Third Grade - Visual Arts - Overview - March
 
The Persistence of Memory by Salvador Dali and The Scream by Edvard Munch are introduced this month. Students may already be familiar with these paintings because both have been featured in national advertising campaigns. As a part of each of the two lessons, students are invited to create their own interpretive drawings.
The January Overview provides sources for reproductions of the aforementioned paintings.
 
In April, the art of Ancient Rome will be studied.
 
 
March Resources

 
Edward Munch, "The Scream"

 
PW 28x20 $15

 
BT 30x20 $16, 32x24 $20

 
IC 32x24 $20

 
Salvador Dali, "The Persistence of Memory"

 
BT 22x28 $16, 24x34 $26

 
SW 22x28 $9.50

 
IM 22x28 $18

 
PO 24x27 $19

 
BM 24x32 $20

 
IC 24x32 $20

 
MA 24x32 $20

 
 

 

 
MA
Modernart Editions
100 Snake Hill Road
West Nyak, NY 10994
914-358-7605
800-331-3749, Fax: 914-358-3208

 
BM
Bruce McGaw Graphics
389 West Nyack Road
West Nyack, NY 10994 914-353-8600
800-221-4813, Fax: 800-446-8230

 
BT
Bruce Teleky, Inc.
625 Broadway
New York, NY 10012-4436
212-677-2559
800-835-3539, Fax: 212-677-2253

 
IC
Image Conscious
147 10th St.
San Francisco, CA 94103
415-626-1555
800-532-2333, Fax: 415-626-2481

 
PW
Poster Warehouse
3601 E. Broadway
Tucson, AZ 85716
602-795-5750
800-795-5714, Fax: 602-795-1685

 
IM
Image Masters
5034 N. Pkwy. Calabasas
Calabasas, CA 91302
818-22-9600
800-535-5335, Fax: 818-222-9222

 
PO
Poster Originals Ltd.
330 Hudson Street
New York, NY 10013
212-620-1522
800-638-0008, Fax: 212-627-3324

 
SW
Shorewood Fine Arts
27 Glen Road
Sandy Hook, CT 06482-0319
203-426-8100; Fax 203-426-0867
All posters are $9.50 each for school orders. When ordering 5 or more posters, the price reduces to $8 each. Postage and handling $3.50, no matter how many posters are ordered.

 
 
Third Grade - Visual Arts - Lesson 23 - Dali's The Persistence of Memory
Objectives
Observe the use of line, light and color in the painting.
Identify the foreground, middle ground and background of the painting.
Create a surreal drawing or picture.

Materials
Reproduction of the painting The Persistence of Memory
Object for drawing activity
Drawing paper, pencils (crayons, brushes and paint - optional)
Additional Activity
Clear, uncluttered pictures from magazines and catalogs
Paper, scissors, glue
 
Suggested Books
Venezia, Mike. Salvador Dali. Chicago: Children's Press, 1993.
Another selection in Venezia' wonderful Getting to Know the World's Greatest Artists series; a great source of information and humorous side comments. A large reproduction of The Persistence of Memory can be found on pages 4 and 5.
Yenawine, Philip. Stories. New York: The Museum of Modern Art, 1991.
A variety of paintings housed at The Museum of Modern Art, NY, are examined for the stories they tell. A small reproduction of The Persistence of Memory is included on p. 5.
Teacher Resource
Kohl, MaryAnn F. and Kim Solga. Discovering Great Artists: Hands-On Art for Children in the Styles of the Great Masters. Bellingham, WA: Bright Ring, 1996.
This delightful book includes brief biographical notes on artists and reproductions of their works (in black-and-white only, unfortunately), as well as directions for projects related to artists' styles and techniques. Page 78 includes information on Dali and an activity called "Dream Photographs."


Teacher Reference
Gardner, Louise. Art Through the Ages II: Renaissance and Modern Art. New York: Harcourt Brace, 1991.
Useful for background information, this book includes reproductions of many paintings, unfortunately most are too small for effective sharing with a class. Pages 983-985 include information on Dali and a small reproduction of The Persistence of Memory.


Website
www.mcs.csuhayward.edu/~malek/Dali.html
Information on Dali's life and reproductions of many of his paintings, including The Persistence of Memory.
 
Teacher Background
Salvador Felipe Jacinto Dali y Domenech was born in Spain on May 11, 1904 and died on January 23, 1989. Dali lived in the United States for a time, but spent most of his life in Spain. In addition to painting surreal pictures, he was an accomplished film maker who created stories in the same unreal, dream-like quality as his art.
 
