BCP DRAFT LIT 87

Second Grade - Literature - Sayings and Phrases - February
 

Don't judge a book by its cover.
 

Teacher Information

The saying Don't judge a book by its cover. is particularly significant when used in conjunction with the American Civilization lessons this month. Initially the students can be introduced to the literal meaning that the cover of a book does not always tell what is inside, but time should certainly be spent helping the students to see that judgement based on appearance took place for years and years (and unfortunately still continues today in some cases).

Use the discussion of this saying as an introduction to the history lessons and the literature lessons. References to this saying will be included in both.
 
 

Procedure

Prepare for this lesson by finding two books that are approximately the same size and have inviting covers, and that contain stories of interest to the students. (If you can use identical books, all the better.) Make a cover for one of the books out of brown paper.

Show both books (covered and uncovered) to your students and ask them to tell which book they would choose to read. This information may be gathered very simply with just a show of hands. Next, ask the students why they chose one book or the other. After a discussion of the reasons for their choices you may wish to compliment any students who chose the covered book by telling them that they have followed the saying Don't judge a book by its cover.

Open the books one at a time and show the children that they are equally appealing. Then ask the students if they have ever had the experience of selecting a book that looked good, only to find that it wasn't so interesting after all. Explain that this extends beyond books to other products and that people who advertise are so sure that we will judge something by its cover that they will encourage us to buy things by making them look good.

Tell the students that the saying Don't judge a book by its cover. really means a lot more. Ask the students to identify their own covers (body, outward appearance) and ask if they think people ever judge one another by the way they look. Have them consider the clothes people wear, hairstyles, weight, etc. Finally, discuss race (pertaining to skin color and eye shape), and gender. Tell the students that many people judge one another by this kind of outward appearance. Some people think that others are less capable because they have a different skin color or different shaped eyes, or are a different sex. Tell them that in history this month they will focus on some people who helped make the whole world realize that you can't--and certainly should not--judge a person or a book by its cover.

Ask the children to keep this saying in mind and certainly post it where it is visible. Advise them that even in the stories you will read this month the wisdom of this story comes through. Remind the students that there are fairy tales where characters are not really what they seem to be. Tell the students to be on the lookout for times when this saying really fits.
 
 
 

BCP DRAFT LIT 88

Second Grade - Literature - Sayings and Phrases - February
 

Two heads are better than one.
 

Ask the children to tell how they go about solving a problem. Most certainly someone will say that they ask someone else for help. Help them to see that people of all ages turn to one another for help, because we know that when we talk with another person we are more likely to come up with several possibilities for solving a particular problem.

Tell the children that this month's saying is Two heads are better than one. Tell them that they have just explained the saying by recognizing that two people can usually come up with several good ideas. Ask if they have ever heard someone say, "Let's put our heads together." Explain that this is just another way of recognizing that it is more likely that there will be a solution found if two or more people are talking and working together.

Ask the children if they can think of any situations that they have recently learned about when two or more people thinking and working together came up with a solution. If they have difficulty, you may wish to tell them to think about the time when the colonies were trying to decide what to do about King George and met together to come up with a solution. Ask them whether they think Wilbur would have been able to save himself without Charlotte's help (Charlotte's Web). You can also remind them of the help Lily received from her grandmother and father when she was trying to think of a way to make Liberty Crowns (Lily and Miss Liberty by Carla Stevens, NY, Scholastic, 1992).

Take time to relate Two heads are better than one to our everyday lives as well. Emphasize the idea of people thinking and talking together to solve a problem rather than each person acting independently of the other(s). Remind the students that players on a team talk together about how to win a game; they don't just play the way they want. Tell the students that even the president of our country has people who advise him and talk with him to solve problems. Say: When we brainstorm as a class we are really putting our heads together. Think of how many times today you will talk or work with someone else to solve a problem.
 

BCP DRAFT LIT 89

Second Grade - Poetry - Lesson 11 - Smart
 

Objectives (dependent on activity)

Identify the rhyming pattern.

Describe the irony portrayed in the poem.

Perform a pantomime of the poem.

Compare wise money management by two characters.

Listen to a selection of Silverstein's poems.
 

Materials

Signs that state the coin values and quantity mentioned in the poem (Good Sense ... activity)

Copy of the poem on chart paper

Suggested books
 

Suggested Books

Silverstein, Shel. Where the Sidewalk Ends. New York: Harper & Row, 1974.

Viorst, Judith. Alexander, Who Used to be Rich Last Sunday. New York: Atheneum, 1978.
 

