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Kindergarten - Science - Plants - Overview

The science lessons for April will introduce children to basic plant growth. These lessons will be continued in May with the addition of farming and how some food comes from farms as crops. The biography of George Washington Carver is included this month.

The teacher will need to do some advanced preparation prior to these lessons. You will need to have four established lima bean plants prior to teaching Science Lesson 35. Individual student milk cartons will need to be collected prior to Science Lesson 36. A variety of seeds will need to be collected prior to Science Lesson 36.

BCP DRAFT SCI 73

Kindergarten - Science - Lesson 35 - Plants

Objectives

Review the needs of animals.

Hypothesize the needs of plants.

Set up experiments to test hypotheses.

Teacher Advanced Preparation

Plant several lima beans in four pots. When the beans have sprouted, remove all but the healthiest plant from each pot. Plants should be several inches tall before beginning this lesson.

Materials

Four lima bean plants

A plastic bag

Cardboard box or paper sack

Procedure

Say: We have learned that animals have certain needs. Ask: What are the things that animals need to live and grow? (Science Lesson 23--animals need food, water, air and shelter.)

Show the lima bean plants you have grown. Ask: Do you think these plants have certain needs? What might be the needs of a plant? (Allow children to respond. Record the answers on the board.)

Say: We can test to see if plants need these certain things we have listed on the board. We can set up some experiments to see what plants need to live.

Go through each of the responses the children have given as the needs of a plant. Discuss how they can be tested.

Set up the following experiments:

1. Place one plant in the light and water it regularly.

Explain that this plant will receive light, water, and air.

2. Place one plant in the light but do not water it.

Explain that this plant will receive light and air, but no water.

3. Tie a plastic bag around one plant to keep the air out, place it in the light and water it regularly.

Explain that this plant will receive light and water, but no air.

4. Place one plant in the light but cover it with a cardboard box or paper sack to keep out the light. Water the plant regularly.

Explain that this plant will receive water and air, but no light.

Ask children to predict what will happen to each of the plants.

Teacher Note: Point out that all the plants are growing in soil. The soil provides nutrients necessary for plant growth.

Check the plants each day and discuss how the plants change. In a few days children should infer that plants need light, water, and air to grow.

BCP DRAFT SCI 74

Kindergarten - Science - Lesson 36 - Plants

Objectives

Observe that different seeds produce different plants.

Plant seeds.

Explain that plants grow from seeds and change as they grow.

Materials

A variety of seeds, including a peach seed (an acorn and a coconut would be great to add to the collection of seeds)

Hand magnifying lenses

Different fruits (a knife for cutting into pieces)

Individual milk containers (one per student)

Clear plastic wrap

Masking tape

Rubber bands (one per student)

Scissors

Potting soil

Bean seeds for planting

Suggested Titles

Back, Christine. Bean and Plant. Morristown, NJ: Silver Burdett, 1986.

Simple text and color photographs explain how a lima bean grows from seed to harvest. This is a good read-aloud book.

Carle, Eric. The Tiny Seed. Natick, MA: Picture Book Studio, 1987.

A simple description of a flowering plant's life cycle through the seasons.

Gibbons, Gail. From Seed to Plant. New York: Holiday House, 1991.

Colorful illustrations and simple text explain how seeds grow. This is a good introduction to seeds for kindergartners.

Jordan, Helene. How a Seed Grows. New York: HarperCollins, 1992.

This is an excellent read-aloud choice. The experiment included in the book would be worthwhile replicating.

Procedure

Display the variety of seeds, including a peach seed. Ask: Do you know what these things are called? (seeds) Discuss the peach seed, recall the Literature Lesson Momotaro: Peach Boy. Discuss the appearance of the seeds. Provide the children with hand magnifying lenses if available. Guide children to observe, compare, and describe the colors, sizes, shapes, and feel (hard, soft, smooth, rough, etc.) of the seeds. Sort the seeds as a class or in small groups according to size. Suggest the children sort the seeds into two groups: big seeds and little seeds.

