BCP DRAFT SCI 31



Baltimore Curriculum Project Draft Lessons

Introductory Notes

These lessons generally follow the grade-by-grade topics in the Core Knowledge Sequence, but they have been developed independent of the Core Knowledge Foundation. While the Core Knowledge Foundation encourages the development and sharing of lessons based on the Core Knowledge Sequence, it does not endorse any one set of lesson plans as the best or only way that the knowledge in the Sequence should be taught.

You may feel free to download and distribute these lessons, but please note that they are currently in DRAFT form. At this time the draft lessons on this web site do NOT have accompanying graphics, such as maps or cut-out patterns. Graphics will be added to this site later.

In participating BCP schools, these lessons are used in conjunction with the Direct Instruction skills programs in reading, language, and math. If you use or adapt these lessons, keep in mind that they are meant to address content and the application of skills. You will need to use other materials to ensure that children master skills in reading, language, and math.

Kindergarten - Science - Magnetism - Overview

The December science lessons will cover the basic concepts of magnetism. The teacher should note that magnetism will again be explored at the second grade level. At the kindergarten level the children should gather information about magnetism through observation and experimentation of magnets at work. A large collection of a variety of magnets will be necessary to provide students with experimental opportunities.

The following books are useful in showing pictures of magnets at work. It will be necessary to obtain at least one of the books to use in Science Lesson 21.

Suggested Titles

Adler, David. Amazing Magnets. Mahwah, NJ: Troll, 1983.

Catherall, Ed. Magnets. New York: Silver Burdett, 1982.

Challard, Helen. Experiments With Magnets. Chicago: Children's Press, 1986.

Cooper, Jason. Magnets Science Secrets. Vero Beach, FL: The Rourke Corporation, 1992.

Freeman, Mae. The Book of Magnets. New York: Four Winds Press, 1969.

Jennings, Terry. Junior Science Magnets. New York: Gloucester Press, 1990.

Muller, Sonia. Magnets. New York: Putnam, 1970.

Pressling, Robert. My Magnet. Milwaukee: Gareth Stevens Publishing, 1994.

BCP DRAFT SCI 32

Kindergarten - Science Lesson 17 - Magnetism

Objectives

Infer that there are forces we cannot see that act upon objects.

Experiment with magnets to show a push and/or pull force.

Participate in a magnet game.

Materials

Different kinds of magnets (bar, horseshoe, decorative)

Box of objects that magnets will attract

Colored construction paper (8 x 11) one per student

Simple fish patterns (made beforehand by the teacher)

Scissors

Paper clips

Crayons or markers

String

Sticks, dowels, or wooden or plastic rulers (two or three)

Procedure

Call the children together in a circle on the floor. Show the students several different kinds of magnets, from bar and horseshoe magnets to decorative magnets. Ask: Does anyone know what these are called?

Pass the magnets you have collected around the circle allowing the children to hold and examine each magnet. Call on children to share any information they may already know about magnets and how they are used.

Introduce the box of objects that the magnets will attract. Call on volunteers to use the magnets to pick up some of the objects. Encourage students to describe the feeling of attraction as the magnet picks up the object.

Allow time for all the students to have a turn picking up the objects in the box. Draw each student's attention to the feeling of attraction from the magnets. Be sure the different types of magnets are being used.

CAUTION: Instruct children to keep magnets away from any classroom computers or floppy disks you may have in the classroom during this experiment. Give each student a magnet. (If not enough magnets are available, have the children work in pairs.) Tell them to move around the room and try to find things that their magnet will stick to. When they find an object that the magnet sticks to, tell them to hold the magnet close to but not quite on that object so they can feel the pull of the magnet. The teacher should move about the room and help students locate magnetic objects. Work with children individually to discuss the pull of the magnet toward the object.

