BCP DRAFT HIST/GEO 85

Second Grade - World Civilization - Lesson 31 - India

Objectives

Locate the continent of Asia.

Become familiar with the locations of Russia, China, India, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam.

Become familiar with the caste system in India.

Suggested Books

Read Alouds

Ganeri, Anita. I Remember India: Why We Left. Austin, TX, 1995.

Hermes, Jules. The Children of India. Minneapolis: Carolrhoda, 1993.

Lewin, Ted. Sacred River. New York: Clarion, 1995.

Teacher Reference

Braquet, Anne and Martine Noblet. Tintin's Travel Diaries: India. New York: Barron's, 1994.

Ganeri, Anita. Exploration into India. New York: New Discovery, 1994.

Kalman, Bobbie. India: the culture. New York: Crabtree, 1990.

________. India: the land. New York: Crabtree, 1990.

Materials

Map of India (attached)

Crayons

Procedure

Tell the children that this month we will be studying countries other than our own. Say: We will be learning about countries on the continent of Asia, including India and China. Have a child point to the continent of Asia on a world map.

Point out the location of the following countries in Asia so that the children can begin to become familiar with the area of the world that they will be studying: Russia, China, India, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam.

Tell the children that the first country we are going to talk about is India. Say: India is easy to find because it is shaped like a triangle. Also, the country of India points to an ocean that gets its name from India. Call children up to the map to find the continent of Asia, the triangle shaped country of India, and the ocean to which it points (the Indian Ocean).

Tell the children that the country of India is a very interesting place because there are many different types of environments: very dry, treeless areas called deserts; wet forests called jungles or rain forests; and very tall mountains. Say: The tallest mountains in the world are located in India and they are called the Himalayas.

Say: The country of India gets its name from the Indus River because the first large Indian civilization or community was built along the Indus River a very long time ago. Explain that the Indus River is no longer a part of India; it is now part of the country of Pakistan (Pakistan is located to the left of India). The most important river in India is the Ganges River. The Ganges River is a special river for many of the people who live in India. Tell the children that most of the people who live in India are Hindus, which means followers of the religion, Hinduism. Say: Hindus in India believe that if you splash the water on yourself or dunk yourself in the Ganges River, the water will take away the bad things you have done, thought, or said. If possible, read Sacred River by Ted Lewin to the children if possible. It is a beautifully illustrated BCP DRAFT HIST/GEO 86

Second Grade - World Civilization - Lesson 31 - India

book with simple text that gives interesting information about the Ganges River.

Explain to the children that religion is very important to the people of India. Religious leaders or priests are considered the most important people in the Hindu culture. Tell the children

that in India there once was once a way of dividing people into groups called the caste system. Explain that the caste system is no longer legal in India, but it was once the way people of India were grouped by the job or work they did. Say: People were not allowed to marry outside their group or caste, so if you were born into a low caste you could not move to a higher one. People from lower castes were treated badly. Draw the triangle shown below on the board. Read the names and the jobs associated with each caste.

Have the children color the attached map of the country of India. Tell them to trace the Indus and the Ganges River with a blue crayon and choose a color, for instance orange or green, to color the continent of India. Also, make sure that the children color the map key in the appropriate colors.

BCP DRAFT HIST 87

Second Grade - World Civilization - Lesson 32 - Hinduism

Objectives

Become familiar with Hinduism and the festival of Diwali.

Complete a craft project.

Suggested Books

Read Aloud

Aggarwal, Manju and Gaytri Devi Goswami. I am a HINDU. New York: Franklin Watts, 1985.

(You may wish to read selections from this book, which presents the Hindu religion from a child's perspective and contains interesting photographs.)

Teacher Reference

Ganeri, Anita. Hindu: Beliefs and Cultures. Danbury, CT: Children's Press, 1996.

________. What Do We Know About Hinduism? New York: Peter Bedrick, 1996.

Kadodwala, Dilip. World Religions Hinduism. New York: Thomson, 1995.