Teacher Background

In order for students to appreciate the irony and humor of the poem Smart, this lesson should be presented after the students have learned coin values.

Students may feel a kinship with the speaker of the poem and may share personal disastrous experiences with money.

This lesson provides several activities that may be used with this poem. Select the one (or ones) most appropriate for your students.
 

Procedure

Tell the students that the poem they are about to hear is titled Smart. Briefly discuss what the word smart means. Read the poem.
 

Smart
 

My dad gave me one dollar bill

'Cause I'm his smartest son,

And I swapped it for two shiny quarters

'Cause two is more than one!
 

And then I took the quarters

And traded them to Lou

For three dimes--I guess he didn't know

That three is more than two!
 

Just then along came old blind Bates

And just 'cause he can't see

He gave me four nickels for my three dimes,

And four is more than three!
 

BCP DRAFT LIT 90

Second Grade - Poetry - Lesson 11 - Smart
 

And I took the nickels to Hiram Coombs

Down at the seed-feed store,

And the fool gave me five pennies for them,

And five is more than four!
 

And when I went and showed my dad,

And he got red in the cheeks

And closed his eyes and shook his head--

Too proud of me to speak!
 

Shel Silverstein
 
 

After you read the poem, discuss with the students whether the title is appropriate or not. Ask the students if they think the speaker is really smart or does he simply think he is.

You may wish to ask the students to identify the rhyme pattern (ABCB) and help them to identify that the poet has written this so it sounds just like a boy telling what he did, rather than someone else telling about him.

Choose any (or all) of the activities below to use in addition for your study of this poem.
 
 

A Poetry Performance

Have the students take the parts of the people mentioned in the poem. Have them pantomime the actions of exchanging one for the other. Encourage the children to exaggerate facial expression and body movement whenever possible while playing their roles. For instance, the character portraying the dad would have a smile as he initially hands out the bill, only to be replaced with closed eyes and a sorrowful shake of the head at the end. Repeat the activity as many times as necessary, so that all students will have a chance to participate.

The acting parts are: the dad, the speaker, some character to exchange the dollar for two quarters, Lou, Bates, and Coombs.
 

Good Sense and Bad Cents

In order for the students to see the financial decline that occurs in this poem, make signs that show $1.00, 50 cents, 30 cents, 20 cents, and 5 cents. On each sign also show the number of coins that produce that amount. (See example below) Have the children stand in line in the same sequence mentioned and hold up the sign when the coins and the amount they are holding are mentioned.
 
 
 

GRAPHIC
 
 
 

Other Money Disasters

The students may enjoy hearing stories about another character who had money woes. Share the book Alexander, Who Used to be Rich Last Sunday and discuss with the students the problem(s) and misfortune(s) faced by Alexander.
 

BCP DRAFT LIT 91

Second Grade - Poetry - Lesson 11 - Smart
 

Assign students to keep track of each expenditure that Alexander makes, and at the end of

the story add the amounts to show that he truly spends $1.00.

You may wish to tell the students that the author, Judith Viorst, is writing about her own three sons in this book. Ask the students if they think that many children have similar money problems to Alexander's, and if most mothers could tell the same story.
 

The Humor of Shel Silverstein

Students this age generally appreciate the humor of Silverstein. Share several of his poems with the students and then discuss the author as well as his poetry. Have the students speculate about Silverstein's own childhood. Do they think that Shel Silverstein could possibly be the subject of some of his own poems? Discuss whether they think he is a parent (he is!), and whether that has anything to do with the poems he writes.
 
 
 
 
 

BCP DRAFT LIT 92

Second Grade - Poetry - Lesson 12 - Hurt No Living Thing
 

Objectives

Write additional lines for the poem.

Illustrate a favorite line.
 

Materials

Pictures of insects (see Suggested Books)

Manila paper, crayons, paints, markers
 

Suggested Books

Fleming, Denise. In the Small, Small Pond. New York: Scholastic, 1993.

Fleming, Denise. In the Tall, Tall Grass. New York: Scholastic, 1991.

Wonderful artwork that shows many creatures.
 

Pallotta, Jerry. The Icky Bug Alphabet Book. Watertown: Charlesbridge, 1986.

Large colorful illustrations of bugs, not all are "icky."
 

Additional Ideas

Baker, Wendy and Andrew Haslam. Make it Work! Insects. New York: Thomson Learning, 1994.

Great how-to book for creating wonderful insects.
 

Teacher Background

You may wish to present this lesson in conjunction with this month's science lessons. This lesson requires creativity rather than scientific knowledge, but students may know a greater variety of insect and animal life after the science lessons are completed.
 