When all children have had an opportunity to experiment with magnetic force, call the class back to the circle. Allow time for the children to name items in the classroom that their magnets were attracted to. Also have the children name objects that the magnet would not stick to. Say: Magnetism is the force that pulled your magnet toward some objects. We cannot see magnetism, but we can see what magnetism does. For example, we can see how a magnet holds a note or picture on the refrigerator door.

BCP DRAFT SCI 33

Kindergarten - Science Lesson 17 - Magnetism

Send the children back to their seats. Tell them they are going to play a magnet game.

"Let's Go Fishing" Magnet Game

1. Distribute one piece of construction paper to each student.

2. Hand out the fish patterns.

3. Have children trace and cut out a fish shape from their construction paper.

4. A mouth and eyes may be drawn on with markers or crayons.

5. Attach a paper clip near the mouth of each fish.

6. The teacher should make two or three "fishing poles" by tying one end of the string to the dowel (wooden or plastic rulers work fine) and the other to a magnet (preferably a horseshoe magnet).

7. Scatter the fish the children have made on the floor. Have the children take turns with the poles and go fishing!

BCP DRAFT SCI 34

Kindergarten - Science Lesson 18 - Magnetism

Objectives

Predict which group of objects are magnetic.

Classify objects as magnetic or nonmagnetic.

Infer that magnets attract only certain metals.

Record experiment results in a booklet.

Materials

Magnets (bar or horseshoe)

Objects to test for magnetism (paper clips, sheet of paper, a piece of wood, safety pin, plastic toy, eraser, metal spoon, button, feather, key chain, thumbtack, crayon, yarn, aluminum foil or aluminum soda can, staples, a nail, a penny)

Two boxes or trays one labeled Yes the other labeled No

The worksheet to make into Magnet Booklet (one per student)

Teacher Information

Some students may think that all metals are magnetic. In order to be magnetic, a metal must contain iron, nickel or steel. Most materials are not attracted to magnets and therefore cannot be picked up by them. Only a few materials are magnetic. A magnet is a stone or piece of metal that has the property, either natural or induced, of attracting iron, nickel or steel.

Procedure

Call children to a circle on the floor where all can easily see the items you have collected. Say: Who remembers what a magnet can do? (They can pick up or attract certain objects.) Remind children of the work they did with magnets in Science Lesson 17. Allow children to recall items in the classroom that attracted magnets and those items that did not attract the magnets.

Say: Magnets have an unusual power. They attract or pick up certain objects. Magnetism is the force that pulls certain objects toward a magnet. Show the children a paper clip and an eraser. Say: One of these objects will be attracted to the magnet and one of them will not. Who can predict which object will stick to the magnet? (Be sure children understand that predict means to make a guess.) Accept whatever answer the children give. Call on a student volunteer to test the prediction the class has made by holding the magnet near the chosen object. Test the other object to show that only one of the items will attract the magnet. Say: Not all objects are magnetic. Today we are going to do an experiment to find out which items are magnetic and which are not.

Show and identify each of the items you have collected for the experiment. Tell children to be thinking about whether they think the item will stick to the magnet or not. Say: When you are thinking about whether the items will stick to the magnet or not you are making a prediction. A prediction is a guess that will be tested later.

Put the Yes and No boxes in easy view. Go through each item you have collected and call on a student to predict whether the item will attract the magnet or not. Instruct the student to put the item in the Yes or No box depending upon his/her prediction. (Caution children to be careful with the sharp objects.) When all items have been placed in one of the boxes say: Now we are BCP DRAFT SCI 35

Kindergarten - Science Lesson 18 - Magnetism

ready to test our predictions. Who knows how we can test to see if our predictions are correct?

(We can use a magnet and try each item to see if it will stick to the magnet or not.)

Call on different children to test all the items in both the Yes and No box. If items do not test correctly, move them to the correct box so when the experiment is completed the items will be correctly separated.