Materials

Activity 1

Playdough or salt dough--1 cup flour, cup salt, 6 to 7 tablespoons water, 1 tablespoon vegetable oil, drops of orange food coloring

Yellow tagboard, a birthday candle, or a segment of a popsicle stick

Activity 2

Chalk or plastic squeeze bottles filled with a mixture of flour and water

Dark piece of construction paper

Procedure

Have a child point to the continent of Asia and then point to the country of India. Ask if someone can name the two rivers of India that we talked about in the last lesson (Indus and Ganges Rivers). Review with the children the importance of the two rivers from Lesson 31, making sure to review the importance of the Ganges River to people who are followers of the Hindu religion. Read the following to the children:

 

Hinduism is one of the oldest religions in the world. . . . The name Hindu was first used to describe the people who lived near the Indus River. The beliefs of these people became a religion and a way of life which spread throughout India.(1)

Tell the children that most followers of religions we are familiar with in the United States believe in one god, but the Hindu religion is different in that people who are followers of Hinduism believe in many gods and goddesses. Explain to the children that the Hindus believe in

one main superior being or god, called Brahman and there are many gods and goddesses that are part of Brahman. The three main gods that represent different characteristics of Brahman are: Brahma (the creator of the universe), Vishnu (the preserver of the universe), and Shiva (the destroyer of evil or the changer).

Also, tell the children that just as the Bible is an important book for many people, the

Hindus have a special book called the Rig Veda. (The name Rig Veda means song of knowledge.) The Rig Veda is made up of about one thousand hymns that praise the ancient gods

and goddesses. Explain that hymns are something like poems that are sung and Hindus today still sing hymns from the Rig Veda as part of weddings and funerals.

In India, festivals are a big part of the Hindu way of life--hundreds of festivals are held throughout the year. One of the biggest festivals is Diwali. Diwali is the Indian New Year and is a festival of lights. Diwali is celebrated for five days at the end of October or the beginning of November. Say: Indian people do many things to prepare for the Diwali. They clean their houses; hang garlands of flowers, which are flowers that are put on string, around their doorways; and draw white designs on the floor near the front doors of their houses for good luck in the new year. Explain that light also plays a large role in the celebration of Diwali. Little clay oil lamps are placed all around each person's house--along the windowsills, doorways, sidewalks, and even rooftops--and are lit at night. People take some of these clay oil lamps to nearby rivers or lakes and set them afloat in the water.

Have the children complete one of the following projects:

1. Have the children make clay oil lamps. Make playdough or salt dough using the following recipe or one that with which you are familiar. (1 cup flour, cup salt, 6 to 7 tablespoons water, 1 tablespoon vegetable oil, drops of orange food coloring to give the dough a clay-like appearance.) Model for the children how they should make small bowl-shaped lamps by flattening small pieces of the dough and bending the edges up. Give each child a yellow piece of tagboard cut in the shape of a flame, a birthday candle with the wick cut off, or a segment of a popsicle stick, etc. to represent the flame. Have the children place the "flame" in the center of their lamps. Line up the lamps on the windowsill in the classroom as would be done in an Indian home in celebration of Diwali.

2. Have the children make their own good luck designs by using chalk or plastic squeeze bottles filled with a mixture of flour and water to draw a design on a dark piece of construction paper.

BCP DRAFT HIST 89

Second Grade - World Civilization - Lesson 33 - Buddhism

Objective

Identify the founder of Buddhism, Buddha.

Suggested Books

Read Alouds

Coatsworth, Elizabeth. The Cat Who Went to Heaven. New York: Aladdin, 1990.

Hodges, Margaret. The Golden Deer. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1992.

This story comes from the Jataka, which are stories about the different forms that Buddha took before he came to the world in the shape of a man and became the Buddha.

Martin, Rafe. Foolish Rabbit's Big Mistake. New York: Scholastic, 1985.

A Jataka story.

