BCP DRAFT LIT 50



Baltimore Curriculum Project Draft Lessons

Introductory Notes

These lessons generally follow the grade-by-grade topics in the Core Knowledge Sequence, but they have been developed independent of the Core Knowledge Foundation. While the Core Knowledge Foundation encourages the development and sharing of lessons based on the Core Knowledge Sequence, it does not endorse any one set of lesson plans as the best or only way that the knowledge in the Sequence should be taught.

You may feel free to download and distribute these lessons, but please note that they are currently in DRAFT form. At this time the draft lessons on this web site do NOT have accompanying graphics, such as maps or cut-out patterns. Graphics will be added to this site later.

In participating BCP schools, these lessons are used in conjunction with the Direct Instruction skills programs in reading, language, and math. If you use or adapt these lessons, keep in mind that they are meant to address content and the application of skills. You will need to use other materials to ensure that children master skills in reading, language, and math.

Kindergarten - Literature - December - Overview

The literature selections for December are rich with important lessons and values. Apply the lessons learned through the stories and phrases into the daily routine of your classroom as much as possible. Repeat the phrase Better safe than sorry when applicable. Point out acts of compassion (The Ugly Duckling) being a good friend (Winnie-The-Pooh) and the making of a good decision (Chicken Little) as occasions arise in the classroom.

Note that the poem I Do Not Mind You, Winter Wind is located in the craft section of December. The poem is incorporated into an art activity. The other craft lesson for December can be found with the Jingle Bells lesson in music.

BCP DRAFT LIT 51

Kindergarten - Literature - Chicken Little

Objectives

Attend to the oral reading of the story.

Identify rhyming words in the story.

Discuss the importance of gathering facts before drawing a conclusion.

Illustrate a scene from the story.

Materials

Yellow construction paper

White drawing paper

Construction paper scraps (optional)

Scissors

Stapler

Suggested Titles

Note: Chicken Little is often listed in story books as Henny Penny.

Windham, Sophie. Read Me a Story: A Child's Book of Favorite Tales. NY: Scholastic, 1991.

If you are unable to locate a book with Chicken Little in it, there is an excellent version in What Your Kindergartener Needs to Know, E.D. Hirsch, Jr., and John Holdren.

Procedure

Say: The story that I am going to read to you today is called Chicken Little. Chicken Little will talk to many of her friends and neighbors. She will meet a hen, a goose, a duck, a turkey and a fox. Ask: Where do you think Chicken Little lives if these animals are her neighbors? (Chicken Little lives on a farm. She lives near a pond. Accept any other reasonable answer.)

Say: All of Chicken Little's friends have nicknames. Ask: Do you know what a nickname is? (A nickname is the name your family has for you.) Allow children to share their nicknames.

Say: Chicken Little's friends use rhyming words for their nicknames. Ask: Do you remember how we can tell that words rhyme? (Rhyming words have the same ending sound.)

Say: Before I read you the story let's try to guess what her friends' nicknames are. I'll tell you their first name, then we will guess what their rhyming last name might be.

Write Henny on the board. Say: The hen's nickname is Henny something. Let's think of words that rhyme with Henny. (Write down all answers that rhyme with henny. Encourage children to think of nonsense words, too. Do not tell them the correct name yet.)

Write Goosey on the board. Follow the same procedure as above. Again, encourage children to think of nonsense words that rhyme with Goosey.

Follow the same format as listed above using the names; Ducky, Turkey, and Foxy.

Say: Before we read the story and find out the nicknames of Chicken Little's friends, let's talk about something else. Ask: Have you ever blamed someone for something that you thought they did wrong, and then found out later that person should not have been blamed at all? For example; you may have blamed your little brother or sister for breaking a toy of yours because you found the broken pieces on the floor. You may just have guessed that they broke your toy because they are little and not careful with your things. You may have been very angry with your

BCP DRAFT LIT 52

Kindergarten - Literature - Chicken Little

brother or sister and even told on them. Later, you may find out that you left your toy

on the floor and it was accidentally stepped on by your mom or dad and your little brother or sister had nothing to do with it all. When something like that happens we say that you jumped to the wrong conclusion. That means that you reacted to something without first gathering all the

facts. You blamed your brother or sister without first checking with your parents for more information. If you know all the facts, then you can make a better guess about what really happened.