Ask: What happens to seeds when you plant them? (Allow children to share any prior knowledge they may have about seeds.) Say: Plants grow from seeds. Show the peach seed again. Ask: If we planted this peach seed, what do you think it would grow into? (a peach tree) Ask: Do you think an apple tree could ever grow from this peach seed? What kind of a seed must an apple tree grow from? (an apple seed) Ask: What about a pumpkin? What kind of a seed does a pumpkin grow from? (a pumpkin seed)

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Kindergarten - Science - Lesson 36 - Plants

Display the fruit. Identify each fruit and cut it open. Ask students to locate the seeds in each fruit. Ask questions about the seeds in terms of size and appearance. Firm up the concept that different seeds produce different plants. Allow children to eat the fruit once the seeds have been examined.

Say: A little seed can turn into a big plant. Even big trees start from little seeds. (Show an acorn if one is available.) Say: The acorn is a seed. It will grow into a giant oak tree. Only an oak tree can grow from an acorn. (Review the saying "great oaks from little acorns grow.") Display the coconut if one is available. Explain that the coconut is a seed that grows into a palm tree. (Show a picture of a palm tree or draw a simple one on the chalkboard.) Explain that when we eat a coconut we are actually eating the seed of a palm tree.

Ask: What do you think seeds need to grow? (Allow children to respond. Guide them toward the concept that the seed needs a specific set of conditions in order to grow.)

Say: Today we are going to plant some seeds and watch how they grow into plants.

Assist the children in planting seeds.

1. Prepare the milk containers for planting by cutting off the tops and cleaning out the insides.

2. Poke several holes in the bottoms of the cartons for drainage.

3. Cut straight down along two corners of the milk carton to create a flap that is hinged at the bottom.

4. Leave the flap down and cover this side with a sheet of clear plastic wrap. Pull the wrap taut and tape it to the outside of the milk carton.

5. Raise the flap and slide a rubber band around the milk carton to hold the flap up in place.

6. Fill the carton about three-fourths full of potting soil.

7. Place the bean seeds in the soil next to the clear plastic wrap. Cover the seeds with about a half-inch more soil.

8. Place the carton on a plate or a tray and water just enough to make the soil moist.

9. Put the carton in a warm place. Check the soil daily and add water as necessary to keep the soil moist.

10. Every day, remove the rubber band and let down the flap to check on the progress of the seed. (Students should be able to observe roots and shoots growing from the seeds after four or five days.)

Read any of the books listed above.

Suggested Follow-Up Activity

Plant three or four other kinds of seeds to firm up that different seeds produce different plants. Buy several different vegetable or flower seed packets. (Pumpkin, marigold, and radish seeds are all quick growing plants.) Note the differences in the seeds. Plant each variety in a different container. Save the seed packet and place it with the container. Compare the differences in the plants as they sprout and grow. You may wish to have the children draw pictures of the seeds and then later draw a picture of the plant.

Make Crunchy Seed Candy.

Mix together the following ingredients:

1 cup sunflower seeds 1 cup cocoa powder

1 cup honey 1 cup peanut butter

Shape into one inch balls. Spread one cup of sesame seeds on a sheet of waxed paper. Roll each piece of candy in sesame seeds. Eat and enjoy! See the Art/Craft Lesson on seeds.

BCP DRAFT SCI 76

Kindergarten - Science - Lesson 37 - Plants

Objectives

Observe and identify the roots, stems and leaves of different plants.

Describe what roots, stems and leaves do for plants.

Identify how plants make food.

Materials

Several live house plants

Pictures of different kinds of plants (obtain from books and magazines)

Newspaper

Drawing paper (one piece per student)

Crayons

Carrots, beets or radishes with their greens (optional)

A long-stemmed white flower (optional)

Red or blue food coloring (optional)

Suggested Title

Royston, Angela. What's Inside? Plants. New York: Dorling Kindersley, 1992.