Raimondo, Lois. The Little Lama of Tibet. New York: Scholastic, 1994.

This photographic essay tells the story of a child who is a high lama or Buddhist priest.

Teacher Reference

Hewitt, Catherine. World Religions: Buddhism. New York: Thomson, 1995.

Teacher Resource

For a free poster of a statue of Buddha--the Great Buddha of Kamakura--write to:

Japan National Tourist Organization

One Rockefeller Plaza, Suite 1250

New York, NY 10020

Tel. (212) 757-5640

Teacher Information

Since age appropriate reading material on Buddhism is somewhat hard to find I have included two passages from What Your 1st Grader Needs to Know and What Your 2nd Grader Needs to Know, which give interesting background information for the children.

Procedure

Tell the children that another important religion that began in India is Buddhism. Say: The religion, Buddhism, started in India, but has spread to many countries in Asia. Point out the countries in Asia that Buddhism spread to on the map (Sri Lanka, Burma, Thailand, Tibet, Cambodia, Laos).

Ask: Does anyone remember if the followers of Hindu believe in one god or many gods? (many gods) Explain that although there are many things that Hinduism and Buddhism have in common, there are distinct differences. One difference is that Buddhists are followers of one main figure or person, the Buddha. Read the following passage to the children:

 

The man who became the Buddha was the son of a King in the mountains of India. He gave up being a ruler to gain wisdom and become a teacher.

To find his own answers to life he decided to think quietly. It has been said that he sat beneath a tree for ninety-eight days! Don't you think that is a long time to keep quiet?

By the end of ninety-eight days he had become wise or

"enlightened." The word "Buddha" means "the Enlightened One." He began to teach and many believed him. One of the things Buddha taught is that we should not hurt any living thing. Buddha's teachings spread into a great part of Asia. They are still followed by many people there.(2)

Another difference between Hinduism and Buddhism is that Buddhists reject the caste

system. Ask: Can someone tell me what we learned about the caste system from our last lesson? Since Buddhists believe that we should care about every living thing, they could not believe in a

caste system that says some people are better than others just because of the family they were born into.

Tell the children that Buddhists try to care about and be kind to humans and all other living things, from the tallest giraffe to the smallest bug. If possible read The Golden Deer by Margaret Hodges or Foolish Rabbit's Big Mistake by Rafe Martin to the children. These stories come from the Jataka, which are a collection of stories about the different forms that Buddha appeared as before he came to the world as a man and became the Buddha. Tell the children that the old stories from the Jataka tell about the type of animal that Buddha appeared as, what he did as that animal, and the affect he had on the characters with which he came into contact. Buddha came to the earth as different types of animals--a rabbit, a deer, an elephant, a monkey, a horse, and a dog.

Explain to the children that although Buddha lived a very long time ago, his teachings have been followed by people ever since. Tell the children that one king of India was so impressed with the ideas of Buddha that he helped to spread Buddhism to many areas of Asia. Read the following passage to the children:

 

When Asoka was a young king, he fought lots of battles with his army. But after one war, he became sad because he realized that many people are hurt by battles. Even though Buddha had been dead a long time, Asoka heard about Buddha's teachings. . . Asoka listened to Buddha's teachings and stopped making war. He built hospitals all over India for people and animals. He told his workers to plant trees and dig wells for the people. He even set up houses along the roads for people who were tired from walking long distances.

Because Asoka believed Buddha's teachings, he decided that Indians should also learn more about Buddha. Asoka had Buddha's words carved on pillars and put them in places where many Indian people could read them. He also sent Buddhist priests in the direction of Greece and China to teach other people about Buddha's teaching. Because of Asoka, BCP DRAFT HIST 91

Second Grade - World Civilization - Lesson 33 - Buddhism

Buddha's ideas spread all over Asia and Buddhism is still an important religion today.(3)

Ask: Did Buddha's ideas have a good or bad affect on the way Asoka ruled his country? Have the children give examples of why the changes were good or bad.