Say: Chicken Little jumps to a conclusion without gathering the facts first. Listen carefully to this story and hear what happens to Chicken Little and her friends when no one stops to gather the facts. Next read the story.

Following the reading, Say: First let's talk about the rhyming nicknames of Chicken Little's friends. (Allow time for children to recall the names of the characters. Remind children that the names rhyme because they all have the same ending sounds. Check the list made on the board prior to the reading for correct guesses.)

Say: Chicken Little jumped to the wrong conclusion in this story. What did she think was happening? (She thought the sky was falling.) Ask: What really happened? (An acorn fell on her head. Review with the children that an acorn is the seed of an oak tree. This was previously discussed in the November Sayings and Phrases section.)

Ask: How did this story end? (The sly fox ate the animals.) Ask: How did the fox know the sky wasn't really falling? (He is a smart animal and knows that it would be impossible for the sky to actually fall.)

Ask: If your friend came up to you and told you to run because the sky was falling down, would you believe them? Why not?

Ask: How would this story have been different if any of Chicken Little's friends had asked for proof that the sky was really falling? (The animals would have figured out that an acorn fell and not the sky. They would not have been eaten by the fox.)

Ask: What do you think we should learn from this story? (Check all the facts before jumping to the wrong conclusion. We should not take the word of others as the truth, we should use our own brain and figure things out for ourselves.)

Suggested Follow-up Activity

Assist the children in making a Chicken Little book. Children may illustrate a scene from the story, or draw a picture of Chicken Little and her friends.

Directions:

1. Provide the children with a piece of drawing paper

(8 x 11). Allow them time to draw a scene from the story.

2. Provide each student with two pieces of yellow construction

paper (8 x 11)

3. Students trace and cut out the chicken pattern on both pieces

of yellow paper and the drawing paper. (Cutting with pinking

shears will create a zigzag look.)

4. Staple the drawing paper to one of the yellow sheets.

5. Hinge the other yellow paper at the top. Attach the front cover with staples.

6. Children may draw on Chicken Little's face with crayons, or cut eyes and a beak from scrap construction paper.

BCP DRAFT LIT 53

Kindergarten - Literature - Nursery Rhymes

Objectives

Identify the words that rhyme in a nursery rhyme.

Experiment with rhyming words.

Make a booklet.

Procedure

Say: Today we are going to listen for rhyming words in some nursery rhymes. Say: Rhyming words are words that have the same ending sounds, like the words cat and hat. Cat and hat are rhyming words because they have the same ending sounds. Ask: Can you name another word that rhymes with cat and hat? Remember the word must have the same ending sound. (Allow time for children to name other rhyming words. Correct as necessary, reminding children to think of words with the same ending sound.)

Say: Listen carefully to this nursery rhyme. Listen for words that rhyme. Don't call out the rhyming words just yet. We will talk about them after I read the poem. Read:

 

Georgie Porgie

Georgie Porgie, pudding and pie,

Kissed the girls and made them cry;

When the boys came out to play,

Georgie Porgie ran away.

 

Say: Did you hear some rhyming words in that poem? I am going to read the poem again and this time raise your hand when you hear two words that rhyme. (Read the poem again. Stop and acknowledge raised hands. Allow children to name the words that rhyme.)