Simple text, photographs and colorful illustrations explain basic botany. This book is suitable for reading aloud.

Procedure

Check on experiments started in Lessons 35 and 36. Allow time to discuss any changes observed.

Display the house plants. Discuss the differences and similarities in the plants. Carefully pull one of the plants out of the container and place it on a piece of newspaper so the roots are visible. Point to the roots, leaves, and stems of the plant. Say: Plants have parts. Each part of a plant has a certain job.

Point to the roots. Ask: Do you know what the name of this plant part is called? (Allow children to respond.) Say: Roots are plant parts. Roots help to hold plants in place. They also take in water and minerals from the soil. As soon as a seed begins to sprout, its roots begin to grow. Display the carrot, beet or radish with its greens. Tell the children that the vegetable is the root of that particular plant. Compare the roots to the roots of the houseplant. Explain that these vegetables are roots that people eat. (You may wish to clean and cut the vegetables and allow children to taste them.)

Point to the stems. Ask: Do you know what the name of this plant part is called? (Allow children to respond.) Say: Stems are plant parts. Water and food move through the plant stems. Stems also help the plant stay upright. Point to the stems of the other house plants. Point to any trees, bushes, or plants visible from the window of your classroom. Show pictures of different plants collected from books and magazines. Note the differences in the stems. Point out that a tree trunk is a large stem. Say: Some stems are hard and some are soft. Ask: What kind of stem does a tree have? (A tree has a hard stem.) You may wish to demonstrate how water moves up through a stem. Place a long-stemmed white flower into a clear container with some water and a few drops of red or blue food coloring. (For best results, the stem should be freshly cut on a diagonal.) Have students observe the flower every 10-15 minutes and describe any change in the petals of the flower. (Students will notice the petals taking on the color of the food coloring.)

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Kindergarten - Science - Lesson 38 - Plants

Point to the leaves. Ask: Do you know what the name of this plant part is called? (Allow children to respond.) Say: Leaves are plant parts. The leaves of a plant are very important. Plants make food in the leaves. Explain that the food the plant makes is sugar. Say: The plant's leaves take in air and sunlight. The plant soaks up water and minerals through its roots. The plant uses the air, light, water, and minerals to make its own food. Point to the leaves of the other house plants. Note the differences in the shapes and sizes of the leaves. Point to any trees, bushes or plants visible from the windows of your classroom. Show pictures of different plants collected from books or magazines. Note the differences in the leaves. Say: Some plants have flat leaves, some plants have leaves like needles. Some leaves are smooth and some are rough.

Say: We have learned that plants have certain parts. Ask: Who can name the three parts of a plant? (roots, stems, leaves) Firm up the purpose of each part. Distribute the drawing paper. Instruct the children to draw pictures of plants. The drawings should include all three plant parts. Circulate among the children as they are working and ask them to name the parts and functions of the plant they have drawn.

Read the book listed above or one of the titles suggested in Lesson 36.

Suggested Follow-Up Activity

Display pictures of vegetables that students may have eaten. Discuss which part of the plant each vegetable represents. For example, carrots and beets are roots, asparagus and broccoli are stems, lettuce and spinach are leaves.

Root an avocado seed. Wash the seed in bleach, then rinse and dry it thoroughly. Stick toothpicks into the seed at three different spots about one-third of the distance up from the pointed end. Suspend the seed in a cup of water with the toothpicks resting on the edge of the cup. Change the water regularly. Students will observe roots, stems and leaves as the avocado seed sprouts and grows. Plant the seed in potting soil once it has sprouted. You may wish to do the same experiment with a potato (white or sweet) that has several "eyes." White potatoes should be kept in a cool, dark place until they sprout. Sweet potatoes need sunlight.

BCP DRAFT SCI 78

Kindergarten - Science - Lesson 38 - Plants

Objectives

Identify ways in which trees can be used.

Identify deciduous and evergreen trees.