Optional Activity

If possible, you may want to read The Cat Who Went to Heaven by Elizabeth Coatsworth to the children. It is a chapter book so it would have to be read over the course of three or four days. The book tells the story of a painter who is commissioned to paint a mural for a Buddhist temple. As the book gives the story of the painter, it also tells about the life of Siddhartha Gautama, Buddha.

BCP DRAFT HIST 92

Second Grade - World Civilization - Lesson 34 - China & Confucius

Objective

Locate the country of China on a world map.

Suggested Books

Read Alouds

Haskins, Jim. Count Your Way through China. Minneapolis: Carolrhoda, 1987.

Jacobsen, Petter Otto and Preben Sejer Kristensen. A Family in China. New York: Bookwright, 1986.

Teacher Reference

Entwistle, Theodore Rowland. Confucius and Ancient China. New York: Bookwright Press, 1987.

McKillop, Beth. Great Civilizations: China 1400 BC-AD 1911. New York: Franklin Watts, 1988.

Waterlow, Julia. The Ancient Chinese. New York: Thomson Learning, 1994.

Materials

Sentence strip (With Do unto others as you would have them do unto you written on it.)

Procedure

Say: The next country in Asia we are going to study is China. Point to China on a world map. Have the children compare the size of China to the size of the United States. Have a few children come up to the map and point to the country of China. Tell the children that the country of China is a little bit bigger than the United States. Say: There are two important rivers in China, the Yellow River and the Yangtze River. Point out the two rivers on a world map. Explain that just as a long time ago people decided to live next to the Indus and Ganges Rivers, the early settlers in China built their communities along the Yellow and Yangtze Rivers.

Tell the children that one person who lived during this time long ago in China was a philosopher named Confucious. Explain that a philosopher is someone who thinks deeply about everyday things and life. During the time that Confucius lived, there was a great deal of fighting between the rulers from different parts of China. Read the following passage to the children:

China was rich, but most of the people were not happy. There was too much fighting about who would be emperor. This wasted China's wealth and kept most of the people poor. Confucius knew that well, because his own family was very poor.

To make China peaceful and happy, Confucius taught the rules of "right living." Peace and wisdom were very important, Confucius said. So was respect for parents. Slowly, these teachings spread across China. People there have believed them for over two thousand years! During much of that time Confucius's rules have helped to keep peace.(4)

BCP DRAFT HIST 93

Second Grade - World Civilization - Lesson 34 - China & Confucius

One of Confucius's sayings is "What you do not wish for yourself, do not do to others." This is like a saying that some of you may know--Do unto others as you would have

them do unto you. Write the saying on a sentence strip and display in the classroom. Ask: Have you ever heard this saying before? Where? Students may say at church or in the Bible, etc. If the saying is not familiar to the students try paraphrasing it as: Treat other people the way you want to be treated, etc.

Tell the children that this saying is known as the Golden Rule. It is said in different ways by different people but it means the same thing. As Confucious said it is a very important rule for us all to follow as we live together. Have the children create sayings from the rules they have in their school and/or classroom that convey important ideas for ways to work together and enjoy school.

 

BCP DRAFT HIST 94

Second Grade - World Civilization - Lesson 35 - Chin Dynasty, The Great Wall

Objective

Become familiar with the accomplishments of Emperor Ch'in Shih Huang Ti.

Suggested Books

Read Aloud

Fisher, Leonard Everett. The Great Wall of China. New York: Macmillan, 1986.

Teacher Reference

McKillop, Beth. Great Civilizations: China 1400 BC-AD 1911. New York: Franklin Watts, 1988.

Waterlow, Julia. The Ancient Chinese. New York: Thomson Learning, 1994.

Procedure

Review with the children important facts about Confucius. Say: Confucius was a philosopher. Ask: What is a philosopher? What are some of the things that were important to Confucius? (wisdom, peace) Have a child point to the continent of Asia and then the country of China.