 

Procedure

Tell the children that the poem they are about to hear gives a special message. Read the poem and then ask the children to tell what the poem is telling us to do. (respect life)
 

Hurt No Living Thing
 

Hurt no living thing:

Ladybird nor butterfly,

Nor moth with dusty wing,

Nor cricket chirping cheerily,

Nor grasshopper so light of leap,

Nor dancing gnat, nor beetle fat,

Nor harmless worms that creep.
 

Christina Rossetti
 

Say: The poet, Christina Rossetti, had a way of making each of the creatures that she

BCP DRAFT LIT 93

Second Grade - Poetry - Lesson 12 - Hurt No Living Thing
 

mentioned seem not so ordinary. Ask: How did she do that? If the children are not sure, help them to see that it is the way she describes each one. Tell the children to listen to the poem with the descriptions removed to hear the difference. Read the following:
 

Hurt no living thing:

Ladybird nor butterfly,

Nor moth,

Nor cricket,

Nor grasshopper,

Nor gnat, nor beetle,

Nor worms.
 

Ask: Does the poem sound the same? What is missing? Help the children to identify that Rossetti describes the creatures by telling how they look, sound, or move.

On the board write the creatures mentioned in the poem minus their descriptors. Reread the original poem one line at a time asking the children to tell the description which belongs with each. When you have completed this, you may wish to have the children suggest other descriptive words to use in place of Rossetti's.

Tell the children that working together, the class is going to write more lines for the poem. Have the students suggest additional creatures, or provide the following: bumblebee, dragonfly, katydid, slug, and firefly. Show the students photographs or illustrations of a variety of living things to help with both selection and description. List these on the board and have the students suggest descriptions of appearance, movement or sound.
 

bumblebee - buzzes, zig-zags, black and yellow striped coat
 

dragonfly - flits, transparent wings
 

katydid - repeats name, small
 

slug - moves slowly, creeps, slippery looking, leaves trail, slimy
 

firefly - glows, lights up, shows up at night
 
 

Together with the students, choose key words and develop them into additional lines for the poem. It is not necessary to maintain the rhyme pattern, although you certainly may do so if you wish. The following lines are examples of lines you might develop.
 

bumblebee - zig-zagging across the garden
 

dragonfly - flitting this way and that
 

katydid - singing her name merrily to the trees
 

BCP DRAFT LIT 94

Second Grade - Poetry - Lesson 12 - Hurt No Living Thing
 

slug - leaving its crystal trail behind
 

firefly - lighting and brightening the sky
 

As a culminating activity, have the students illustrate their favorite line either from the original poem or one of those written by the class. You may wish to let the children color, paint, or even combine different materials as they create. Display the artwork with Rossetti's poem and the lines written by your class.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

BCP DRAFT LIT 95

Second Grade - Poetry - Lesson 13 - Lincoln
 

Objectives

Identify the boy and his activities referenced in the poem.

Objectives for Optional Activities

Identify the rhyme pattern.

Compare Lincoln's activities in this poem to similar experiences of Booker T. Washington.
 

Materials

Copy of the poem, or at least the first stanza, on chart paper

Photographs of Lincoln, the Lincoln Memorial

A penny, five-dollar bill (or pictures or facsimiles)
 

Suggested Books

D'Aulaire, Ingri and Edgar. Abraham Lincoln. Garden City: Doubleday & Co., 1939.

This book may be too long for a read aloud, but the illustrations are gorgeous and well worth sharing.

Livingston, Myra Cohn. Abraham Lincoln: A Man for All the People. New York: Holiday House, 1993.

Ballad, that tells life of Lincoln, is combined with beautiful illustrations by Samuel Byrd.
 

Recommended Title for Optional Activity

Bradby, Marie. More Than Anything Else. New York: Orchard Books, 1995.

Story of Booker T. Washington's desire to learn to read; provides a great parallel to Lincoln's love of books, as we see another boy stretched in front of the fireplace struggling to read.
 

Teacher Background

If at all possible, use this poem with the book More Than Anything Else. This book shows how very important learning to read and write were to Booker T. Washington, just as the importance and love of reading was to Abraham Lincoln. Both men were able to accomplish wonderful things because of their knowledge. This certainly is another way to underline the true source of power.

More Than Anything Else provides a biographical glimpse into the life of a man who overcame terrific odds. It is a valuable addition to the American Civilization lessons.
 

Copycat Magazine Jan/Feb 1997 (Vol. 12, Number 3) has a unit on Abraham Lincoln that includes a booklet for students to make, as well as interesting information on our sixteenth president.
 

