BCP DRAFT HIST 117

Second Grade - World Civilization - Overview - May

In May, the children will continue their study of world civilizations with a unit on modern day Japan. The geography, culture, and customs of Japan are the focus.

The following is a list of teacher references and resources, as well as, books that are suitable for reading aloud to the children. You will also find a list of additional Japanese stories and Haiku collections at the end of this overview that are nice read alouds if time permits. If in the past you have had success writing haiku with your students, you may wish to supplement this unit on Japan with a poetry writing activity.

Read Alouds

Bang, Molly. The Paper Crane. New York: Greenwillow, 1985. ISBN 0-688-04109-4

Cobb, Vicki. This Place is Crowded: Japan. New York: Walker and Comp., 1992. ISBN 0-8027- 8146-2

Haskins, Jim. Count Your Way through Japan. Minneapolis: Carolrhoda, 1987.

Kalman, Maira. Sayonara, Mrs. Kackleman. New York: Viking, 1989.

Kroll, Virginia. Pink Paper Swans. Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans, 1994. ISBN 0- 8028-5081-2

Kuklin, Susan. Kodomo: Children of Japan. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1995.

Wells, Ruth. A to Zen. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1992. ISBN 0-88708-175-4

Teacher Reference

Baines, John. Country Fact Files: Japan. Austin, TX: Steck-Vaughn, 1994.

Downer, Lesley. Countries of the World: Japan. New York: Bookwright Press, 1990.

Kaneyoshi, Nakayama. Pictorial Encyclopedia of Japanese Life and Events. New York: Gakken, 1993.

Tames, Richard. Japan: the land and its people. Morristown, NJ: Silver Burdett, 1987.

________. Passport to Japan. New York: Franklin Watts, 1988.

Zurdo, Tony. Japan: Superpower of the Pacific. New York: Dillon Press, 1991.

Additional Japanese stories

Baker, Keith. The Magic Fan. San Diego: HBJ, 1989. ISBN 0-15-250750-7

Johnson, Ryerson. Kenji and the Magic Geese. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1992.

Snyder, Dianne. The Boy of the Three-Year Nap. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1988.

Tompert, Ann. Bamboo Hats and a Rice Cake. New York: Crown, 1993.

Haiku collections

Atwood, Ann. haiku: the mood of earth. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1971.

Cassedy, Sylvia and Kunihiro Suetake. Red Dragonfly On My Shoulder. New York: HarperCollins, 1992.

Issa, Yayu, Kikaku. don't tell the scarecrow. New York: Four Winds Press, 1969.

Lewis, J. Patrick. Black Swan White Crow. New York: Atheneum, 1995.

Teacher Resources

For free posters of the Great Buddha of Kamakura and the White Egret Castle in Himeji write to:

BCP DRAFT HIST 118

Second Grade - World Civilization - Overview - May

Japan National Tourist Organization

One Rockefeller Plaza, Suite 1250

New York, NY 10020

Tel. (212) 757-5640

 

For an information packet on Japan write to:

Japan Information and Culture Center

Embassy of Japan

Lafayette Centre

1155 21st St., N.W.

Washington, D.C. 20036

In Maryland you may wish to contact the Japanese Dance Kotobuki Kai to arrange for an authentic Japanese dance performance.

4510 Sheridan St.

Riverdale, MD 20737

Attn. Yoko King

(301) 779-1488

BCP DRAFT HIST 119

Second Grade - World Civilization - Lesson 45 - Geography of Japan

Objectives

Locate the continent of Asia and the countries of China and India on a world map.

Locate Japan, the Sea of Japan, and the Pacific Ocean.

Suggested Books

Read Alouds

The following books provide a nice introduction to Japanese culture.

Cobb, Vicki. This Place is Crowded: Japan. New York: Walker and Comp., 1992.

Haskins, Jim. Count Your Way through Japan. Minneapolis: Carolrhoda, 1987.

Kalman, Maira. Sayonara, Mrs. Kackleman. New York: Viking, 1989.

Wells, Ruth. A to Zen. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1992.

Teacher Reference

The following books contain beautiful color photographs of Japan.

Kaneyoshi, Nakayama. Pictorial Encyclopedia of Japanese Life and Events. New York: Gakken, 1993.

Zurdo, Tony. Japan: Superpower of the Pacific. New York: Dillon Press, 1991.