Tell the children that around the time that Confucius lived, China's first emperor came to be the leader of the country. Say: An emperor is like a king. The first emperor of China was named Ch'in Shih Huang Ti and the time in which he ruled was called the Chin Dynasty. Explain that the emperor made many changes in China, some good and some bad. Say: The emperor's greatest desire was to unite China. Tell the children about the following changes that he made. Be sure to ask the children if they think the changes were good and if not what was bad about them.

Emperor Ch'in Shih Huang Ti:

1. Standardized the system of weights, measures, and coins.

2. Made a law to develop a common system of writing, so that people in one part of China would be able to read what was written by another person in a different area of China.

2. Called for the burning of all books except those on medicine, farming, and forecasting the future. Emperor Qin did not want any ideas in print with which he disagreed.

3. Had the Great Wall built to protect China from being attacked. Guards were posted along the Great Wall as lookouts and they used smoke signals to tell the soldiers if they spotted any invaders coming to attack.

4. Had a system of roads built to make transportation throughout their country easier.

 

If possible read The Great Wall of China by Leonard Everett Fisher aloud to the children. This book not only tells about the Great Wall of China, but also describes the changes brought about during the Ch'in Dynasty. You may also wish to show the children pictures of the actual wall from National Geographic or reference books on the Great Wall of China. Tell the children that The Great Wall is the longest wall in the world and is the only man-made thing on the earth that can be seen from outer space. The Great Wall was made by fixing old walls and attaching them to new ones to make one long wall. Explain that if The Great Wall were built here in the BCP DRAFT HIST 95

Second Grade - World Civilization - Lesson 35 - Chin Dynasty, The Great Wall

United States it could stretch all the way down the eastern seaboard--from Maine to Florida. Point out how long this would be on a map of the United States.

Tell the children that building the Great Wall was a huge accomplishment and in next dynasty many more accomplishments followed. Say: The next dynasty to rule China was the Han dynasty. Tell the children that the time during the Han Dynasty was a time of invention; for instance paper making and an earthquake detector were invented.

BCP DRAFT HIST 96

Second Grade - World Civilization - Lesson 36 - Chinese New Year

Objective

Become familiar with the customs associated with Chinese New Year.

Suggested Books

Read Alouds

Behrens, June. Gung Hay Fat Choy. Chicago: Childrens Press, 1982.

Bernhard, Emery. Happy New Year! New York: Lodestar, 1996.

Chin, Steven A. Dragon Parade. New York: Steck-Vaughn, 1993.

Packard, Mary. A Visit to China. New York: Golden Book, 1991.

Waters, Kate and Madeline Slovenz-Low. Lion Dancer: Ernie Wan's Chinese New Year. New York: Scholastic, 1990.

Teacher Resource

Grace & St. Peter's Episcopal Church has a Chinese New Year's celebration every year including the Lion Dance. Contact Lillian Kim at 539-1395.

Material

Per child

1 sheet and 1 strip of construction paper

Scissors

Glue

Procedure

Say: Remember when we studied the Indian holiday of Diwali. Ask: Who remembers what Diwali is in celebration of? (the new year) Tell the children that the Chinese also have a special holiday to celebrate the new year. Say: Chinese New Year is celebrated between mid-January and March, which is the beginning of spring in China. The new year's celebration is a time for attending family reunions, honoring family members who have passed away, and thanking the gods for their blessings. Explain to the children that the Chinese honor and show respect for their dead relatives because they believe that family members who have passed away still watch over and protect their living relatives.