Say: Georgie and Porgie rhyme, pie and cry rhyme, and play and away rhyme. Say; Let's think about pie and cry. What sound do both of those words have at the end? (They have the "I" sound.) Say: Can you name any other words that rhyme with pie and cry? The word must have the "I" sound at the end of it to rhyme. (sky, my, tie, fly, by, dry, fry)

Say: Let's think about the words play and away. What sound do both of those words have at the end? (They have the "A" sound.) Say: Can you name some other words that rhyme with play and away? Remember to name words that end with the "A" sound. (clay, day, hay, jay, may)

 

Say: I am going to read you another poem. Listen again for words that rhyme. When you hear rhyming words, raise your hand. Read:

Hey, Diddle, Diddle

Hey, diddle, diddle

The cat and the fiddle,

The cow jumped over the moon;

The little dog laughed

To see such sport,

And the dish ran away with the spoon.



BCP DRAFT LIT 54

Kindergarten - Literature - Nursery Rhymes

During the reading of the poem, acknowledge the identification of rhyming words. Say: diddle and fiddle, and moon and spoon are both groups of rhyming words. Challenge the children to name other words that rhyme with moon and spoon (soon, noon, tune, June).

BCP DRAFT LIT 55

Kindergarten - Literature - Nursery Rhymes

Objectives

Listen to comprehend and obtain information.

Develop new vocabulary through listening.

Follow oral directions.

Procedure

Say: A very famous man named Ben Franklin wrote many sayings for people to think about. These sayings often were written to teach us something. Listen carefully to this famous saying and see if you can figure out what Ben Franklin is trying to teach us. Read:

Early to Bed

Early to bed and early to rise,

Makes a man healthy, wealthy,

and wise.

Say: What does the word healthy mean? (to be well, not sick) What does the word wealthy mean? (to be rich) What does wise mean? (to be smart, to know lots of things)

Say: What do you think Ben Franklin's message is to us? (We should go to bed at a sensible time and get our rest so we can stay healthy, but we should not stay in bed all morning. We should get up early and get to work or school so we can learn lots of things and be wise. If we get right to work and learn things, then in the future we should enjoy a good life and be wealthy.)

Read the saying again, encourage children to learn the words and say it with you.

Say: I am going to read you another poem. You will need to be a good listener. You will complete an activity paper after I read the poem to you. (Distribute copies of the following activity paper.)

Say: Listen while I read the poem "Baa, Baa, Black Sheep." Do not write on your paper yet. Just be a good listener.

Read:

 

Baa, Baa, Black Sheep

Baa, baa, black sheep,

Have you any wool?

Yes, sir, yes, sir,

Three bags full;

One for my master,

One for the dame,

And one for the little boy

Who lives down the lane.

Say: Look at your paper and think about the poem I just read. In the poem the sheep has wool for his master, the dame and the little boy. Ask: Who do you think the master is? (He is the person that owns the sheep, the man.) Ask: Who do you think the dame is? (She is the master's wife, the woman.)

BCP DRAFT LIT 56

Kindergarten - Literature - Nursery Rhymes

Say: Listen while I read the poem again. Listen for the color of the sheep and the number of bags of wool each person has. (Reread the poem.)

Ask: What color is the sheep? Color it now on your paper.

Ask: How many bags of wool does this sheep have? Who are the bags for? Draw the correct number of bags of wool next to each person.

Say: You may color the rest of the picture any colors that you choose. As children color, sing the rhyme, encourage children to join in.













































































BCP DRAFT LIT 56a

Kindergarten - Literature - Nursery Rhymes

Name ___________________________________________________________

Baa, Baa, Black Sheep



GRAPHIC!

THIS GRAPHIC WAS SLIGHTLY ADAPTED FROM WORKSHEET MAGAZINE

THE EDUCATION CENTER, KINDERGARTEN, SEPT/OCT 1988































































(Graphic adapted from Worksheet Magazine, The Education Cntr, Kgtn, Sept/Oct 1988)

BCP DRAFT LIT 57

Kindergarten - Literature - Nursery Rhymes

Objectives

Attend to the reading of the nursery rhymes.

Participate in a discussion about telling time.

Participate in an art activity.