Procedure

Tell the children that you are going to read a poem to them without telling the title of the poem. Tell them to try to figure out who the poem is about. Tell them that it is someone they have learned about recently.

Read the poem without mentioning the title or Lincoln's name in any way.
 

BCP DRAFT LIT 96

Second Grade - Poetry - Lesson 13 - Lincoln
 

Lincoln (do not read)
 

There was a boy of other days,

A quiet, awkward, earnest lad,

Who trudged long weary miles to get

A book on which his heart was set -

And then no candle had.
 

He was too poor to buy a lamp

But very wise in woodmen's ways.

He gathered seasoned bough and stem,

And crisping leaf, and kindled them

Into a ruddy blaze.
 

Then as he lay full length and read,

The firelight flickered on his face,

And etched his shadow on the gloom.

And made a picture in the room,

In that most humble place.
 

The hard years came, the hard years went,

But, gentle, brave, and strong of will,

He met them all. And when today

We see his pictured face, we say,

"There's light upon it still."
 

Nancy Byrd Turner
 

Read the poem again (continue to not mention the title) and explain any words that the students may not know like earnest, trudged, seasoned bough, crisping leaf, kindled, ruddy, etched, and humble.

After the second recitation ask the students if they know the name of the person that the poem is about. If someone is able to identify Lincoln, ask which clues in the poem helped. If no one is able to identify Lincoln, point out the clues in the poem (lived long ago, was poor, traveled on foot, read by firelight, gentle, brave, strong of will).

If possible, show the illustrations from the d'Aulaire book (or any other you may have). The children will easily see the scene described in the poem. Ask the children if they ever stretch out when reading a book or watching television. Remind them that it is a comfortable position and Lincoln spent a long time when he read in front of the fire. The students may enjoy knowing that the Bible, Aesop's Fables and Robinson Crusoe were his favorite books.

Remind the children that long ago people did not have electric lights in their houses. They had to use candles or oil lamps in order to have light at night or on a dark day. This cost money and a lot of families could not afford to have this luxury. Because the fire in the fireplace BCP DRAFT LIT 97

Second Grade - Poetry - Lesson 13 - Lincoln
 

was necessary for heat and cooking, it provided light for no additional charge. Women would sew and mend by this light and men would do small repairs on leatherwork or wood. The firelight would cause wonderful shadows of gigantic proportions.

Ask: When the poet says "The hard years came, the hard years went," what does she mean by that? What were the hard years that Lincoln faced? How did Lincoln meet them all? Have the students recall facts about the Civil War and Lincoln's part in history.

Finally, ask the children to name the places where we see Lincoln's face today (a penny, a five-dollar bill, the Lincoln Memorial). Explain that while the poet says "There's light upon it still" she doesn't mean the same light as from the fire, but rather a brightness or illumination because Lincoln was a man of great accomplishments. You may wish to share photographs of Lincoln; be sure to tell the students that he was the first president to be photographed.
 

Optional Activities
 
 

If you wish after you have discussed the content, take a look at the form of the poem. Display a copy of the poem, or the first stanza at least, and have the children look at the rhyme pattern. Ask if anyone can identify the pattern without your help. Help the class to see that the pattern is ABCCB with the second and fifth, and third and fourth lines rhyming. Have volunteers read the pairs of rhyming words.

You may also wish to have the students identify the number of lines in a stanza (5) and, if you have the entire poem copied, the number of stanzas (4).
 

If you are able to read More Than Anything Else, tell the children that it is a story about another boy who was similar to Abraham Lincoln in some ways. Tell them to listen to the story and think about the things that are common to both boys' lives.

After you have read the story ask the children to tell the similarities they heard or saw. The students should be able to recognize that neither boy was wealthy, that they both worked hard and they both recognized that learning was a powerful thing. The children will see the similarity of the scene in front of the fire. Tell the children that Booker T. Washington grew up to accomplish many fine things in his life. He always recognized, as did Lincoln, the importance of education and the freedom and power it could bring.

BCP DRAFT LIT 98

Second Grade - Poetry - Lesson 14 - Harriet Tubman
 

Objective

Revisit the poem and subject in the context of Civil Rights.
 

Suggested Books

Adler, David A. A Picture Book of Harriet Tubman. New York: Holiday House, 1992.

Cohn, Amy L., ed. From Sea to Sea. New York: Scholastic, Inc., 1993.

"Harriet Tubman," included.

Greenfield, Eloise. Honey, I Love and other love poems. New York: Harper & Row, 1978.

"Harriet Tubman" included.