Conclude the experiment by saying: Do magnets attract paper, wood, or plastic? (or name items in the No box) Do magnets attract safety pins, thumbtacks, and paper clips? (or name items in the Yes box) Ask: What are all the items in the Yes box made of? (They're made of metal.) Say: But not everything made of metal is attracted by magnets. Test the aluminum foil or aluminum soda can and the penny again. Say: The soda can is made of a metal called alumium and the penny is made of a metal called copper. Magnets attract some metals, but not aluminum and not copper. The most common metal that magnets do attract is called iron.

Send the children back to their seats to make the magnet booklet. Distribute one copy of the paper to each student.

Directions for Magnet Booklet

1. Fold the paper in half so the handwriting sections are on the inside.

2. Cut up the top flap to the fold line creating two tabs.

3. Fold the booklet in half again like a greeting card.

4. On the outside of the booklet tell the children to draw a large magnet (horseshoe or bar).

5. Open the booklet and write the word Yes on one tab and No on the other tab.

6. Lift the Yes tab and write the names of one or two items from the Yes box that attracted the magnet. (Children may draw the items rather than write the word.)

7. Lift the No tab and write the names of one or two items from the No box that did not attract the magnet. (Children may draw the items rather than write the word.)

8. Tell children to take their booklets home and share the results of the experiment with a family member.

 

Illustration of how to make booklet goes here!

























BCP DRAFT SCI 36

Kindergarten - Science Lesson 18 - Magnetism

Suggested Follow-Up Activity

Provide students with magnets and instruct them to find five things that are magnetic and five things that are not magnetic at home. Allow time for students to discuss their findings the next day. You may wish to place the magnets in Ziplock bags for ease in traveling. Caution children to keep the magnets away from home computers.









































































BCP DRAFT SCI 36a

Kindergarten - Science Lesson 18 - Magnetism







BCP DRAFT SCI 37

Kindergarten - Science Lesson 19 - Magnetism

Objectives

Experiment to see if magnets can attract through different materials.

Classify objects that magnets can attract through.

Materials

A magnet (bar or horseshoe)

A paper clip

Paper (plain white or notebook type)

Waxed paper

A piece of wood (a wooden block works fine)

A chalkboard eraser

A book

Cloth

Aluminum foil

Items classified as attracting a magnet in Lesson 18 (Yes box)

Teacher Information

Magnets, if strong enough, can attract through other nonmagnetic materials, such as paper, cloth, wood, and glass. The magnet does not pull any of these materials toward itself, but the magnetic force is not stopped by these materials.

The children will continue to experiment with this concept in a future literature lesson.

Procedure

Call the children to the circle area again and review information already covered concerning magnets. Ask: Who can name an object that a magnet will attract? (Children should name items tested during Science Lesson 18.) Ask: Who can name an object that a magnet will not attract? (Again, allow children to list items from the previous experiment.) Ask: Do magnets attract all metals? (no) Ask: Who can name a metal that a magnet will not attract? (Children may answer a penny or a soda can.) If you assigned the suggested follow-up activity from Lesson 18 allow time now for children to discuss the results of the at home experiment.

Say: Today we are going to see if magnets can attract items from our Yes box through different materials. Display the materials you have collected for the experiment. Wrap the magnet in the paper. Place the paper clip on the floor or on a table where all children can see it. Say: We are going to make predictions again today. Who remembers what a prediction is? (a guess) Say: Let's predict if we think the magnet can pick up the paper clip when the magnet is wrapped in a piece of paper. Allow children to make predictions by saying: Raise your hand if you predict the magnet will pick up the paper clip. (Allow time for a show of hands.) Say: All right, hands down. Now those of you who predict the magnet will not be able to pick up the paper clip raise your hands. (Remind children that they are only making a guess and that it is all right if their guess is wrong. This is not a contest to see who is right.)

Say: How can we test the predictions you have made? (We can touch the paper-wrapped magnet to the paper clip and see if it sticks.) Test and discuss the results. (You may wish to allow a student volunteer to conduct the test.)