Materials

Clock face paper (one per student)

Brad fasteners

Shoe box lids (optional)

Cotton balls (optional)

Procedure

Say: Today we are going to listen to two nursery rhymes. Both of these rhymes have something to do with telling time. Ask: If I wanted to know what time it is, where could I look? (A clock or a watch tell time.) Draw attention to the classroom clock. Point out how it has numbers on it. Identify the hands as the parts that move and point to the time. Read what the current time is.

Say: Listen for the part of this rhyme that has to do with telling time.

Read:

 

A Diller, a Dollar

A diller, a dollar,

A ten o'clock scholar

What makes you come so soon?

You used to come at ten o'clock

But now you come at noon!

Ask: What parts of that rhyme have to do with telling time? (ten o'clock, noon) Ask: Do you know when noon is? (Noon is the middle of the day. It is twelve o'clock. It is lunchtime.)

Ask: What words in the poem rhyme? (You may need to read the poem again.) Say: Scholar and dollar, soon and noon are rhyming words. Ask: How do we know they are rhyming words? (They have the same ending sounds.)

You may wish to explain to your students that scholar means a learned person, or a student.

Say: Listen to this next poem for the part that has to do with telling time.

Read:

 

Hickory, Dickory, Dock

Hickory, dickory, dock,

The mouse ran up the clock.

The clock struck one,

The mouse ran down,

Hickory, dickory, dock.



BCP DRAFT LIT 58

Kindergarten - Literature - Nursery Rhymes

Ask: What part of that rhyme had to do with telling time? (The mouse ran up a clock.) Ask: What do you think happened when The clock struck one? (The clock made a sound to signal that it was one o'clock.) Discuss with children how some clocks chime or ring to signify the hour. These clocks are called grandfather clocks. Allow children to tell about clocks that they know of that chime or ring.

Ask: Why do you think the mouse ran up the clock? (Allow children to speculate. He may have been in search of food. He may have been curious.)

Ask: Why do you think he ran back down the clock when it chimed one o'clock? (He was frightened by the sound. He was afraid someone would see him.)

Suggested Follow-Up Activity

Make a clock with your students:

1. Duplicate the following clock face on heavy paper.

2. Tell children to trace over the numbers

.

3. Children may color the clock.

4. Cut out and attach the hands to the clock with brad fasteners.

5. Assist the children in positioning the hands to read one o'clock.

6. You may extend the activity by attaching the clock face to a shoe box lid to make a grandfather clock.

7. Decorate the shoe box lid to resemble a grandfather clock.

8. Add a cotton ball mouse and reread the nursery rhyme Hickory, Dickory, Dock.

BCP DRAFT LIT 59

Kindergarten - Literature - The Ugly Duckling

Objectives

Develop new vocabulary.

Participate in a discussion about compassion.

Create a swan paper cutting.

Materials

Swan cutting pattern (attached)

White drawing paper

Scissors

Suggested Titles

Andersen, Hans Christian. The Ugly Duckling, retold by Anthea Bell. Saxonville, MA: Picture Book Studio, 1989.

Andersen, Hans Christian. The Ugly Duckling, adapted by Ben Cruise. New York: Golden Book, 1987.

Teacher Information

Many of Hans Christian Andersen's best stories are tales about his own life. He began his life in poverty, the son of a poor shoemaker and a washerwoman. He was born on April 2, 1805 in Odense, Denmark. As a boy, Andersen found joy in his father's readings and the puppet theater that his father had made out of scraps. He loved to act out plays with the theater--plays which later became the inspiration for writing his own fairy tales.

Hans Christian Andersen faced rejection with his attempts at acting, singing, and play-writing. He stood out in the street reciting plays he had learned or poems he had written. In the end though, he achieved great honor and fame for his fairy tales and he hobnobbed with royalty and high society. By the time of his death in 1875, Hans Christian Andersen had written 168 fairy tales--tales that have been translated into hundreds of languages and enjoyed by millions.

It is easy to see how Hans Christian Andersen saw himself as first the ugly duckling who was later transformed into a beautiful swan.

Procedure

Introduce and discuss the word compassion. Say: Compassion means that we care deeply about another person's misfortune or sadness and want to give of ourselves to help the situation.

