BCP DRAFT GEOG 13



Baltimore Curriculum Project Draft Lessons

Introductory Notes

These lessons generally follow the grade-by-grade topics in the Core Knowledge Sequence, but they have been developed independent of the Core Knowledge Foundation. While the Core Knowledge Foundation encourages the development and sharing of lessons based on the Core Knowledge Sequence, it does not endorse any one set of lesson plans as the best or only way that the knowledge in the Sequence should be taught.

You may feel free to download and distribute these lessons, but please note that they are currently in DRAFT form. At this time the draft lessons on this web site do NOT have accompanying graphics, such as maps or cut-out patterns. Graphics will be added to this site later.

In participating BCP schools, these lessons are used in conjunction with the Direct Instruction skills programs in reading, language, and math. If you use or adapt these lessons, keep in mind that they are meant to address content and the application of skills. You will need to use other materials to ensure that children master skills in reading, language, and math.

Kindergarten - Geography - December - Overview

The Continent Song children have been working on since October will reach its final stage this month. The focus of December geography will be on community and neighborhood. The children will learn their own addresses and that they live in a community called Baltimore, a state called Maryland, a country called The United States, and a continent called North America. These facts will be solidified through the last two verses of The Continent Song. The song should still remain a part of the daily routine. All verses will now be sung to continue to reinforce the names of the continents, the oceans, and now home.

Suggested Titles

Arnold, Caroline. What is a Community? New York: Franklin Watts, 1982.

Bozzo, Maxine Zohn. Toby in the Country, Toby in the City. New York: Greenwillow, 1982.

Brett, Jan. Town Mouse Country Mouse. New York: Putnam, 1994.

Chwast, Seymour. Tall City, Wide Country. New York: Viking, 1983.

Cooper, Melrose. I Got Community. New York: Holt, 1995.

DiSalvo-Ryan, DyAnne. City Green. New York: Morrow, 1994.

DiSalvo-Ryan, DyAnne. Uncle Willie and the Soup Kitchen. New York: Morrow, 1991.

Florian, Douglas. City Street. New York: Greenwillow, 1990.

Gordon, Ginger. My Two Worlds. New York: Clarion, 1993.

Henkes, Kevin. Once Around the Block. New York: Greenwillow, 1987.

Pryor, Bonnie. The House on Maple Street. New York: Morrow, 1992.

Ransom, Candice. The Big Green Pocketbook. New York: HarperCollins, 1993.

The following poetry books are also excellent titles to share with your students throughout this unit.

Greenfield, Eloise. Night on Neighborhood Street. New York: Dial, 1991. This is a beautiful collection of poems exploring the sounds, sights, and emotions enlivening a black neighborhood during the course of one evening.

Grimes, Nikki. Meet Danitra Brown. New York: Lothrop, Lee and Shepard, 1994. This collection of thirteen poems takes the reader to a city where two little girls live. The poems portray life in a city through the illustrations. The poems are about friendship.

BCP DRAFT GEOG 14

Kindergarten - Geography - Lesson 8

Objectives

Understand that a community is a place where people live, work and play.

Understand that a neighborhood is a place where people live near one another.

Understand that communities are made up of neighborhoods.

Participate in a discussion about how a "good neighbor" behaves.

Materials

Select a book to read aloud from the Suggested Titles listed in the December Overview

Drawing paper

Crayons

A city map of Baltimore (optional)

Procedure

Read one of the books listed under Suggested Titles in the December Geography Overview to introduce the meaning of the words community and neighborhood.

Following the reading of the book, say: A community is a place where people live, work, and play. Some communities have many families and other communities may have few families. Ask: Why do you think people live in communities? (People want to be near other people.) Ask: Who can name the community we live in? (Baltimore) Ask: Is Baltimore a community with many families or with few families? (many families) Compare Baltimore with the community you just read about. Point out that communities have houses and other buildings. Ask: Who can name some of the buildings in our community? (There are churches, libraries, museums, schools, banks, and stores in our community.) Ask: Do you think those same kinds of buildings are in other communities, too? (yes) If you have a city map of Baltimore you may wish to display it and discuss the streets and locations identified on the map at this time.

Ask: Does anyone know what a neighborhood is? (A neighborhood is a place where people live near one another.) Explain to students that the places where they live have names. Say: It is very important for you to know the name of the street where you live. That is called your address. Why do you think it is important for you to know your address? (In case of an emergency I could tell people where I live. If I got lost, I could tell a police officer my address.)

If you have not yet done so, begin teaching children their street addresses. A fun way to review and drill the learning of street addresses is to call roll by saying a street address of one of your students and let the student whose address you have called respond with his or her name. After a few days reverse the process by calling the students' names and allowing them to respond with their address. This will be an ongoing process until all children are firm with their street address.

Say: The people who live near one another in neighborhoods are called neighbors. Ask students if they are neighbors with any of the other children in the classroom. Allow them to discuss how they live near one another and therefore are called neighbors.