Ask: When do people in the United States celebrate the new year? What do people do in the U.S. to celebrate New Year's Eve? (stay up until midnight, watch the ball drop in Times Square, get together with friends and family, watch the New Year's Day parade). Read aloud to the children Gung Hay Fat Choy by June Behrens, The Lion Dancer by Kate Waters and Madeline Slovenz-Low, or A Visit to China by Mary Packard. All of these books give wonderful descriptions of the Chinese New Year and the first two listed contain photographs of actual Chinese New Year parades. If you are unable to obtain one of these books you may wish to read the following description to the children:

About ten days before the New Year, families and businesses begin sweeping away the old year by cleaning out their houses and shops. Artists paint new poems on red paper for people to place in their homes and

BCP DRAFT HIST 97

Second Grade - World Civilization - Lesson 36 - Chinese New Year

shops. Large branches of plum blossoms are bought to decorate the homes much like Christmas trees in the West.

On New Year's Eve, family members gather together for a feast and to welcome in the new year. Firecrackers explode to frighten away evil spirits and to celebrate joy and happiness. New Year's Day is a time for remembering ancestors and for visiting close friends and relatives. The children wait in anticipation to see who will stop by and bring them red envelopes filled with good luck money. Lion dances are performed in the

streets to bands of gong and drum players, accompanied by more

explosions of firecrackers. Lion dances are processional-like dances in which a person parades underneath a hand-crafted lion or dragon head and other people often trail behind with its body made of colorful streamers.(5)

Write the words "Gung Hay Fat Choy" on the board. Explain to the children that these words mean "Happy New Year" in Chinese. Have the children practice wishing each other happy new year in Chinese. Tell the children that the Chinese New Year's celebration ends with the Lantern Festival. Lanterns of all shapes, colors and sizes are hung along the streets and in the family homes, and in the evening there is a parade that is led by a giant dragon made out of brightly painted materials.

Have the children make Chinese lanterns out of paper. Give each child a sheet of construction paper (for the lantern) and a strip of construction paper (for a lantern handle). Tell the children to follow these directions:

1. Fold the paper in half and cut across the paper on the folded side as shown below.

2. Unfold the paper, hold lengthwise, and glue or staple the shorter edges together to form a cylinder (the fold will be across the center of the lantern).

3. Attach the strip of construction across the top of the lantern in the shape of a handle.















Additional Activities

1. Have the children make dragon masks, modeled after the ones used in the Dragon Parade on the last day of Chinese New Year.

2. Make red envelopes out of a square of red construction paper. Place a dime or play money in the envelopes to give to the children or for the children to exchange just as the Chinese do for good luck in the new year.

BCP DRAFT HIST/GEO 98

Second Grade - World Civilization - Lesson 37 - Geography of Japan

Objectives

Locate the continent of Asia and the countries of China and India on a world map.

Locate Japan, the Sea of Japan, and the Pacific Ocean.

Suggested Books

Teacher Reference

Tames, Richard and Sheila. Japan: Country Topics for Craft Projects. New York: Franklin Watts, 1994.

Tames, Richard. Passport to Japan. New York: Franklin Watts, 1988.

Materials

1 per child

Map of Japan (attached)

Procedure

Have different children point to the continent of Asia and the countries of India and China on a classroom-size world map. Say: We are going to learn about the geography of another country in Asia, the country of Japan. Show the children on a world map that the country of Japan is an island country off the eastern coast of Asia in the Pacific Ocean. Tell the children that Japan is about the size of the state of California. Say: Japan's closest neighbors on the continent of Asia are Russia, Korea, and China. Point out each country on the map as you say the country's name.

Have a child come up to the map and point to the Pacific Ocean. Tell the children that the Pacific Ocean is to the east of the island of Japan, and the body of water to the left of Japan is the Sea of Japan. Explain to the children that the country of Japan is made up of four large islands (Honshu, Hokkaido, Kyushu, and Shikoku) and many more small islands--about 3,900.

Tell the children the highest peak in Japan is on the island of Honshu and is called Mount Fuji. Point out the location of Mt. Fuji on the world map. Say: Mount Fuji is a volcano, but it hasn't erupted since 1707, that's over 200 years ago. Tell the children that Mount Fuji has snow on the top of it all year. Say: There are many people who travel to Japan to climb Mt. Fuji, but it can only be climbed two months out of the year, July and August.