BCP DRAFT SCI 38

Kindergarten - Science Lesson 19 - Magnetism

Continue the experiment by wrapping the magnet in each of the materials you have

collected. Prior to testing, be sure to allow children to make predictions. Allow different children to test each material. Discuss results following each test.

Conclude the lesson by making a chart similar to the one that follows on the chalkboard. Ask children to help you record the results of the experiment by reading the words and allowing a student to come to the board to place a check mark in the Yes or No column.

Through Which Materials Will a Magnet Attract?

MATERIAL YES NO
Paper
Wooden Block
Waxed Paper
Book
Aluminum Foil
Waxed Paper
Eraser


Suggested Follow-Up Activity

Place several paper clips in the bottom of a wide-mouthed container. Cover the paper clips with about a half inch of sugar. Ask students to predict if the magnet will lift the paper clips off the bottom of the container. Then have a volunteer drag the magnet over the top of the sugar to test the prediction. (The force of magnetism will go through the sugar.)

Clean the sugar out of the container and replace it with about an inch of water. Drop several paper clips into the water and let them settle on the bottom. Ask students to predict if the magnet will lift the paper clips off the bottom of the container. Then have a volunteer drag the magnet over the top of the water to test the prediction. (The force of magnetism will go through water.)

BCP DRAFT SCI 39

Kindergarten - Science Lesson 20 - Magnetism

Objectives

Observe that magnets can be a variety of sizes, shapes and strengths.

Measure the strength of magnets using paper clips.

Materials

A variety of magnets (bar, horseshoe, decorative)

Paper clips

Drawing paper

Crayons

Procedure

Show children the collection of magnets you have assembled and discuss their shapes and sizes. Ask: Can you tell from looking at this group of magnets which one will be the strongest? (Children may guess that the biggest magnet will be the strongest.) Say: We can experiment with these magnets to find out which one is the strongest. We are going to record our findings on paper so we will know for sure which one of these magnets is the strongest.

Distribute a piece of drawing paper to each student. Choose one of the magnets you have collected and show it to the children. Tell them to draw a picture of it on their paper. Allow time for all students to complete the drawing.

Next, put a pile of paper clips on a table where children can see. Place the magnet into the paper clip pile and create a paper clip chain. See how many paper clips will stick to the magnet. Tell children you are testing the strength of the magnet by seeing how many paper clips will stick to it. Ask the children to help you count the number of paper clips the magnet was able to pick up. Children should write the number next to the picture of the magnet on their drawing paper.

Show the children another magnet from the collection. Allow time for them to draw a picture of it on the paper. Ask: How can we test the strength of this magnet? (We can see how many paper clips it will pick up.) Call on a volunteer to test the strength of the magnet. Have children count with you the number of paper clips collected on this magnet. Children should record the number next to the magnet's picture.

Continue testing the magnets you have collected by allowing different volunteers to run the magnet into the paper clip pile. Children continue to draw the magnet and record the results on the drawing paper.

Conclude the lesson by determining which magnet was the strongest and which magnet was the weakest. Ask: How can we tell which magnet was the strongest? (The magnet that picked up the greatest number of paper clips is the strongest.)

Ask: Can you tell from looking at a group of magnets which one will be the strongest? (No, the biggest magnet may not be the strongest.) Children should be able to conclude that magnets vary in strengths and that the size or shape of the magnet has nothing to do with its strength.









BCP DRAFT SCI 40

Kindergarten -Science Lesson 20 - Magnetism

Suggested Follow-Up Activity

Can a magnet make a paper clip "fly"?

Materials

A paper clip

Thread

Tape

Magnet

 

1. Tie a piece of thread to the end of the paper clip.

2. Tape the other end of the thread to a table or desk top.

3. Allow the paper clip to hang over the edge of the table.

4. Hold the magnet about a inch below the paper clip without touching it.

5. Move the magnet slowly from side to side.

6. Move the magnet slowly in a circle.

7. Move the magnet so that the paper clip moves above the desk or table.

Conclude that magnetism travels through air.