Ask: What is a "good neighbor"? (Good neighbors are people who live near each other that are helpful and kind.) Ask children to think for a few moments about how neighbors could help each other. Tell the students to raise their hands if they can think of something that shows how to be a good neighbor. Call on one of the children to whisper to you the action they have BCP DRAFT GEOG 15

Kindergarten - Geography - Lesson 8

thought of. If it is an appropriate response, allow that student to pantomime the action for the

rest of the class to see if they can guess the good neighbor behavior. Allow several children to pantomime good neighbor behaviors. (Possible responses might include walking a neighbor's dog, opening a door for a neighbor, saying hello and smiling at the neighbors you know. Treating neighbors nicely and with respect also makes you a good neighbor.) You may wish to remind children that even though they may recognize their neighbors many of them are still strangers and that they need to remember the safety rules when around people that are strangers.

Help children understand that communities are made up of neighborhoods. Talk about

the neighborhood that your school is located in. (Locate the school on the Baltimore city map if you have one.) Ask children to name places in the school neighborhood that are within walking distance. Have them make a second list of places that are not within walking distance of the school. Explain that the list of places that they could walk to are part of the school's neighborhood. Those places that are too far to walk to are not a part of the school's neighborhood, but are a part of the community called Baltimore.

Firm up the lesson by asking the following questions:

* What do people do in a community? (They live, work, and play.)

*What is a neighborhood? (a place where people live near one another)

*How can you be a good neighbor? (I can treat my neighbors nicely and offer to help them if they need it.)

* What is a person who lives near you called? (a neighbor)

*What is the name of our community? (Baltimore)

*What are some special buildings in Baltimore?

Suggested Follow-Up Activity

Provide the children with drawing paper. Tell them to pretend that a friend is coming to visit their community (Baltimore) that has never been here before. They are to draw and color a picture that shows where they will take their friend. Children may wish to write a word or two to accompany their picture.

BCP DRAFT GEOG 16

Kindergarten - Geography - Lesson 9

Objectives

Create a list of people who work to keep a community safe.

Create a list of community helpers.

Create a list of places found in a community.

Procedure

Say: Who remembers what a community is? (A community is a place where people, live, work and play.) Say: What is a neighborhood? (A neighborhood is a place where people live near one another.) Say: Today we are going to talk about the people who work in a community and the kinds of buildings and businesses that are found in a community.

Say: There are many people who work to keep a community safe. Let's name some of those people. (Write the responses on the chalkboard.) Typical answers may include: police officer, firefighters, garbage collectors, doctors, judges. After children have compiled a list, go back to each person listed and discuss how they keep the community safe. For example, the firefighter keeps the community safe by putting out fires in burning buildings.

Say: There are also many people who are community helpers. A community helper is someone who provides a service for the people who live in the community. Let's name some of those people. (Write the responses on the board.) Typical answers may include: teacher, veterinarian, librarian, bus driver, mail carrier. Again, go back to each person on the list and discuss how they help the community.

Tell the children to think about their community. Say: I'm going to ask you some questions about our community. Help me make some more lists on the chalkboard about the things found in our community. Write dwellings on the board. Say: This word says dwellings. A dwelling is a place where a person lives. Let's think of all the different kinds of dwellings found in our community and I'll write them on the board. (apartments, houses, condominiums)

Write transportation on the board. Say: This word says transportation. Transportation is the way people can travel around the community. Let's think of all the different kinds of transportation found in our community and I'll write them on the board. (cars, subway, city bus, school bus, taxi, train)

Write church on the board. Say: This word says church. A church is a place where people worship. Let's think of all the different kinds of places where people worship in our community. (Synagogue, mosque, temple are some possibilities.) Write the responses on the board.

Write businesses on the board. Say: This word says businesses. A business is a place where people can buy the things they need. Let's think of all the different kinds of businesses in our community. (Write the responses on the board.)

Say: Who can name other things that are found in our community that we have not listed on the board yet? (post office, schools, playgrounds, parks, museums)

Discuss with the children that the people and places they have listed on the board are found in all communities.

Suggested Follow-up Activity

Read the list of community helpers and people who keep the community safe. Tell children to draw and color a picture that shows one of these people doing their job. They may wish to write the name of that person under their picture.

BCP DRAFT GEOG 17

Kindergarten - Geography - Lesson 10

Objectives

Review that a globe is a model of the earth.

Identify North America as the continent on which we live.

Identify the United States as a country in North America and our home country.

Identify Maryland as a state in the United States and our home state.

Identify Baltimore as a city in Maryland and our home city.

Materials

A globe

A classroom size world and US map

A map of Maryland

A map of Baltimore (optional)

Procedure

Show children the globe. Ask: Who remembers what this is called? (a globe) Ask: What does the globe represent? (a model of the earth) Ask: Do you remember what the colors on the map mean? (The color blue represents water. The color green represents land.) Show the classroom size map. Ask: Who remembers what this is called? (a map) Say: Today we are going to look at the globe and map again to find out exactly where we live.