Materials

Classroom size world map

Procedure

Tell the children that as they continue their study of world history they are going back to the continent of Asia, specifically the country of Japan. Have different children point to the continent of Asia and the country of Japan on a classroom-size world map. Ask: What do we call an area of land that is surrounded by water? (an island)

Tell the children that as they learned the last time they studied Asia, the country of Japan is an island country off the eastern coast of Asia in the Pacific Ocean. Say: Even though Japan is several islands apart from the rest of the continent, Japan is included as part of the continent of Asia.

Have a child come up to the map and point to the Pacific Ocean. Ask: What direction is the Pacific Ocean from Japan? (east) Point to the Sea of Japan as you ask: Can someone name the body of water to the west of Japan? (The Sea of Japan)

Say: Japan's closest neighbors on the continent of Asia are Russia, Korea, and China. Point out each country on the map as you say the country's name. Ask: In which direction would you have to travel from China on the continent of Asia to reach the country of Japan? (east)

Tell the children that Japan is a very mountainous country. Say: The mountains and hills in Japan take up so much room that most Japanese people live by the shore. Because of this, the communities in which Japanese people live and work are very crowded. Show the children pictures of the cities and countryside of Japan from the books listed above or consult adult reference books for pictures.

Read one of the books listed above to the children. Ask the children to tell some of the interesting things they have learned so far about Japan and the people who live there. The following are some possible questions to start the discussion. What types of food do most Japanese people eat? How do they eat their food or what do they use to eat? What are Japanese homes like? What does Japanese writing look like?

BCP DRAFT HIST 120

Second Grade - World Civilization - Lesson 46 - Geography of Japan

Objectives

Locate Tokyo on a map of Japan.

Review facts about Mt. Fuji.

Suggested Books

Read Aloud

Jacobsen, Peter Otto and Preben Sejer Kristensen. A Family in Japan. New York: Bookwright Press, 1985.

Pages 6-9 give a nice overview of life in Tokyo.

Cobb, Vicki. This Place is Crowded: Japan. New York: Walker and Comp., 1992.

Teacher Reference

Baines, John. Country Fact Files: Japan. Austin, TX: Steck-Vaughn, 1994.

Pages 9, 25, and 40 show pictures of Tokyo and there is a picture of Mt. Fuji on page 11.

Downer, Lesley. Countries of the World: Japan. New York: Bookwright Press, 1990.

Pictures of Tokyo on pages 15-17.

James, Ian. Inside Japan. New York: Franklin Watts, 1989.

This book contains color photographs that show the different land areas of Japan.

Materials

Map of Japan (see attached)

Photographs of Tokyo and Mt. Fuji

Procedure

Hand out maps of Japan to the children. Tell the children that although there are over 3,000 islands that make up the country of Japan, there are four main islands on which most Japanese live. Review the names of the four large islands--Honshu, Hokkaido, Kyushu, and Shikoku. Explain to the children that if they were to visit the different islands in Japan, they would experience different types of weather. Say: The weather gets warmer as you go south within the country of Japan. The island of Hokkaido to the north is cool in the summer and cold with snow in the winter, whereas the island of Kyushu in the south is hot in the summer and still fairly warm in the winter.

Ask: Does anyone remember the name of the largest and most well known mountain in Japan? (Mt. Fuji) Tell the children to use the key to find Mt. Fuji on their maps of Japan. Ask: On which island is Mt. Fuji located? (Honshu) Remind the children that Mount Fuji is a volcano, but hasn't erupted since 1707, over 200 years ago. Say: There are many Japanese and people from other countries who travel to Japan to climb Mt. Fuji. Mt. Fuji can only be climbed two months out of the year, July and August, when the weather is warm enough for people to climb. Show the children pictures of Mt. Fuji.

Tell the children that Mt. Fuji is so well known that one Japanese artist named Hokusai included views of Mt. Fuji in thirty-six of his prints. If possible show the children a piece of Hokusai's work that includes a view of Mt. Fuji. (A picture of one of Hokusai's prints can be found in A to Zen by Ruth Wells) Note: Woodblock printing was covered in Visual Arts

BCP DRAFT HIST 121

Second Grade - World Civilization - Lesson 46 - Geography of Japan

lessons 5 & 6 if you wish to review this type of art with the children.

