also lists recommended age for starting lessons on various instruments and particular difficulties of each.

Jeunesse, Gallimard and Claude Delafosse. Musical Instruments. NY: Scholastic, 1994. (A First Discovery Book). Names instruments of each family of the orchestra. Also, see the two-page spread picturing full orchestra, placement and seating of all the instruments with approximate numbers in each section of instruments plus conductor.

Recommended Recording

There are a great many available recordings of "Peter and the Wolf," often in combination with other pieces appropriate for youngsters, since it is a short piece and takes up only a portion of a recording. For the purposes of this curriculum, an especially useful CD is one that combines Prokofiev's "Peter and the Wolf," Britten's Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra," and Dukas's "The Sorcerer's Apprentice," all of which are included in the Core

BCP DRAFT MUS 11

First Grade - Music - Lesson 4 - Families of Instruments

Knowledge Curriculum. The recording is CACD 1022, played by the London Symphony Orchestra with Ben Kingsley as narrator for two of the pieces. (The Dukas piece will be presented in Lesson 6 for First Grade, in October.)

Procedure

Make sure that the folder of instruments contains a few representatives from each of the family of orchestral instruments. (The string family was pictured on Lesson 2, and the two books above picture them, in the event that the children have not brought in sufficient pictures.) The children will learn more about specific instruments in later years; this is just an introduction to the families of instruments so that the children gain an idea about the characteristic sound of each

family and the fact that families of instruments are grouped together when they play in an orchestra, just the way the people in a human family live together.

Tell the children that there are four families of instruments that play in an orchestra and their names are strings, woodwinds, brass, and percussion. Remind the children that they heard a piece of music with stringed instruments (Lesson 2) and saw some pictures of the instruments. Try to have one or two of the children describe the instruments and what they sound like. (wooden bodies, strings to be plucked or bowed; for characteristic sound, accept any answer that indicates the child has listened to a stringed instrument).

Explain that the next family of instruments are called woodwinds. The sound is produced by blowing the breath into the instrument through some kind of special mouthpiece. These instruments generally have a relatively soft sound in the orchestra.

The third family is the brass family, which also produce music by having someone blow their breath through special mouthpieces into the tubing, but, since they are made of metal, their sound is always much louder than the woodwinds.

The fourth family is the percussion family, including all the drums, cymbals, and any other instrument that makes its sound by being pounded or struck. Ask the children for some suggestions of percussion instruments in an orchestra (tympani or kettle drum, bass drum, smaller drums, triangle, xylophone, celeste, glockenspiel, piano).

Next, tell the children that they are going to listen to some selections from a famous piece of music by a Russian composer whose name is Prokofiev. (Have them help you to find Russia on a map, and identify it as a country in the continent of Asia.) It is called "Peter and the Wolf" and it tells the story about Peter and the Wolf with instruments playing the characters in the story.They will also hear a man telling the main action of the story, but it is the instruments themselves who act out the characters, just the way characters in a play act out the story. Tell them that all four families of instruments will be playing the music, and each one will act out a different part of the story.

Play the piece, stopping three or four times to ask about the sounds the main characters make and what family they belong to. Encourage the children to use musical terms (loud, soft, high, low, sweet, harsh) in their responses as well as terms about their feeling responses (scary, brave, energetic, sneaky, happy, etc.)

Peter - strings

Duck, cat, and grandfather - woodwinds

Hunters - brass

Rifle - percussion

BCP DRAFT MUS 12

First Grade - Music - Lesson 4 - Families of Instruments

Activity

Have a large chart prepared with four sections on it for the four families of orchestral instruments, labeled as such. Go through the folder, holding up each picture you have gathered, and have the children identify its family. Then, have them tell you which section of the chart the instrument belongs in, and let someone paste it in the proper place. Encourage the children to continue to bring in pictures of instruments that can be added to the large chart.

BCP DRAFT MUS 5

First Grade - Music - Extra October Music Lesson - Circular Song

Objective

Learn to sing and identify a circular song.

Materials

Words to "There's a Hole in the Bucket," printed below.

Procedure

Draw a large circle on the board and ask the children: Who can show me the beginning of this circle? (hopefully, no one) Next ask: What about the end? Once this has been established as one of the characteristics of a circle, ask the children what they think would be the way to describe a circular song? (beginning and end are the same)

Next, say the words for the children, telling them beforehand that you want them to listen carefully to the words so they will be able to tell you how they can tell this is a circular song. Have the boys and girls form two lines facing each other. Teach the children the song, having the boys take the part of Henry and the girls, Liza. Encourage them to identify specific traits of the two characters and to portray them in their voices and bodies as they sing the song to one another.

 

"There's a Hole in the Bucket"

There's a hole in the bucket, dear Liza, dear Liza,

There's a hole in the bucket, dear Liza, a hole.

Well, fix it, dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,

Well, fix it, dear Henry, dear Henry, fix it.

With what shall I fix it, dear Liza, dear Liza,

With what shall I fix it, dear Liza, with what?

With a straw, dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,

With a straw, dear Henry, dear Henry, a straw.

But the straw is too long, dear Liza, dear Liza.

But the straw is too long, dear Liza, too long.

Then cut it, dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,

Then cut it, dear Henry, dear Henry, cut it.

Well, how shall I cut it, dear Liza, dear Liza,

Well, how shall I cut it, dear Liza, well how?

With an axe, dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,

With an axe, dear Henry, dear Henry, an axe.

BCP DRAFT MUS 6

First Grade - Music - Extra October Music Lesson - Circular Song

But the axe is too dull, dear Liza, dear Liza,

But the axe is too dull, dear Liza, too dull.

Then sharpen it, dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,

Then sharpen it, dear Henry, dear Henry, sharpen it.

On what shall I sharpen it, dear Liza, dear Liza,

On what shall I sharpen it, dear Liza, on what?

On a stone, dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,

On a stone, dear Henry, dear Henry, a stone.

But the stone is too dry, dear Liza, dear Liza,

But the stone is too dry, dear Liza, too dry.

Then wet it, dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,

Then wet it, dear Henry, dear Henry, wet it.

With what shall I wet it, dear Liza, dear Liza,

With what shall I wet it, dear Liza, with what?

With water, dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,

With water, dear Henry, dear Henry, water.

Well, how shall I carry it, dear Liza, dear Liza,

Well, how shall I carry it, dear Liza, well how?

In a bucket, dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,

In a bucket, dear Henry, dear Henry, bucket.

But there's a hole in the bucket, dear Liza, dear Liza,

There's a hole in the bucket, dear Liza, a hole.

Recommended for Additional Listening at any time during the school day

Audio cassette tape: Catherine Slonecki, "Children's Songs Around the World," (AC 56)

from Educational Activities Inc., P.O. Box 392, Freeport, NY 11520. The songs sung on this tape are not only multicultural but multilingual, so that children have a chance to experience the rhythms of languages other than English in songs whose tunes may already be familiar to them.

CD: "Rainbow Sign," (Rounder CD 8025). This is a wonderful collection of songs performed by many different soloists and groups, including African American spirituals, Spanish songs, a Navajo rain song, a Nicaraguan song, and a traditional French Louisiana song.