Procedure
Begin the lesson by asking students what they would say if they saw a cow in a ballet dress or a cat walking on two legs and wearing a suit. Ask: Would you say "unbelievable," or "impossible," or "I must be dreaming"? Would you ever expect to see such a thing in real life?
Write the word "surreal" on the board. Pronounce the word and tell the students that this is the name that is given to art that is unbelievable or unreal. Tell them that dream-like is another way to describe this kind of art. Explain that unlike expressionists who try in their art to show the emotions they feel, Surrealists show in their art that which they imagine or dream about. Real things therefore, are often shown in bizarre ways, like a cow in a ballet tutu.
Display the painting The Persistence of Memory. Ask students: Do the things in this painting look real? Allow time for discussion. Point out to students that some of the objects in the painting are real objects (the watches), but their appearance has been changed. Ask: Have you ever seen a watch melt in this way? What does it look like has happened to everything in the painting? Allow the students to look at the painting for several minutes directing them to look at color, light and line. Allow the students to discuss their observations with a partner, then have the students answer the following questions or ones of your own choosing.
 
Are there more straight lines or curved lines in the painting? (Have a student identify and point out several examples of each kind of line.)
Are there more living or non-living subjects in the painting?
From which direction does the light in the picture seem to be coming? (Note shadows.) What do you think is causing the light?
What time of day do you think it is supposed to be in the painting?
Are there more cool colors or warm colors in the painting?
Are the colors dark or bright?
Which objects are in the foreground, the middle ground and the background?
Are there things in the painting that look the way they would normally look? (Have a student identify and point to these objects.)
 
Tell the students that the painting is named The Persistence of Memory. Ask students to tell what they think the title means. Ask: Does time have anything to do with memory? (Be sure that the students know what persistence means. If necessary, explain that to persist means to last, so persistence is the act or quality of lasting.) Tell the students that it was painted by a Spanish artist named Salvador Dali (DAH-lee). Ask a student to identify Dali's birthplace. (Share any biographical information about Dali that you may wish at this time.)
Ask students to think about the speed at which time passes in their dreams. Ask: Do things seem to happen at a normal speed or are they speeded up or slowed down in your dreams? Do out-of-the-ordinary things happen in your dreams? Allow several minutes for the students to
respond.
Remind the students of The Adventures of Alice in Wonderland. Have them recall that Alice dreamed about amazing creatures who lived in Wonderland. Invite students to share the descriptions of any other dream characters they may know from literature.
Draw the students' attention back to the watches. Remind students that Dali made them look different by painting them to look like they were melting. Ask: How else could he have made them look different? (Possible answers are: enlarged them to enormous proportions, changed the numerals to pictures or letters, painted them unusual colors, etc.) Ask students to think about what a chair might look like in a Dali painting. Ask: How could you make a chair look surreal? (Possible answers are: very long legs, arms and legs on the chair look like the legs of an animal or the arms and legs of a person, a face on the back of the chair, etc.) Suggest to the students that they scrunch their eyes as they look at a chair, or hold their heads tilted to the side as they look. This may help them to "see" the object in a different way.
Choose an object for the students to draw in a surreal manner. Be sure that the object is large enough for all students to see, or one that you have a number of, so each student has his or her own. Display the object in the center of the room or somewhere that it is visible to all. Tell the students that as they draw, to make any changes they wish in the object so that it looks the way it might if it were seen in a dream. You may wish to have the students sketch in pencil first, then do a second drawing (or painting) in color. Display the pictures with an appropriate title like "Surreal Chair (or other object)."
 
Additional Activity (adapted from Discovering Great Artists...)
In the spirit of Dali's surreal art, have the students create surreal animals and people by combining cutout magazine pictures with sketches. For example, students could use the cutout of an animal's head and draw a body dressed in a suit or ballet clothes, or they could attach a drawing of a person's head to an animal's body. Encourage students to be creative and to choose appropriate names for their creations.
 
Third Grade - Visual Arts - Lesson 24 - Munch's The Scream
Objectives
Observe Munch's use of color, line, and texture.
Create a drawing that expresses a particular emotion through the use of line and color.
 
Materials
Reproduction of the painting The Scream
Drawing paper
Crayons
Tempera and brushes (optional)
 
Suggested Books
Teacher Resource
Kohl, MaryAnn F. and Kim Solga. Discovering Great Artists: Hands-On Art for Children in the Styles of the Great Masters. Bellingham, WA: Bright Ring, 1996.
This delightful book includes brief biographical notes on artists and reproductions of their works (in black-and-white only, unfortunately), as well as directions for projects related to artists' styles and techniques. Page 59 includes information on Munch and an activity related to expressionist art.
Teacher Reference
Gardner, Louise. Art Through the Ages II: Renaissance and Modern Art. New York: Harcourt Brace, 1991.
Useful for background information, this book includes reproductions of many paintings, unfortunately most are too small for effective sharing with a class. Page 944 includes information on Munch and a copy of the lithograph The Scream.
Website
http://sunsite.unc.edu/wm/paint/auth/munch//
Includes information on Munch's life and reproductions of some of his paintings, including The Scream (aka The Cry).
 