Ask: Have you ever gone on a long walk through woods or up a hill and picked up a stick to use as a cane or pole to help you on your walk? (Accept a variety of answers.) Some people who climb Mt. Fuji carry sticks to help them make their way to the top. The sticks are called Fuji sticks. As people climb up the mountain, there are places along the way to stop and

get a special mark made on the stick. The Fuji sticks are then kept as souvenirs.

Tell the children the capital of Japan, Tokyo, is also located on the island of Honshu. Review with the children that a capital is a place where government leaders of a country or state meet and work. Have the children find the large dot on the island of Honshu. Tell the children that the dot shows where Tokyo is located. Write Tokyo on the board and have the children write the name Tokyo next to the dot in their map key. Tell the children that Tokyo is the world's most populated city, which means there are more people living in the city of Tokyo than any other city in the world. Explain that, like other large cities, Tokyo is a very crowded city--there are tall skyscrapers and many businesses. If possible, read pages 6-9 from A Family in Japan by Peter Otto Jacobsen and Preben Sejer Kristensen to the children.

Many things that we have in our homes or use every day were made in Japan. Japan is a center for many businesses that make things. Tell the children the names of Japanese companies and see if the children can name what that company produces (Sony--TVs, VCRs, stereo equipment, Toshiba--TVs, VCRs, stereo equipment, Yamaha--stereo equipment, Sanyo--TVs, VCRs, Suzuki--cars, Honda--cars, Toyota--cars, Nikon--cameras, Minolta--cameras). Explain to the children that all of the companies you just listed are Japanese, so many of the things we use here in the U.S. come from Japan--cars and many different kinds of electronics (televisions, stereos, and cameras).

2nd Grade - World Civ. - Lesson 46

Map of Japan























































































Mt. Fuji

Tokyo

BCP DRAFT HIST 123

Second Grade - World Civilization - Lesson 47 - Japanese flag

Objectives

Identify the Japanese flag.

Recall facts about Japan.

Materials

A picture of a Japanese flag or a handmade model of a Japanese flag

1 per child

Flag worksheet (attached)

Red crayon

Procedure

Tell the children that just as our flag has special meaning, the Japanese flag also has special meaning. Ask the children if they can name the meaning behind the parts of the U. S. flag (thirteen stripes for the thirteen original colonies; 50 stars--one for each state in our country; and the colors of the flag--red standing for courage, blue standing for justice, and white standing for liberty).

Show the children a picture of a Japanese flag. Ask: What does the reddish-orange circle in the middle of the Japanese flag remind you of? (Accept a variety of answers, but discuss until someone comes up with sun.) Tell the children that the circle representing the sun on the Japanese flag has special meaning because Japan is known as the land of the rising sun.

Explain to the children that if they were to get up and watch the sun rise, they would notice that the sun rises from the east. Write the word Nippon on the board. Explain to the children that the word Nippon is a Japanese word for Japan and it means source of the sun. Tell the children that a source is where something comes from. Explain to the children that the saying land of the rising sun therefore came about because we face the east to watch the sun rise and that is where Japan is located.

Ask the children to share with the class some of the facts they have learned about Japan. (The largest mountain in Japan is Mt. Fuji. The capital of Japan is Tokyo. Japan is an island country in Asia. The two bodies of water that border Japan are the Pacific Ocean and the Sea of Japan. Japan is known as the land of the rising sun.) List the facts on the board as the children brainstorm. Hand out a flag worksheet to each child. Ask the children to color the circle in the middle of the flag orange and red. Demonstrate how one color can be lightly applied over the other. On the two lines below the flag, have the children write two facts they have learned about Japan.

BCP DRAFT HIST 125

Second Grade - World Civilization - Lesson 48 - Japanese New Year's Celebration

Objective

Become familiar with the Japanese holiday, Shogatsu.

Suggested Books

Read Aloud

Kuklin, Susan. Kodomo: Children of Japan. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1995.

Pages 19-20 show pictures of a girl dressing in her kimono for New Year's Day and give a description of the process.

Tompert, Ann. Bamboo Hats and a Rice Cake. New York: Crown, 1993.

If possible, you may wish to read this Japanese tale aloud to the children. The tale is centered around a man's effort to obtain rice cakes, a traditional food eaten to celebrate the New Year, for his family.

Teacher Reference

Kaneyoshi, Nakayama. Pictorial Encyclopedia of Japanese Life and Events. New York: Gakken, 1993.

Pages 8-13 give information about how the Japanese celebrate the New Year holiday. This book also contains beautiful, color photographs of Japan and the Japanese people.