Materials

One of the books listed below to read aloud

Pictures of trees (obtain from books and magazines)

Drawing paper (one piece per student)

Crayons

A large sheet of butcher paper

Magazines

Scissors and glue

Apples (optional)

Suggested Titles

Brenner, Barbara and May Garelick. The Tremendous Tree Book. New York: Four Winds, 1979. Told in simple rhyme, these verses celebrate the marvels of trees. Cut-paper illustrations add to the text.

Dorros, Arthur. A Tree is Growing. New York: Scholastic, 1997.

Simple text and close-up drawings explain the roles of roots, sap, bark, and leaves.

Ehlert, Lois. Red Leaf, Yellow Leaf. San Diego: Harcourt, 1991.

A child describes the growth of a maple tree from seed to sapling.

Lauber, Patricia. Be a Friend to Trees. New York: HarperCollins, 1994.

This book explains ecology issues and describes the benefits of trees. It is suitable for reading aloud.

Locker, Thomas and Candace Christiansen. Sky Tree: Seeing Science through Art. New York: HarperCollins, 1995.

Art and science are blended in this beautiful book about trees.

Pluckrose, Henry. Trees. Chicago: Childrens Press, 1994.

This primary fact book features tree species, nuts and fruits, and animals in a colorful format. It is suitable for reading aloud.

Udry, Janice May. A Tree is Nice. New York: HarperCollins, 1956.

This Caldecott winner gives all the reasons a tree is nice. This is a wonderful book to read aloud.

Procedure

Check on experiments started in Lessons 35 and 36. Allow time to discuss any changes observed.

Say: Today we are going to talk about Earth's largest plants. Can you guess which plant is Earth's largest? (Guide children to conclude the tree is the largest plant on Earth by supplying hints such as: This plant has strong branches, it is home to birds and animals, etc.)

Ask: Can you think of some of the ways we use trees? (for wood, for shade, a place to play, a home for animals, etc.)

Read one of the titles suggested above.

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Kindergarten - Science - Lesson 38 - Plants

Distribute the drawing paper. Instruct the children to draw a picture of one of the ways in

which trees are used. Have them dictate a sentence describing a way the tree is used. Copy their sentences onto their drawings.

Say: In many parts of our country, the leaves on many trees and bushes turn from green to red, gold, and brown. The leaves fall from the trees. Ask: Which season of the year do the leaves fall from the trees? (fall)

Say: Trees and bushes whose leaves change color and fall to the ground have a special name. They are called deciduous (dee-SIJ-oo-us). (Allow children to repeat the word deciduous a few times.) The word deciduous means "falling off." Deciduous trees lose their leaves in the fall, but they grow new leaves every spring! Oak, maple, birch and apple trees are all deciduous trees. Show pictures of deciduous trees.

Ask: Have you noticed that some trees and bushes stay green all winter? Cedar, pine, spruce and fir trees have needle-shaped leaves that stay green all year long. Because they stay green forever, this kind of tree is called an evergreen tree. Show pictures of evergreen trees. Assist children in comparing and contrasting evergreen and deciduous trees.

Fold a large sheet of butcher paper into two parts. Write Deciduous on one half, and Evergreen on the other half. You may wish to add a simple drawing of each type of tree. Provide the children with magazines and scissors. Direct the children to cut out pictures of trees. Assist the children in gluing their cut out trees to the correct half of the butcher paper.

Read another one of the books listed above.

Suggested Follow-Up Activity

Teach children the chant Two Little Apples. (Ask: Is an apple tree a deciduous or evergreen tree?)

Two little apples hanging on a tree,

Two little apples smiling at me,

I shook that tree as hard as I could,

Down came the apples, Mm! . . . were they good!

Directions:

1. Two little apples hanging on a tree, (Extend arms up to shoulder level. Close hands into fists to make apples.)

2. Two little apples smiling at me, (Open fists and turn cupped hands down.)

3. I shook that tree as hard as I could, (Shake body and arms.)

4. Down came the apples, (Squat down on the ground.)

5. Mm! . . . were they good! (Stand up and rub tummy.)

Serve sliced apples as a snack.