Hudson, Wade, ed. Pass It On - African-American Poetry for Children. New York: Scholastic, Inc.,1993.

Contains the poem "Harriet Tubman."

McGovern, Ann. "Wanted Dead or Alive"-The True Story of Harriet Tubman. New York: Scholastic, Inc., 1965.

Excellent choice for a factual account of Harriet Tubman's life.

Ringgold, Faith. Aunt Harriet's Underground Railroad in the Sky. New York: Crown, 1992.

Colorful, striking illustrations add a visual statement to the story of Cassie and her brother Be Be and their discovery of the Underground Railroad. Notes and a map are included.

Schroeder, Alan. Minty-A Story of Young Harriet Tubman. New York: Dial Books, 1996.

Beautiful illustrations by Jerry Pinkney enhance this tale of the young girl who became known as Moses to her fellow slaves.
 

Procedure

Remind the students that the United States of America was founded on the idea that "all men are created equal." Ask if they can tell why it didn't seem that all Americans really believed that when the Constitution was written. (slavery existed; women and Native Americans did not have rights) Say: The people we will talk about this month as we study the history of America all worked to make sure that in America we were (and are) working toward all people being treated equal.

Ask if they can recall a woman who knew that slavery was wrong and did everything she could to help slaves escape to freedom. Say: She is sometimes called "Moses of her people," she was a conductor on the Underground Railroad who never lost a passenger. Have the children identify her in unison.

Tell the children that you would like to recite the poem about Harriet Tubman one more time because she is such an important person. Remind the children that you will be adding names this month to the list of heroes who made (and make) our country what it is. If you did not get a chance before to share some of the Suggested Books above, you may want to do it at this time.

Read the poem and then remind the children that without people like Harriet Tubman, our country and our world would be a very different place.
 
 
 

BCP DRAFT LIT 99

Second Grade - Poetry - Lesson 14 - Harriet Tubman
 
 

BCP DRAFT LIT 100

Second Grade - Literature - The Fisherman and His Wife
 

Objectives

Participate in the telling of the story.

Recall and sequence the wishes of the wife.

Illustrate one part of the series of wishes (optional).

Make a picture book of the story (optional).
 

Materials

A copy of one of the suggested books

Drawing paper, crayons, stapler
 

Suggested Books

Carle, Eric, ed. & illus. Eric Carle's Treasury of Classic Stories for Children. New York: Orchard Books, 1988.

Many illustrations in Carle's wonderful style throughout this book; good choice.

Grimm, Jakob and Wilhelm. The Fisherman and His Wife. Chicago: Follett, 1969.

Beautiful artwork by Katrin Brandt enhances this classic tale; wonderful choice.

Grimm, Jakob. Favorite Tales from Grimm. New York: Four Winds Press, 1982.

Beautiful illustrations are scattered throughout, but this is not a picture book.
 

Teacher Background

If it is impossible to find a version of this tale to read, simply tell the tale in your own words. You may substitute whatever call to the fish that you want, but a simple call is:

Fish of the sea,

Come to me,

Hear what my wife

Wants from thee.

Tell the children that thee is an old fashioned way of saying you and is used here to make the rhyme work. The students will certainly be able to remember this short call and join you in the telling.
 

Procedure

Ask the children if they can think of any stories where a person (usually a prince) has been changed into an animal or a creature. If they are unable, tell them that sometimes in fairytales a prince has a spell cast on him by a witch or a fairy. He is changed into a frog, or a beast, or some other creature as punishment for something he did or did not do. Tell them that is exactly what happened in this story. A prince has a spell cast on him and he is turned into a fish. Say: This is not an ordinary fish however, but an enchanted one who is able to grant wishes.

Tell the students to listen to the story and pay close attention to the wishes that are made. Tell them that later you will ask whether they think the wishes were wise or foolish. Tell them also that you would like them to participate in telling the story just as they have in the past. The way they will participate this time is by saying a rhyme to call the fish. Tell the students whatever "call" you wish them to use (see Teacher Background) and practice it several times before beginning the story.

BCP DRAFT LIT 101

Second Grade - Literature - The Fisherman and His Wife
 

Read (or tell) the story to the group, raising your voice and increasing your speed as the fish responds to the fisherman's continued supplications. Draw the attention of the students to the changes in the water each time the fisherman returns with another wish.

As you read involve the students by asking them to predict the direction of the story. After the wife is unhappy with the first wish, ask the students to predict whether she will be content with each of the subsequent wishes. Stop the story and ask: Will the wife be happy with ________? Also ask: Will the fish be happy when the fisherman returns and asks for another wish?