Say: Let's think of situations where we could show that we cared about someone, situations where we can show compassion. (If children have difficulty thinking of situations, provide the circumstance and ask children to think of ways to show they care in the given situation.) For example, say: What if a friend or relative was sick, how could you show that you cared about them? (You could make them a get-well card.) Say: What if a new student came to our classroom and didn't know anyone or what our day was like? (I could be their friend. I could help them find their way around the school.)

Give children an opportunity to talk about a time when they did something that showed compassion. Say: Can we show compassion toward animals? (yes) How? (We can treat all



BCP DRAFT LIT 60

Kindergarten - Literature - The Ugly Duckling

creatures with kindness. We can take care of our pets. ) Read the following poem:

Kindness to Animals

Little children, never give

Pain to things that feel and live;

Let the gentle robin come

For the crumbs you save at home;

As his meat you throw along

He'll repay you with a song.

Never hurt the timid hare

Peeping from her green grass lair,

Let her come and sport and play

On the lawn at close of day.

The little lark goes soaring high

To the bright windows of the sky,

Singing as if 'twere always spring,

And fluttering on an untired wing -

Oh! Let him sing his song,

Nor do these gentle creatures wrong.

From The Book of Virtues, Edited by William Bennett (Simon and Schuster)

Discuss the poem. Assist children in understanding that a hare is a rabbit and a lark and a robin are birds.

Say: Now I am going to read you a story by a very famous author named Hans Christian Andersen. The name of the story is The Ugly Duckling. In this story, the duckling is in a situation that he cannot help. Listen to see if the other animals show compassion toward the duckling as he struggles with his problem. Read the story.

Next ask: What was the duckling's problem? (Everyone picked on him and made fun of him because they thought he was ugly.)

Ask: Did the other animals show compassion? (no) Ask: What did they do that shows they had no compassion for the duckling? (They were mean to him. They did not try to help him.) Ask: How did that make you feel? (Allow children to respond to emotions the story provoked.)

Ask: How could the other animals have shown compassion? (They could have helped the duckling. They should not have made fun of him that he was different from them.)

Firm up the lesson by reviewing compassion as a positive character trait. Challenge the children to practice this virtue in their daily lives. Perhaps establishing a classroom policy of rewarding acts of kindness witnessed in the classroom will further encourage children to show compassion. A student who demonstrates an act of compassion could be rewarded with a pre-made paper Kindness Crown to wear for the day in class.





BCP DRAFT LIT 61

Kindergarten - Literature - The Ugly Duckling

Suggested Follow-Up Activities

Read other stories that teach about compassion. Bamboo Hats and Rice Cakes, by Ann Tompert (Crown) and The Hummingbird's Gift, by Stefan Czernecki and Timothy Rhodes (Hyperion) are excellent choices. Both stories are filled with examples of kindness, generosity, and compassion.

Hans Christian Andersen was an artist as well as a writer. His art form of choice was that of paper cutting. Paper cutting is often called scherenschnitte (shear-n-SNIT- a) which means "scissor cuts" in German. Never using pencil outlines, Andersen merely folded and cut his designs as he told his tales. Most of the cuttings were given to children to play with; however, about 250 of them have survived and can be viewed at The Hans Christian Andersen Museum in Odense, Denmark. Share his art work found in the book, The Amazing Paper Cuttings of Hans Christian Andersen, by Beth Wagner Brust (Ticknor and Fields).

Demonstrate a swan paper cutting.

1. Cut out the pattern.

2. Fold a sheet of white paper in half.

3. Position the pattern on the fold of the paper and trace.

4.Cut out the swan and glue to a sheet of colored construction paper to create a wall hanging.











































BCP DRAFT LIT 61a

Kindergarten - Literature - The Ugly Duckling

Swan Paper Cutting Pattern

BCP DRAFT LIT 62

Kindergarten - Literature - Winnie-The-Pooh

Objectives

Develop new vocabulary.

Participate in a discussion about friendship.