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Kindergarten - Science - Lesson 39 - Plants

Objectives

Review the parts of a plant (root, stem, leaf).

Explain how flowers help plants.

Materials

One of the titles suggested below to read aloud

Pictures of flowers (obtain from books and magazines)

Flower seed packets (zinnia, marigold, and sunflower seeds are easy for students to handle.)

Several large sheets of white paper

Suggested Titles

Lobel, Anita. Alison's Zinnia. New York: Greenwillow, 1990.

Alison acquired an amaryllis for Beryl who bought a begonia for Crystal and so on through the alphabet, as full-page illustrations are presented for each flower.

Lobel, Arnold. The Rose in My Garden. New York: Scholastic, 1984.

A description in pictures and verse of the floral and animal inhabitants of a garden, told in the manner of "The House That Jack Built."

Heller, Ruth. The Reason for a Flower. New York: Grosset & Dunlap, 1983.

Beautiful illustrations complement the simple text of this wonderful read-aloud book.

Procedure

Check on experiments started in Lessons 35 and 36. Allow time to discuss any changes observed.

Ask: Who remembers the parts of a plant? (root, stem, leaf) Can you remember the job of each of the parts? (The roots help hold plants in place and take in water and minerals from the soil. The stems help the plant stay upright. Water and food move through the stems. Leaves take in air and sunlight and make food for the plant.)

Say: Today we are going to talk about another part of a plant. These parts are colorful and usually smell pretty. Can you guess which part of the plant we are going to talk about today? (flowers) Ask: Can you name some flowers? (Record the responses on the board.)

Say: Flowers are plant parts. They are different sizes and colors. Some flowers have many petals and others have just a few petals. The flower produces seeds that grow into new plants of the same kind.

Display the flower seeds. Shake out the contents of each packet onto separate large sheets of white paper. Allow the children to examine and touch the seeds of each type and to describe what the seeds look like. Firm up that in some plants the flower produces the seeds that grow into new plants of the same kind.

You may wish to assist the children in planting the flower seeds, perhaps in an outside garden area or in small pots in the classroom.

Read one of the books listed above.











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Kindergarten - Science - Lesson 39 - Plants

Suggested Follow-Up Activity

Play a recording of Tschaikovsky's "Waltz of the Flowers." Encourage the children to move to the music.

Display a copy of one of the paintings of sunflowers by Vincent van Gogh. Explain to the students that the artist loved sunflowers so much that he painted many pictures of them. Point out that the artist used very thick paint to make his sunflowers. Allow the children to paint their own flower pictures.

Tell the children that the largest sunflower blossom on record measured about 32 inches across. Cut out a yellow paper circle with a diameter of 32 inches. Explain that the paper circle is the same size as the largest sunflower blossom. Have students think of other things that have the same shape and are about as big as the sunflower blossom.

Allow the children to participate in a class cooking lesson. Make sunflower sandwich cookie treats.

Ingredients:

A box of vanilla wafer cookies (each child needs 2 cookies)

One container of vanilla frosting

A bag or two of candy corn (each child needs 8 pieces of candy)

A bag of gumdrops (each child needs 1 gumdrop)

A bag of red licorice ropes (optional)

Directions:

Take two vanilla wafer cookies and place them on a table. Spread a little frosting on top of one cookie. Place eight pieces of candy corn on top of the frosting so it forms "petals." Top with the other cookie. Use a little drop of frosting to "glue" one gumdrop on top of the cookie. Poke a three-inch piece of licorice rope into the cookie center for a stem.

BCP DRAFT SCI 82

Kindergarten - Science - Lesson 40 - Plants

Objectives

Identify George Washington Carver.