BCP DRAFT SCI 41

Kindergarten - Science Lesson 21 - Magnetism

Objectives

Identify familiar everyday uses of magnets.

Materials

Classroom items that use magnets (Identify in advance and place prominently in the room.)

Magnetic tape (This can be purchased by the roll at most craft and hardware stores.)

Felt scraps (Construction paper may be substituted if felt scraps are not available.)

Drawing paper

Crayons

Suggested Titles

Adler, David. Amazing Magnets. Mahwah, NJ: Troll, 1983.

Catherall, Ed. Magnets. New York: Silver Burdett, 1982.

Challand, Helen. Experiments With Magnets. Chicago: Children's Press, 1986.

Cooper, Jason. Magnets Science Secrets. Vero Beach, FL: The Rourke Corporation, 1992.

Freeman, Mae. The Book of Magnets. New York: Four Winds Press, 1969.

Jennings, Terry. Junior Science Magnets. New York: Gloucester Press, 1990.

Muller, Sonia. Magnets. New York: Putnam, 1970.

Pressling, Robert. My Magnet. Milwaukee: Gareth Stevens Publishing, 1994.

Procedure

Say: We have seen how magnets work to attract or pick up other objects. We can use magnets to help us do work. Look around our classroom and see if you can find any magnets that are helping us in this room. (Most classrooms have magnetic cabinet door latches, magnetic letters on a chalkboard or door, magnetic paperclip holder, magnetic toys, and magnets holding papers on a chalkboard. Be sure any magnets at work in your classroom are highly visible.)

Obtain a copy of one of the books listed under Suggested Titles. Read the book you have selected to the children. Draw attention to the many uses of magnets and how they help us do work.

Conclude the lessons on magnetism by orally assessing the information you have presented. Following are questions suggested to engage children in the discussion. Be sure to call upon a variety of children to answer; allow time for multiple answers.

*What kinds of things do magnets attract? (Children should show understanding that magnets only attract certain metals. Accept responses that list items they have previously tested for magnetism.)

*What are some ways people use magnets? (Children should recall information learned through the reading of one of the books listed above.)

*What shapes can magnets be? (round, horseshoe, rectangle)

*What sizes can magnets be? (They can be almost any size. )

*Will magnets attract through materials? (They will attract through materials, but how well they work depends upon the strength of the magnet and the kind of covering. Have students explain their answer by recalling the experiment in which different coverings were used to wrap the magnet.)

BCP DRAFT SCI 42

Kindergarten - Science Lesson 21 - Magnetism

*How can you tell how strong a magnet is? (You can tell the strength of a magnet by how many objects it will pick up. Recall the experiment in which magnet strength was tested.)

Suggested Follow Up Activity

Provide the children with drawing paper and crayons. Ask the students to illustrate how magnets are used in the world and how they make life easier.

Suggested Culminating Activity for the Magnetism Unit

Have students create decorative magnets using scrapes of felt and magnetic tape.

1. Provide the children with simple designs to trace on the felt scraps. (Flower shapes are very easy.) If felt is not available construction paper can be substituted. Make the design small enough to retain its shape when attached to the tape.

2. Children will cut out the shape they have traced and attach it to a small strip of magnetic tape.

3. Display students' work, using their own personal magnets, on filing cabinets or magnetic chalkboards. The magnets could also be sent home to put on the refrigerator where work could be displayed at home.

You may wish to share the following fun facts about magnets with your students.

*The heaviest magnet in the world is in the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research near Moscow. This enormous magnet weighs more than 42,000 tons!

*Some scientists believe birds use the Earth's magnetic field to help them navigate, or find their way, while migrating.

*Veterinarians sometimes use magnets to pick up pieces of wire or other metal from inside a cow's stomach.

*The Earth itself is a big magnet, with north and south poles at opposite ends.

* Doctors sometimes use magnets to remove tiny pieces of steel from workers' eyes.