Dramatize the story using magnetic puppets.

Materials

Paper Winnie-The-Pooh puppets (attached)

Paper clips

Shoe box or other medium size box (to be used as a "stage" for the puppet theater)

A bar or horseshoe magnet

Ruler

Teacher Information

There are several Winnie-The-Pooh stories suitable for the kindergarten age child. This lesson comes from the chapter "In Which Pooh Goes Visiting and Gets into a Tight Place." This excerpt from Winnie-The-Pooh by A. A. Milne can be found in What Your Kindergartener Needs to Know, by E.D. Hirsch, Jr., and John Holdren. You may wish to read another selection to your class; however, it should be noted that The House at Pooh Corner, in which Tigger is introduced, is a Core Knowledge literature selection for first grade, so it is not suggested at the kindergarten level.

Students will dramatize this story using magnetic puppets. This ties in with the science lessons for December which deal with magnetism. Students should have a basic understanding of magnetism prior to this lesson. Therefore, make sure that some of the science lessons have been covered before teaching this literature lesson.

Procedure

Say: The story I am going to read to you today is about several good friends. Friendship is a special feeling that two people have for one another. Ask: Do you have a special friend? (Allow children to tell about special friendships.)

Talk about what friendship means and suggest that everyone has their own definition of friendship. Friends need not be the same age, live near one another, nor be in the same class at school. Sometimes even an animal can be a friend. Ask children to think about traits that make a good friend.

Say: In this story there is a person, a bear, and a rabbit. They are all good friends. But this story is an imagination story because the animals talk and act like people. Ask: Why does that make the story an imagination story? (In real life animals don't talk.)

Show the cover of the book. Children will probably recognize Winnie-The-Pooh. Ask if they can name any of the other characters in the Winnie-The-Pooh stories. Say: In this story there is Winnie-The-Pooh, Rabbit, and Christopher Robin.

Read the story. There are some words that may be new to the students. When you come across one, stop and ask children to help figure out what it means by thinking about the other words in the sentence.

Following the reading of the story ask children to recall places in the story where the

BCP DRAFT LIT 63

Kindergarten - Literature - Winnie-The-Pooh

friendship of the three characters is obvious. They may note where Winnie-The-Pooh stops in for

a visit at Rabbit's house, or when Christopher Robin reads to Winnie-The-Pooh to make the time

waiting to get thin go faster for Pooh.)

Say: We are going to make Winnie-The-Pooh puppets and act out this story. Our puppets will be able to move because of magnetism. Ask: What does magnetism mean? (Magnetism is the force that pulls certain objects toward a magnet.) Allow children to recall previous science lessons in which magnetism experiments were conducted.

Ask: What are some things that we could use to make our puppets magnetic? (Allow children to speculate.) Show the ruler with the magnet tied to it (See directions below) Say: This wand will help us move our puppets.

Say: Our puppets will be made out of paper (Show an example.) Ask: Will paper be attracted to the magnet? Why not? (Paper is not magnetic.)

Ask: What could we do to our paper puppet to make it magnetic? (Allow children to speculate.) Say: Our puppets will have a paper clip attached to them. Ask: Is a paper clip magnetic? Why? (A paper clip is magnetic because it is made of a metal that attracts magnets.)

Directions for making puppets:

1. Children color and cut out the paper puppets of Winnie-The-Pooh, Rabbit, and Christopher Robin.

2. Fold the tab at the bottom of each puppet and put a paper clip on it so the figure stands.

3. Turn a shoe box or other medium size box on its side and draw and color the scenery on the inside. (trees, Rabbit's hole)

4. Tie a horseshoe or bar magnet to a ruler.

5. Set the box on two books or pieces of wood.

6. Wave the ruler with the magnet tied to it under the box with the puppet inside the box.

7. Allow children to dramatize the story or make up new

adventures for Winnie-the-Pooh and his friends.