Materials

One of the titles suggested below to read aloud

A bag of unshelled peanuts (one peanut for each child)

A sweet potato and some pecans (optional)

Suggested Titles

Aliki. A Weed is a Flower: The Life of George Washington Carver. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1988.

This book is appropriate for reading aloud. The life of Carver is explained from his childhood in a slave family to the work he did at Tuskegee.

Greene, Carol. George Washington Carver, Scientist and Teacher. Chicago: Childrens Press, 1992.

This is a good read-aloud for kindergartners. The book is illustrated with many period photos and artifacts.

Procedure

Check on the experiments started in Lesson 35 and 36. Children should infer that plants need light, water, and air to grow.

Say: Today we are going to learn about a famous scientist who was interested in helping farmers learn how to grow new crops. This scientist studied many different plants and crops, but some of his favorites were peanuts, sweet potatoes, and pecans. (Display a sweet potato, some peanuts and pecans if possible. Allow children to tell what they know about these three plants.)

Give each child an unshelled peanut. Direct the children to open the shell and find the nut inside. Explain that the nut is the seed of a peanut. Ask the children to carefully open the nut and find the tiny sprout between the two halves of the nut. Discuss with the children how peanuts grow. Explain that peanuts do not grow on trees like other nuts. Peanuts belong to the same family as peas and beans. When a raw peanut is planted, a sprout forms between the two halves of the nut and grows into a flowering plant. Then when the flowers die, they send shoots down under the ground where the peanut pods form on the ends of the shoots. The peanut grows underground. When we eat a peanut, we are eating a seed. (If possible show a picture of a peanut plant from an encyclopedia.) Allow the children to eat their peanuts.

Read one of the books suggested above about George Washington Carver. If you do not have access to one of the books, the following information should be shared with the children.

We don't know exactly when George Washington Carver was born because his mother was a slave and his birth date was not written down. Ask: Do you remember what it means to be a slave? (History Lesson 13--A slave is someone who belongs to another person called the owner. The owner can sell the slave or make him or her do any work the owner wants. The slave doesn't own anything and has to work for no pay.)

George, his mother, and his brother Jim were owned by a farmer named Moses Carver. When George was a little baby, his mother was kidnaped by slave robbers. His mother was taken to work in a cotton field. George and his brother Jim were saved by Mr. Carver. The boys never saw their mother again. They were raised by Mr. and Mrs. Carver.

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Kindergarten - Science - Lesson 40 - Plants

As a boy George was very interested in plants and flowers. He had his own little garden. He loved to work among the flowers. Once a neighbor came by the Carver farm. She noticed how beautiful the rose bushes were growing. The neighbor asked Mrs. Carver how she cared for the roses. Mrs. Carver told her it was George who knew about the roses. The neighbor asked George to come to her house and look at her rose bushes. George told her to move the bushes out from under the trees. He told her to plant the bushes where the sun could reach them. The neighbor did as George told her and the rose bushes made beautiful flowers. People heard how George had helped the neighbor with her roses. Soon people were asking for George's help in caring for their plants. Seven-year-old George became known as "The Plant Doctor."

George longed to go to school. But schools were only for white children at that time. George had to move to a town several miles away to attend a school for black children. George lived with a black woman and her husband. He called them Aunt Mariah and Uncle Andy. The school was next door to their house. They cared for George as if he was their own son. In school George learned how to read and write, how to add and subtract. As soon as he learned to read well, Aunt Mariah gave George a Bible. George read to her and Uncle Andy every night. George went back to visit the Carver's. He told them all about what he was learning in school. When he returned to Aunt Mariah's house, he brought his brother Jim. Jim started school the next day with his brother.

George did very well in school. He learned all that he could. His hard work carried him all the way through college. After he left college, he was invited to come teach at a college in Alabama called the Tuskegee Institute. The Tuskegee Institute was created especially for African American students. It was just what George wanted: a place where he could study plants and farming, and help educate other black men and women.