When you have completed the story, ask the children to tell what happened in their own words. After several children have shared their versions ask the children if they think there is something we should learn from this story. Hopefully they will suggest that it is not wise to be so greedy, or there are some things that people should not be allowed to have (be like God), or we should be thankful with what we have. Ask: Were the wishes wise or foolish? Why?

Have the children recall the wishes in their sequential order. Write them on the board in the form of a reverse pyramid, starting with the hut on the bottom. Show how the weight of bigger wishes granted finally collapses the structure back to the simple hut of the beginning. Use an arrow pointing from the top level back to the hut to show this. Have the children tell where they think the fisherman's wife should have stopped in her wishes and why.

The students may participate in another telling of the story in any one of several ways. You may wish to have students mime the roles of the fisherman, his wife and the fish as you read the story and have the other students be the chorus that calls the fish.

Another way to have the students participate is to have them do artwork for the story. Assign students to draw each of the following on separate sheets of paper: the fisherman, his wife, the fish, the hut, the nice house or cottage, the mansion, the castle, the even larger castle, and the huge church. Students hold the sheets of paper and move onto the "stage" whenever their character or setting is mentioned. Of course the other students can serve as the chorus and the tale can be told several times to involve all students.

Very basic picture books can also be made by the students that include only the visuals mentioned above. The pages can be stapled together and the student-storytellers can flip the pages as they tell their tales. The students might enjoy telling the story to each other or to younger students in the school.
 
 
 

Journal prompts

1. Pretend that you caught the enchanted fish and are given one wish; what would it be?

2. You decide to give your wish away to someone else; who is that person and why did you give him or her your wish?
 
 

BCP DRAFT LIT 102

Second Grade - Literature - Beauty and the Beast
 

Objectives

Identify reasons why the characters are named Beauty and the beast.

Design a Valentine for Beauty to give to the beast.
 

Materials

One of the suggested books

Construction paper, scissors, crayons, trims
 
 

Suggested Books

Apy, Deborah, retold by. Beauty and the Beast. New York: Henry Holt & Co., 1980.

Beautiful intricate artwork by Michael Hague throughout this tale.

Cresswell, Helen. Classic Fairy Tales. London: HarperCollins, 1993.

Illustrations by Carol Lawson throughout this collection of tales.

Ehrlich, Amy, adapted by. The Random House Book of Fairy Tales. New York: Random House, 1985.

Beautiful illustrations by Diane Goode.

Mayer, Marianne, retold by. Beauty and the Beast. New York: Four Winds, 1978.

Wonderful retelling paired with stunning illustrations by Mercer Mayer.

Osborne, Mary Pope, retold by. Beauty and the Beast. New York: Scholastic, 1987.

Beautiful illustrations by Winslow Pinney Pels; this is a very basic retelling, with the dreams left out.
 

Caution: The following book is not recommended for this age student.

Carter, Angela, trans. Sleeping Beauty & Other Favourite Fairy Tales. New York: Schocken Books, 1984.

Difficult translation with few pictures.
 

Teacher Background

Many of the children will no doubt be familiar with the Walt Disney version and film. Stress that the story that you will be reading is from the original fairy tale. Students will see similarities, but they will see many differences as well. You may wish to take the time to compare and contrast the two stories if a majority of your students are familiar with the Disney version.

You may wish to tell the children that the story has been translated from the French language and was written originally by Madame LePrince de Beaumont. The name Belle used in the Disney version is a French word that means beautiful.
 

Procedure

Write the title Beauty and the Beast on the board. Ask the children to tell what the words beauty and beast mean to them. Make two columns headed beauty and beast and list their suggestions under the appropriate word. Explain that the words have come to mean good and bad in many situations, for instance we may say "that car is a beauty" or we may say that someone has "beastly behavior." If we called people by those words we might mean the way they look, or

BCP DRAFT LIT 103

Second Grade - Literature - Beauty and the Beast
 

we could mean the way they act. Say: Think about those two ideas as you listen to the story. When the story is over, be ready to tell if the names come from the characters actions, their looks, or both.

Read the story. Interject questions where appropriate or simply muse aloud "I wonder why he did that!" or "I wonder what's going to happen next!"

When you have completed the story, ask the students to vote whether they thought the names Beauty and the beast came from the characters' actions, their looks or both. Discuss very briefly, then ask why they think the beast wanted Beauty to come to live with him. Ask: Do you think that he was happy living by himself? Do you think the beast was jealous that Beauty loved her father so much and no one loved him? Did the beast even know that Beauty was beautiful when he said he wanted her to come?