Zurdo, Tony. Japan: Superpower of the Pacific. New York: Dillon Press, 1991.

Materials

Kimono bookmark pattern (attached)

Tagboard

Wrapping paper, wallpaper samples, starched fabric, origami paper, or construction paper

Glue

Procedure

Tell the children that there are many festivals or celebrations held throughout the year in Japan. Explain that one of the most important is a festival that is held to celebrate the new year and is called Shogatsu (shoh gah-tsoo). Say: Just as we celebrate New Year's Eve on December 31st in the United States, in Japan, Shogatsu also begins on December 31st. Relay the following information to the children:

Japanese New Year or Shogatsu is the most important festival held in Japan. It is a time for family gatherings--including grandparents, aunts, uncles, and cousins. Just as we in the United States begin our celebration on New Year's Eve, the Japanese festival begins on New Year's Eve. At midnight on December 31 the Japanese eat noodles, which stand for long life. Many families will then go to their place of worship, such as a temple or shrine, to pray for good luck in the New Year. On the first day of the year, January 1, the Japanese receive New Year's cards from their friends and family.

Tell the children that the Japanese start preparing for the new year in December. Explain

to the children that Japanese families clean their homes very well so that they can start the new year off right. Tell the children this cleaning is much like the spring cleaning that many of their BCP DRAFT HIST 126

Second Grade - World Civilization - Lesson 48 - Japanese New Year's Celebration

own families may do. Say: The Japanese also decorate their homes in a special way for the New Year's celebration. They place twisted straw rope above the front door to bring good luck and keep bad things away in the new year. (A picture of this decoration can be found on page 63 in Japan: Superpower of the Pacific by Tony Zurdo.)

Tell the children that on January 1st Japanese families go to their shrine or temple, which is a special place to pray--like a church. During their visit to the shrine or temple, the Japanese pray for good luck throughout the year.

Explain to the children that since Shogatsu (New Year's) is one of the largest celebrations of the year, many Japanese will dress up in traditional Japanese clothing called a kimono. Show the children pictures of Japanese wearing kimonos. Tell the children that a long time ago kimonos were what the Japanese wore every day, but now kimonos are only worn for special occasions. A kimono is a robe-like dress made out of a piece of fabric that is wrapped around the body. A wide fabric belt called an obi (oh-bee) is worn across the middle of the kimono and tied in the back.

Have the children make and decorate a kimono bookmark. Use the attached patterns to cut out the body from tagboard and the kimono and obi from one of the following materials--wrapping paper, starched fabric, construction paper decorated by the children, wallpaper samples, or origami paper.

Model first and then have the children follow the directions listed below:

1. Attach the longer end of the kimono to the right, front side of the paper figure using glue or tape.

2. Wrap the kimono around the figure one and a half times and attach in the back.

2. Wrap the obi across the middle of the figure and attach in the back. (The front of the figure is the side where the V is formed by the fabric or paper.)

3. Draw a face and hair on the figure.

BCP DRAFT HIST 128

Second Grade - World Civilization - Lesson 49 - Japanese Holidays

Objective

Become familiar with the Japanese Festivals--The Doll Festival and Children's Day.

Suggested Books

Teacher Reference

Kaneyoshi, Nakayama. Pictorial Encyclopedia of Japanese Life and Events. New York: Gakken, 1993.

Pages 38-39 discuss Children's Day. There is a large, color photograph of the carp streamers on page 39. Pages 24-45 discuss Doll Festival. There is a full-page, color photograph of a doll display on page 25.

Zurdo, Tony. Japan: Superpower of the Pacific. New York: Dillon Press, 1991.

Pages 66-67 discuss Doll Festival and page 67 has a color photograph of a doll display.

Materials

Carp streamer pattern (attached) - Make patterns out of tagboard for the children to share. It would be helpful if you make a carp streamer prior to the lesson for the children to see.

Per child

2 pieces of white drawing paper or bulletin board paper

Scissors

Crayons or markers

Glue

String

Paper clips

Procedure

Review with the children what they have learned about Shogatsu. The following are some of the questions you may wish to ask: How do the Japanese prepare for the New Year's celebration? (clean and decorate their homes) What are the special clothes that Japanese people wear to celebrate the New Year? (kimonos) When do the Japanese celebrate their New Year? (Dec. 31 and Jan. 1, the same time we do) What do the Japanese people send to each other on New Year's Day? (cards)

Tell the children that there are two other holidays celebrated in Japan and they are specifically for children; one is a special day for girls and the other is a special day for boys. Say: In Japan there is a special day for girls called Doll Festival celebrated in March.