Give each child a map of Japan (attached). Have the children label the Sea of Japan, the Pacific Ocean, and the country of Japan (have the children write the name across the islands). Next, have the children color the Sea of Japan and the Pacific Ocean, blue. You may also want the children to mark where Mt. Fuji would be found on their map with an X.

Tell the children that they will be learning more about the country of Japan in May.

BCP DRAFT HIST 100

Second Grade - World Civilization - India, China, Japan

Bibliography

Read Alouds

Aggarwal, Manju and Gaytri Devi Goswami. I am a HINDU. New York: Franklin Watts, 1985. *Behrens, June. Gung Hay Fat Choy. Chicago: Childrens Press, 1982.

Bernhard, Emery. Happy New Year! New York: Lodestar, 1996.

Chin, Steven A. Dragon Parade. New York: Steck-Vaughn, 1993.

*Coatsworth, Elizabeth. The Cat Who Went to Heaven. New York: Aladdin, 1990.

*Fisher, Leonard Everett. The Great Wall of China. New York: Macmillan, 1986.

Ganeri, Anita. I Remember India: Why We Left. Austin, TX, 1995.

Haskins, Jim. Count Your Way through China. Minneapolis: Carolrhoda, 1987.

Hermes, Jules. The Children of India. Minneapolis: Carolrhoda, 1993.

*Hodges, Margaret. The Golden Deer. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1992.

Jacobsen, Petter Otto and Preben Sejer Kristensen. A Family in China. New York: Bookwright, 1986.

*Lewin, Ted. Sacred River. New York: Clarion, 1995.

*Martin, Rafe. Foolish Rabbit's Big Mistake. New York: Scholastic, 1985.

*Packard, Mary. A Visit to China. New York: Golden Book, 1991.

Raimondo, Lois. The Little Lama of Tibet. New York: Scholastic, 1994.

*Waters, Kate and Madeline Slovenz-Low. Lion Dancer: Ernie Wan's Chinese New Year. New York: Scholastic, 1990.

Teacher Reference

Braquet, Anne and Martine Noblet. Tintin's Travel Diaries: India. New York: Barron's, 1994.

Entwistle, Theodore Rowland. Confucius and Ancient China. New York: Bookwright Press, 1987.

Ganeri, Anita. Exploration into India. New York: New Discovery, 1994.

________. Hindu: Beliefs and Cultures. Danbury, CT: Children's Press, 1996.

________. What Do We Know About Hinduism? New York: Peter Bedrick, 1996.

Hewitt, Catherine. World Religions: Buddhism. New York: Thomson, 1995.

Kadodwala, Dilip. World Religions Hinduism. New York: Thomson, 1995.

Kalman, Bobbie. India: the culture. New York: Crabtree, 1990.

________. India: the land. New York: Crabtree, 1990.

McKillop, Beth. Great Civilizations: China 1400 BC-AD 1911. New York: Franklin Watts, 1988.

Tames, Richard and Sheila. Japan: Country Topics for Craft Projects. New York: Franklin Watts, 1994.

Tames, Richard. Passport to Japan. New York: Franklin Watts, 1988.

Waterlow, Julia. The Ancient Chinese. New York: Thomson Learning, 1994.





* Titles marked with an asterisk are suggested as part of a lesson.

1. Manju Aggarwal and Gaytri Devi Goswami. I am a Hindu. (New York: Franklin Watts, 1985), p. 6.

2. E. D. Hirsch. What Your 1st Grader Needs to Know. (New York: Dell, 1991), 107-108.

3. E. D. Hirsch. What Your 2nd Grader Needs to Know. (New York: Dell, 1991), 123.

4. E. D. Hirsch. What Your 1st Grader Needs to Know. (New York: Dell, 1991), 108.

5. Juliana Y. Yuan. Our Global Village: China. (St. Louis, MO: Milliken, 1992), 17.