Next, ask the students if they think that Beauty loved the beast when she met him. What did he do to make her love him? You may need to remind the students that Beauty did not really care about a lot of money or fancy clothes (she only wanted a rose when her sisters wanted all sorts of fancy things), so the fancy things that the beast gave her were not so important. Ask: What important thing did the beast do that made Beauty start to care for him? (let her return to visit her father)

Finally, ask the students if they think the author was trying to tell us something important. Have them tell what they think the message for us is. Ask them if they remember the saying Get a taste of your own medicine. Did the beast get a taste of his own medicine in the beginning when he is so mean to others, and then does he get a "good" taste after he is kind to Beauty? Say: There is another saying, Beauty is as beauty does, what do you think that means? Was the best thing about Beauty the way she looked or the way she acted?

Tell the students that they are going to help Beauty tell the beast that she loves him by designing a Valentine for him. The valentine should be decorated and may say something about why Beauty loves the beast. Discuss the designs that would be appropriate for a Valentine, mentioning the rose as a traditional symbol of love that is most appropriate here. You may want to let students who desire, to also design a Valentine for Beauty from the beast.
 

Journal prompt

Tell the children that at different times we all have acted like Beauty (being kind) or the beast (being mean). Complete the sentences I act like Beauty when... and I behave like the beast when... (be sure that they understand the word behave).
 
 

BCP DRAFT LIT 104

Second Grade - Literature -The Emperor's New Clothes
 

Objectives

Predict what will happen next at various points in the story.

Write a newspaper article about the event.

Make a picture to accompany the article.
 
 

Materials

One of the suggested books

Manila paper, crayons, markers, copy of the article
 

Suggested Books

Andersen, Hans Christian. The Emperor's New Clothes. Reading: Addison Wesley, 1973.

Large wonderful illustrations by Monica Laimgruber make this a great choice.

Ehrlich, Amy, adapted by. The Random House Book of Fairy Tales. New York: Random House, 1985.

Beautiful illustrations by Diane Goode.

Gross, Ruth Belov, retold by. The Emperor's New Clothes. New York: Scholastic, 1977.

Inexpensive paperback with charming illustrations by Jack Kent.

Hague, Michael, comp. & illus. Michael Hague's Favorite Hans Christian Andersen Fairy Tales. New York: Henry Holt, 1981.

Beautiful intricate illustrations, unfortunately there is only one for this story.

Levinson, Riki, retold by. The Emperor's New Clothes. New York: Dutton, 1991.

Extremely detailed illustrations by Robert Byrd make the emperor a lion.

Mathias, Robert, retold by. The Stories of Hans Christian Andersen. Morristown: Silver Burdett, 1985.

Illustrations by Robin Lawrie.

Stevens, Janet, retold & illus. by. The Emperor's New Clothes. New York: Holiday House, 1985.

Whimsical animals replace the human characters in this retelling; the emperor is a rotund pig.
 

In Addition

Calmenson, Stephanie. The Principal's New Clothes. New York: Scholastic, 1989.

Wonderful updating of the classic tale.
 

Teacher Background

The variety of illustrations available for this tale are wonderful. If possible, bring in several versions to share. (The idea of someone being in his underwear, or better yet, naked, is especially appealing to this age.)
 
 

Procedure

Begin the lesson by saying: Raise you hand if you like to get new clothes. Ask the students who respond to tell why. Then tell the students that the story you are going to read is about a man who liked new clothes more than anything else and had more new clothes than anyone else.

Tell the students that the title of the story is The Emperor's New Clothes. Remind the children that an emperor is a person who rules, like a king or queen. In this story the emperor is BCP DRAFT LIT 105

Second Grade - Literature -The Emperor's New Clothes
 

supposed to have lived many years ago in a castle with many servants. You may want to have the children speculate about the kind of clothes such an emperor would wear. Talk to the students about royal robes trimmed in fur, and suits made of silk or satin with gold embroidery and trimmings.

As you read the story have the students predict what will happen after the weavers first come to talk to the emperor. Ask the children why they think the emperor agrees to let them make a suit for him. Continuing reading, stopping at points along the way to ask why the emperor sends someone in his place to look at the cloth. Ask also why the person does not tell the emperor the truth--that there really isn't any cloth at all.

When you have completed the story, ask the students why they think the child was able to say that the emperor wasn't wearing any clothes, when everyone else was afraid to say it. Discuss the idea that sometimes people say and do things that are wrong or fail to do things they know to be right because they are worried about what others will think or say about them. Ask the children if they think that new clothes will ever be important to the emperor again. Why or Why not? What do they think will be important to him? Ask: What do you think should be most important to him?