Say: What do we call the large bodies of land that are found on the earth? (continents) What do we call the large bodies of water that are found on the earth? (oceans) Let's review the names of the continents and oceans by singing The Continent Song. (Point to the continents and oceans as you sing.)

The Continent Song

North America,

South America,

Europe, Asia, and Africa,

Don't forget Antarctica

Or way down under in Australia.

Pacific Ocean,

Atlantic Ocean,

Indian, Arctic, they're both oceans.

North Pole, South Pole, Equator,

I know all about maps and globes!

Show the map of the world. Point to North America. Say: The continent of North America is where we live. Say: Look carefully at North America. Remember our song. (Point to the Pacific Ocean.) Can you name this ocean? (Encourage children to use the song to help them identify the Pacific Ocean.)

Say: Continue to think about our song. (Point to the Atlantic Ocean.) Can you name this ocean? (Again, tell children to sing the song to themselves so they can name the Atlantic Ocean.)

Say: The Atlantic Ocean and the Pacific Ocean both touch the continent of North America.



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Kindergarten - Geography - Lesson 10

Say: The continent of North America is made up of three countries. (Point to the countries as you name them.) They are called Mexico, The United States of America and Canada. We live in one of those countries. Do you know which one it is? (The United States of America)

Show the US map. Say: We live in the country called The United States of America, and our country is a part of the continent called North America.

Say: Let's look carefully at our country. It is made up of fifty states. (Point to the boundary lines drawn on the map so children can see how the states are divided.)Say: On most maps, the states are shown in different colors so we can see their different shapes. These colors do not mean that the land is that color. It just makes it easier for us to see all fifty states.

Say: Does anyone know the name of the state that we live in? (Point to Maryland on the map.) Say: The name of our state is Maryland. Maryland is a part of the United States and the United States is a country in North America! (Show the state map of Maryland.) We can even be more detailed about where we live by naming our city and our own home address.

Say: Our city has a special name. What is the name of our city? (If you have a state map of Maryland, locate Baltimore.) Say: Baltimore is a city located in Maryland.

Say: We can remember all of this information by adding another verse to our Continent Song. Listen carefully as I sing the next two verses of our song. You will sing it with me once you learn the words. This song will tell us exactly where we live.

Sing the song slowly and carefully. Repeat the song by yourself several times. Allow children to join in as they become familiar with the words.

The Continent Song (Verses three and four)

(Sing to the tune of Love and Marriage)

I live in a city,

I live in a state,

I live in a country,

I live on a continent.

I'm a citizen of the Earth,

My name is _________ and I am special!

My city is Baltimore,

My state is Maryland,

My country is The United States,

My continent is North America.

I'm a citizen of the Earth,

My name is __________ and I am special!

All the verses of The Continent Song have now been introduced. Practice just verse three and four until children are comfortable with the words. Later, go back and sing the song in its entirety. Continue to make the song a part of your daily routine.

Continue to help children learn their home address. Refer to suggestions in Lesson 9.

BCP DRAFT GEOG 19

Kindergarten - Geography - Lesson 11

Objectives

Communicate Baltimore, Maryland, The United States of America, North America, as home.

Communicate his or her own home address.

Make a community booklet.

Materials

Community booklet pages

Procedure

Review with the children where they live on earth. Ask: Who remembers the name of our city? Who can name our state? Does anyone remember the name of our country? Who can name the continent we live on? Firm up the answers by singing verses three and four of The Continent Song.

The Continent Song

I live in a city,

I live in a state,

I live in a country,

I live on a continent.

I'm a citizen of the Earth.

My name is _________and I am special!

My city is Baltimore,

My state is Maryland,

My country is The United States,

My continent is North America.

I'm a citizen of the Earth.

My name is _________ and I am special!

 

Continue to firm up the students' home addresses. Explain that by knowing their home address and the information in the song, children can tell exactly where they live on the Earth.

Conclude the unit by assisting children in the completion of the community booklet. Read the sentences on each section of the booklet to the children. Allow the children to draw and color a picture representing the statement. Cut the booklet pages apart on the dotted lines and staple the completed booklet together.

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Kindergarten - Geography - Lesson 11

Children will draw and color a picture representing each statement. Cut the pages apart on the dotted lines. Staple the completed community booklet together.

My community is called Baltimore.

This is where I live in my community.

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Kindergarten - Geography - Lesson 11

Children will draw and color a picture representing each statement. Cut the pages apart on the dotted lines. Staple the completed community booklet together.

This is a person who keeps my community safe.

This is a neighbor of mine.

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Kindergarten - Geography - Lesson 11

Children will draw and color a picture representing each statement. Cut the pages apart on the dotted lines. Staple the completed community booklet together.

This is a place I go in my community.

This is the very best thing about Baltimore.