Explain that a display of dolls is set up in the home of every family that has daughters. If possible, show the children the picture of a Doll Festival display. (See suggested books above.) Tell the children that the dolls are arranged on shelves covered in red cloth. Say: The dolls are dressed to represent the emperor, empress, their family, and the royal attendants or workers. The display of dolls is kept up for one week, starting at the end of February and taken down before or on March 4th and put away for the next year. Explain that the dolls that are displayed are not to be played with, just looked at. Tell the children that Japanese girls have small parties so that their friends can come over and see their doll displays.

Tell the children that the holiday that is a special day for boys is called Boys' Festival BCP DRAFT HIST 129

Second Grade - World Civilization - Lesson 49 - Japanese Holidays

and is celebrated on May 5. Explain that the name of the holiday has been changed to include girls, so it is oftentimes now called Children's Day. Say: On Children's Day cloth or paper streamers shaped like a fish called a carp are flown from a bamboo pole in front of the homes of people with sons. Explain that the largest carp streamer is hung at the top of the pole and is for the oldest son; the smallest carp streamer is attached below for the youngest son.

Say: The carp is a fish that swims against the stream of the current. Explain that the current is the natural direction that water moves in, so to swim against the current is more difficult. Because of this the carp is a symbol of determination, strength, and courage for the Japanese. Explain that Japanese parents hope that their boys will grow strong and brave like the carp and that the streamers remind all children to overcome obstacles or difficulties.

Have the children make their own carp streamers. Show the children a finished streamer that you have made. Give each child two pieces of white drawing paper. Have the children trace the pattern onto one of the sheets. Have the children use two paper clips to hold the two sheets together and have them cut out the carp pattern. Tell the children to draw an eye on and decorate one side of each piece of paper. Next, model for the children how they will put the two sides of the fish together by gluing only the edges of the paper together; the center of the carp should remain unglued, allowing air to enter. Then have them glue their own fish together. Attach the string to the mouth of the carp with a piece of tape.

BCP DRAFT HIST 132

Second Grade - World Civilization - Lesson 50 - Origami

Objectives

Become familiar with the art of Japanese paper folding.

Create origami figures.

Suggested Books

Read Alouds

Bang, Molly. The Paper Crane. New York: Greenwillow, 1985.

Kroll, Virginia. Pink Paper Swans. Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans, 1994.

Teacher Reference

Kneissler, Irmgard. Origami: A children's book. Chicago: Childrens Press, 1992.

Nakano, Dokuohtei. (Translated by Eric Kenneway) Easy Origami. New York: Puffin, 1986.

Wells, Ruth. A to Zen. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1992.

Materials

Origami paper cut into 6 inch squares (If unable to obtain, you may use wrapping paper, copy machine paper, or any other light weight paper.)

Procedure

Tell the children that there are many beautiful art forms that have come from Japan. Remind the children that one form of Japanese art they have seen are prints made from carved wood blocks (Visual Arts Lessons 5, 6, 31). Show pictures of a wood block print. (A picture of one of Hokusai's wood block prints can be found in A to Zen by Ruth Wells.)

Explain that another Japanese art form is the art of paper folding called origami. Origami shapes and figures have been made in Japan for over three hundred years. Explain that origami started because people who lived in Japan a long time ago believed that paper had a spirit and it should therefore not be cut. In the art of origami, the paper is not cut to make shapes, it is only folded.

Give each child a 6" by 6" square. It is important that the children follow the instructions carefully, so demonstrate the folding, one step at a time, while your students follow along. Walk around and check their folds as they complete them. Below are directions for two different origami animals that the children could make.

Origami Dog

1. Hold the square with a corner pointing up.

2. Fold the paper in half, top to bottom.

3. Fold the left and right corners down to form ears.

4. Fold the bottom corner under to form a flat nose.

5. Decorate the dog's head (for example: draw eyes, a nose, put spots on its ears)









BCP DRAFT HIST 133

Second Grade - World Civilization - Lesson 50 - Origami

Origami Cat

1. Hold the square with a corner pointing up.

2. Fold the paper in half, bottom to top.

3. Fold the top corner down.

4. Fold the two remaining corners up. (see diagram below)

5. Turn figure over and decorate the cat's head.