Tell the students that they are to pretend that they are newspaper reporters watching the parade when the emperor shows off his new clothes. They are to write an article that tells about the parade and answers the questions who, what, when, where and why. (Instead of having the students do this individually, you may want to do this activity as a group. The students can make a copy of the article you write together, or you may wish to provide a copy for each child.)

Ask for volunteers to respond to the five questions. On the board write the response(s) next to the question words.

Who - the emperor

What - was walking in the parade without any clothes

a child said that he didn't have any clothes on

When - today (the day of the week)

Where - in the street by the palace

Why - to show off his new clothes

Next help the students to put together a news article that includes all the above.
 
 

Monday (or any day), on the street in front of the palace, the emperor was seen leading a parade in his underwear (naked). He was supposed to be showing off his new clothes. A child in the crowd called out, "He hasn't got anything on!"
 
 

Have the children illustrate the incident and display the article and the accompanying pictures on a board titled Read All About It.

You may wish to share The Principal's New Clothes with the class, allowing them to predict what will happen before you begin. Take a few minutes to compare this updated version

with the old.
 

Journal prompt

The weavers said that they could make a cloth that could only be seen by people who were smart; if you made magic cloth who would be the only people who could see it?

BCP DRAFT LIT 106

Second Grade - Literature - Bibliography - February
 

Adler, David A. A Picture Book of Harriet Tubman. New York: Holiday House, 1992.

*Andersen, Hans Christian. The Emperor's New Clothes. Reading: Addison Wesley, 1973.

*Apy, Deborah, retold by. Beauty and the Beast. New York: Henry Holt & Co., 1980.

Bradby, Marie. More Than Anything Else. New York: Orchard Books, 1995.

*Carle, Eric, ed. & illus. Eric Carle's Treasury of Classic Stories for Children. New York: Orchard Books, 1988.

Cohn, Amy L., ed. From Sea to Sea. New York: Scholastic, Inc., 1993.

*Cresswell, Helen. Classic Fairy Tales. London: HarperCollins, 1993.

D'Aulaire, Ingri and Edgar. Abraham Lincoln. Garden City: Doubleday & Co., 1939.

*Ehrlich, Amy, adapted by. The Random House Book of Fairy Tales. New York: Random House, 1985.

Fleming, Denise. In the Small, Small Pond. New York: Scholastic, 1993.

Fleming, Denise. In the Tall, Tall Grass. New York: Scholastic, 1991.

Greenfield, Eloise. Honey, I Love and other love poems. New York: Harper & Row, 1978.

*Grimm, Jakob and Wilhelm. The Fisherman and His Wife. Chicago: Follett, 1969.

Grimm, Jakob. Favorite Tales from Grimm. New York: Four Winds Press, 1982.

*Gross, Ruth Belov retold by. The Emperor's New Clothes. New York: Scholastic, 1977.

Hague, Michael, comp. & illus. Michael Hague's Favorite Hans Christian Andersen Fairy Tales. New York: Henry Holt, 1981.

Hudson, Wade, ed. Pass It On - African-American Poetry for Children. New York: Scholastic, Inc.,1993.

Levinson, Riki, retold by. The Emperor's New Clothes. New York: Dutton, 1991.

McGovern, Ann. "Wanted Dead or Alive"-The True Story of Harriet Tubman. New York: Scholastic, Inc., 1965.

Mathias, Robert, retold by. The Stories of Hans Christian Andersen. Morristown: Silver Burdett, 1985.

*Mayer, Marianne, retold by. Beauty and the Beast. New York: Four Winds, 1978.

*Osborne, Mary Pope, retold by. Beauty and the Beast. New York: Scholastic, 1987.

Pallotta, Jerry. The Icky Bug Alphabet Book. Watertown: Charlesbridge, 1986.
 
 

Ringgold, Faith. Aunt Harriet's Underground Railroad in the Sky. New York: Crown, 1992.

Schroeder, Alan. Minty-A Story of Young Harriet Tubman. New York: Dial Books, 1996.

Silverstein, Shel. Where the Sidewalk Ends. New York: Harper & Row, 1974.

*Stevens, Janet, retold & illus. by. The Emperor's New Clothes. New York: Holiday House, 1985.

Viorst, Judith. Alexander, Who Used to be Rich Last Sunday. New York: Atheneum, 1978.
 

Teacher Resource

Baker, Wendy and Andrew Haslam. Make it Work! Insects. New York: Thomson Learning, 1994.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

* Denotes recommended versions of fairy tales