Teacher Background
Edvard Munch was born in Norway in 1863 and died in 1944. He was both a painter and graphic artist, oftentimes creating the same composition as both a painting and a lithograph. He felt the pain of life deeply, saying that he painted the impressions of emotions that formed on his inner eye. He felt that man had no control over his life.
 
Teacher Note
The activity included in this lesson may be done in crayon alone, but the addition of tempera would make the pictures more striking. You may wish to set up a painting station where students could go and add to their paintings after they have completed the crayon work.
 
Procedure
Begin the lesson by asking students to show a look of happiness, sadness, surprise, fear, anxiety, anger, etc. After they have tried several, ask them what they did to show those different emotions. (Answers will vary, but students should come to some agreement that their facial expressions changed.) Write the word "expression" on the board. Ask students to define the word and write their definitions next to it. ("A facial look or vocal intonation showing personal feeling" is one definition.)
Next, write the word "expressionist" on the board. Tell the students that this refers to a particular type of artist. (They may recall that Mary Cassatt was an impressionist [impression of reality.]) Ask: What would you expect of the art of someone who is called an expressionist? (emotion and feeling expressed, abstract forms, violent colors, displays the innermost feelings of the artist) Add the students' ideas about expressionist artists to the board.
Tell the students that as they might suspect, artists who are classified as expressionists are people who usually have had life experiences that left them with very strong emotions. These emotions might be anger, anxiety (being on edge) or frustration. Explain that while some people might have chosen to write or speak about these experiences, expressionist artists chose to "talk' about their feelings through paint and paper. Remind them of Matisse and his wonderful cut-outs. Point out that even while he was confined to bed, he created colorful exciting collages with unusual shapes and colors. Have students recall that Matisse's collages were lively, perhaps expressing how he wished his entire body could be.
Write the name Edvard Munch (Moonch) on the board. Tell students that Munch was born in Norway many years ago. Explain that his life was very sad because both his mother and his sister died when he was very young. Ask them to think about what he might paint if his life was very sad and he was very unhappy about it. Ask them to think about how a person might feel and act if they were very unhappy and felt that they would never feel better.
Display the painting The Scream. Ask students if they have ever seen the painting before. (The Scream has been used in several advertising campaigns recently so students may be familiar with the painting. In fact they may not have even realized that it was a painting when they initially saw it.) Ask if anyone knows the name of the painting and if not, ask what they think would be a good name. Ask students to describe what they think Munch was trying to tell in his painting. Ask: Who do you think the person in the painting is supposed to be? Does the person look like any particular person? If not, why? What was the artist telling us? Might we all feel this way sometimes? Why has this person covered his or her ears?
Write the words "color,"Aline," and "texture"on the board. Tell the students to look carefully at the painting and notice how Munch used all three. After allowing a few minutes for observation, tell students to turn to a partner and talk what they each noticed. After several minutes, ask students to share their observations leading them with questions like the following:
Did the artist use warm colors or cool colors?
Are the colors bright or dull?
What kind of lines are used, straight or curved?
Are there many lines or just a few?
What do the lines of color seem to be doing?
Are the lines thick or thin?
Does the face of the person seem to have a different texture than the sky?
Ask the students to think about how the lines in a painting might look if the artist was trying to show anger. How might they look for joy? for fear? for loneliness? List several different emotions on the board. Provide paper and crayons and allow students to try using lines alone to portray the different emotions.
After allowing students to practice and share their ideas, tell students that they are to each select an emotion to portray in a crayon drawing (or crayon and paint picture). Explain that The Scream was done in crayon and tempera, pointing out the smooth crayon lines under the paint. Remind them that Munch showed so much in the painting with just his use of line and color. Challenge them to express an emotion through the use of line and color, without worrying about putting a lot of detail in the subject of the painting.
When students have completed their work, display the pictures with an appropriate title like "Feelings" or "Sometimes, I just want to..." and complete the sentence under each picture (shout for joy; laugh with happiness; yell in anger; etc.).
 
Bibliography
 
Student Reference
Venezia, Mike. Salvador Dali. Chicago: Childrens Press, 1993. (0-516-022962)
Yenawine, Philip. Stories. New York: The Museum of Modern Art, 1991. (0-87070-178-9)
 
Teacher Resource
Kohl, MaryAnn F. and Kim Solga. Discovering Great Artists: Hands-On Art for Children in the Styles of the Great Masters. Bellingham,WA: Bright Ring, 1996. (0-935607-09-9)
 
Teacher Reference
Gardner, Louise. Art Through the Ages II: Renaissance and Modern Art. New York: Harcourt Brace, 1991. (0-15-503771-4)