George Carver wanted to help farmers in the South. They had been raising cotton for many years, and the crops weren't growing strong and healthy anymore. George said they needed to improve the soil by growing other crops, like peanuts. People laughed at George for this idea. Nobody ate peanuts at that time. George invented ways to use peanuts so people would listen.

George learned how peanuts could be used to make shoe polish, ink, oil, cattle feed, shampoo, soap, and shaving cream. George discovered more than three hundred ways to use the peanut. One evening a group of important people came to dinner at Tuskegee. George planned the meal. They ate peanut soup, peanut bread, peanut loaf, creamed peanuts, peanut cookies and peanut ice cream!

Because of his experiments, farming all over the South changed. More and more farmers were planting peanut crops instead of cotton. Even cotton farmers were raising better cotton plants.

George Washington Carver died when he was seventy-nine years old. He had lived his life to help others, and that is the best a person can do.

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Kindergarten - Science - Lesson 40 - Plants

Suggested Follow-Up Activity

Let the children help shell a package of unsalted, roasted peanuts. Grind the peanuts in a food processor. Gradually add vegetable oil until the mixture is the desired consistency. Add salt to taste. Serve on crackers, apple slices, or celery sticks.

Teach the children the chant Peanut Butter and Jelly.

First the children should practice the movements that go along with the chorus, as follows:

Children hold out both arms to the left and wave them to the music, like Hawaiian dancers. During this movement, chant "Peanut! Peanut Butter," then whisper "and jelly!" as the arms are quickly shifted to the right side.

After children master the "Peanut, Peanut Butter and Jelly" chorus, they are ready to chant the verses as follows:

1. First you have to pick it (picking motions), you pick it, you pick it, pick it, pick it!

2. Then you crack it (breaking motions), you crack it, you crack it, crack it, crack it!

3. Then you mash it (pounding motions), you mash it, you mash it, mash it, mash it!

Sing the chorus twice.

4. Then you stir it (stirring motions), you stir it, you stir it, stir it, stir it!

5. Then you spread it (spreading motion), you spread it, you spread it, spread it, spread it!

6. Then you eat it (eating motions), you eat it, you eat it, eat it, eat, it!

7. Then you chew it (chewing motions), you chew it, you chew it, chew it, chew it!

Sing the chorus again, twice.

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Kindergarten - Science - Plants

Bibliography

*Aliki. A Weed is a Flower: The Life of George Washington Carver. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1988.

*Back, Christine. Bean and Plant. Morristown, NJ: Silver Burdett, 1986.

*Brenner, Barbara and May Garelick. The Tremendous Tree Book. New York: Four Winds, 1979.

*Carle, Eric. The Tiny Seed. Natick, MA: Picture Book Studio, 1987.

*Dorros, Arthur. A Tree is Growing. New York: Scholastic, 1997.

*Ehlert, Lois. Red Leaf, Yellow Leaf. San Diego: Harcourt, 1991.

*Gibbons, Gail. From Seed to Plant. New York: Holiday House, 1991.

*Greene, Carol. George Washington Carver, Scientist, and Teacher. Chicago: Childrens Press, 1992.

*Jordan, Helene. How a Seed Grows. New York: HarperCollins, 1992.

*Lauber, Patricia. Be a Friend to Trees. New York: HarperCollins, 1994.

*Lobel, Anita. Alison's Zinnia. New York: Greenwillow, 1990.

*Lobel, Arnold. The Rose in My Garden. New York: Scholastic, 1984.

*Locker, Thomas and Candace Christiansen. Sky Tree: Seeing Science through Art. New York: HarperCollins, 1995.

*Heller, Ruth. The Reason for a Flower. New York: Grosset & Dunlap, 1983.

*Pluckrose, Henry. Trees. Chicago: Childrens Press, 1994.

*Royston, Angela. What's Inside? Plants. New York: Dorling Kindersley, 1992.

*Udry, Janice May. A Tree is Nice. New York: HarperCollins, 1956.

*indicates annotation in a lesson.