Graphic





Suggested Follow-Up Activity

There are several videos of Winnie-The-Pooh that are quite good. Share one with the students and compare it to the story you have read. Further explore the value of friendship by reading other books on the theme. The Faithful Friend by Robert San Souci (Simon & Schuster), Adopted by the Eagles by Paul Gobel (Macmillan), Tanya and Emily in a Dance for Two by Patricia Gauch (Philomel), and Seeds by George Shannon (Houghton) are all excellent choices.







BCP DRAFT LIT 63a

Kindergarten - Literature - Winnie-The-Pooh

Paper Puppets

BCP DRAFT LIT 64

Kindergarten - Literature - Sayings and Phrases

Objective

Listen to comprehend and to obtain information.

Procedure

Say: This month we have read several stories that have taught us some important lessons. Ask: What was the lesson we learned in the story The Ugly Duckling? (We should show compassion to all living things.) Ask: What was the lesson from the story Chicken Little? (Gather all the facts before jumping to a conclusion. Make our own decisions about what is right. Following along with the crowd could get you in trouble.)

Say: The phrase we are going to learn today also has an important message for us. Listen carefully and learn this saying well.

Better safe then sorry.

Say: This phrase is very important. Ask: Has anyone heard it before? (If so, allow the student to explain what they think the saying means. If no one has heard the saying before, allow children to speculate about its meaning.)

Say: This phrase means that it is better not to take a chance than to do something that might be dangerous. It means that if you are a careful person and think about the dangers involved in your action, then you are less likely to get hurt or make a bad decision.

Say: Let's think again about the story of Chicken Little. The animals made a bad decision in the story. Do you remember what they all did at the end of the story that cost them their lives? (They followed Foxy Loxy into his den.) Ask: Was it a good decision for the animals to follow the fox? (no) Why not? (A fox eats a chicken, a goose, a hen, a duck, and a turkey for its meal.)

Say: If just one of the animals in that story had stopped to think about the dangers of a fox, they might not have followed him into his den. If the goose had only stopped and said, "We'd better not follow the fox, it's better to be safe than sorry," then all of the animals might have survived.

Say: You would be wise to remember this phrase all your life. You may face a situation when doing the safe and careful thing will save you from harm.

Allow children to relate experiences in which they have already applied the phrase, or speculate about situations when the phrase might be beneficial to recall.

BCP DRAFT LIT 64

Kindergarten - Literature - Sayings and Phrases

Objective

Listen to comprehend and to obtain information.

Procedure

Say: This month we have read several stories that have taught us some important lessons. Ask: What was the lesson we learned in the story The Ugly Duckling? (We should show compassion to all living things.) Ask: What was the lesson from the story Chicken Little? (Gather all the facts before jumping to a conclusion. Make our own decisions about what is right. Following along with the crowd could get you in trouble.)

Say: The phrase we are going to learn today also has an important message for us. Listen carefully and learn this saying well.

Better safe then sorry.

Say: This phrase is very important. Ask: Has anyone heard it before? (If so, allow the student to explain what they think the saying means. If no one has heard the saying before, allow children to speculate about its meaning.)

Say: This phrase means that it is better not to take a chance than to do something that might be dangerous. It means that if you are a careful person and think about the dangers involved in your action, then you are less likely to get hurt or make a bad decision.

Say: Let's think again about the story of Chicken Little. The animals made a bad decision in the story. Do you remember what they all did at the end of the story that cost them their lives? (They followed Foxy Loxy into his den.) Ask: Was it a good decision for the animals to follow the fox? (no) Why not? (A fox eats a chicken, a goose, a hen, a duck, and a turkey for its meal.)

Say: If just one of the animals in that story had stopped to think about the dangers of a fox, they might not have followed him into his den. If the goose had only stopped and said, "We'd better not follow the fox, it's better to be safe than sorry," then all of the animals might have survived.

Say: You would be wise to remember this phrase all your life. You may face a situation when doing the safe and careful thing will save you from harm.

Allow children to relate experiences in which they have already applied the phrase, or speculate about situations when the phrase might be beneficial to recall.