BCP DRAFT HIST/GEO 33

Kindergarten - History/Geography - February Overview

February lessons introduce children to some special Americans who have had an important role in shaping our country's history. Children will make coin rubbings of a penny, nickel and a quarter. This will allow for a natural tie-in to the math concept of recognizing and counting coins.

BCP DRAFT HIST/GEO 34

Kindergarten - History/Geography - Lesson 14

Objectives

Review that North America is the continent on which we live.

Review that the United States is a country located in North America.

Understand that people who live in the United States are called Americans.

Materials

A classroom size U.S. and world map

Copies of the map of North America (attached)

Crayons

Magazines with pictures of Americans working

Suggested Titles

Anno, Mitsumasa. Anno's U.S.A. New York: Philomel, 1983.

This is a delightful wordless picture book with detailed, full-page illustrations of the United States of today and yesterday.

Lye, Keith. Take a Trip to Canada. New York: Franklin Watts, 1984.

Some of the main features of Canada are shown and described, using simple text and colorful photographs. This book is appropriate to read aloud.

Lye, Keith. Take a Trip to Mexico. New York: Franklin Watts, 1982.

Mexico's geography, sights, and prominent places are described using simple text and colorful photographs. This is a nice book to share with youngsters.

Provensen, Martin, and Alice Provensen. Town and Country. New York: Crown Publishers, 1984.

Life in a big city and life on a farm are each described and beautifully illustrated. This is a nice read-aloud book.

Robbins, Ken. City/Country: A Car Trip in Photographs. New York: Viking, 1985.

This is a marvelous book to share with youngsters. Full-page color photographs take the reader on a car trip from the city to the suburbs, passing farms, small towns, mountains, and an ocean.

Procedure

(Point to North America on the world map.) Say: This is the continent where we live. Ask: Do you know the name of this continent? It is the first one we say when we sing our Continent Song. (Allow children to sing the Continent Song quietly to identify North America.)

The Continent Song

North America,

South America,

Europe, Asia, and Africa,

Don't forget Antarctica

Or way down under in Australia.



BCP DRAFT HIST/GEOG 35

Kindergarten - History/Geography - Lesson 14

Say: This is the continent of North America. Ask: What are the names of the oceans that touch North America? We can find out by singing the next verse of the Continent Song. (Sing through the second verse, and accentuate Pacific Ocean and Atlantic Ocean.)

PACIFIC Ocean,

ATLANTIC Ocean,

Indian, Arctic, they're both Oceans.

North Pole, South Pole, Equator,

I know all about maps and globes!

Explain that North America is divided into different lands called countries. Point out on the map how the countries are represented with different colors. Point to the United States.

Say: This is the United States of America; it is a country that is part of North America. It is where we live. Sometimes we call our country the United States of America, sometimes we just say United States, or just America, or even just the letters U.S.A.

Point out Canada and Mexico.

Say: The countries of Canada and Mexico are neighbors of the United States. They are also a part of the continent of North America. People who live in Canada are called Canadians. People who live in Mexico are called Mexicans.

Outline the individual states on the U.S. map with your finger.

Say: These are called states, they are parts of our country. See how each state has a different size and shape? There are 50 states that make up the United States.

Ask: Do you remember the name of the state that we live in?

Say: Each state is a part of the United States. Each state has a different name. Americans live in each state. The word American comes from the word America. (Point to a state and say its name, say: This state is called _____, Americans live in _______, repeat naming three or four different states including Maryland.)

Read one of the books listed under Suggested Titles.

Suggested Follow-Up Activities

1. Children will complete the map of North America.

Directions

A. Distribute the attached map of North America.

B. Children will color the United States red. Assist children in locating Alaska and Hawaii. Show them the locations of these two states on the map.

C. Children will color Canada and Mexico green. Tell children the names of these two countries that are also part of North America and neighbors of the United States.

D. Children will color the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans blue.

2. On mural paper, draw a large outline of the United States. Pin the outline on the

chalkboard or bulletin board. Distribute magazines to the children and direct them to cut out pictures of Americans engaged in all kinds of activities. Glue the cut-out pictures inside the outline of the United States. Use the pictures to discuss Americans and the kinds of things they do.

BCP DRAFT HIST/GEOG 36

Kindergarten - History/Geography - Lesson 14

3. Sing patriotic songs such as "America, the Beautiful," "This Land is Your Land" and others. Wee Sing America: Songs of Patriots and Pioneers (Price, Stern, Sloan, 1987) contains standard patriotic songs and is a good choice.

BCP DRAFT HIST/GEOG 37

Kindergarten - History/Geography - Lesson 15

Objectives

Define president as the leader of our country.

Recognize that George Washington is known as the Father of Our Country.

Identify George Washington as our country's first president.

Discuss the legend of the cherry tree.

Materials

One of the books listed below about George Washington

Washington profile paper (one per student) attached

Several quarters

Colored pencils or crayons

Suggested Titles

Adler, David. A Picture Book of George Washington. New York: Holiday House, 1989.

This biography depicts the life of George Washington from his childhood to his presidency. It is appropriate for reading aloud.

Adler, David. George Washington: Father of Our Country. New York: Holiday House, 1988.

This is an excellent biography of the first President of the United States. It is an appropriate read-aloud.

D'Aulaire, Ingri and Edgar. George Washington. Garden City: Doubleday, 1936.

This pictorial biography includes full-page illustrations that highlight the life of George

Washington. It is a nice read-aloud book.

Fisher, Aileen. My First Presidents' Day Book. Chicago: Childrens Press, 1987.

This slender book of poems is a pleasant way to introduce George Washington and Abraham Lincoln.

Greene, Carol. George Washington: First President of the United States. Chicago: Childrens Press, 1991.

This Rookie Biography highlights the life of George Washington from his childhood, his work as a surveyor and a soldier. It is appropriate for reading aloud.

Quakenbush, Robert. I Did It With My Hatchet: A Story of George Washington. New York: Pippin, 1989.

This is a humorous rendition of George Washington's life. It is appropriate for reading aloud.

Teacher Information

George Washington became president in 1789. Washington was known for initiating many "firsts" in our country: the first meeting of the Supreme Court, the first census, the first ten amendments to the Constitution, and the first Cabinet.

 

Procedure

Ask: Who remembers the name of our country? Do you remember the name of the continent where the United States is located?

Say: We are going to be learning about people who are special Americans.

BCP DRAFT HIST/GEOG 38

Kindergarten - History/Geography - Lesson 15

Tell the children about someone who is special to you. Describe for the children why this person is special.

Invite volunteers to tell about someone who is special in their lives. Encourage children to think of people other than their parents. List on the chalkboard the reasons that these people are special. (Possible answers might be: They help me; they are my friend; etc.)

Explain that just as the children have people who are special to them, our country has people who are special to it. We call these people special Americans.

Say: One of our country's most famous special Americans is George Washington. George Washington was our country's first president.

Ask: Do you know what a president is? (Explain that the president is the leader or head of our country.)

Say: In the United States we don't have a king or a queen, but we do have leaders. We choose the people we want to lead us. In the United States we call our most important leader the president.

Say: Our first president was George Washington. He is known as "the father of our country." Americans trusted and loved George Washington because he worked hard to help our country.

Read one of the books listed above about Washington.

Say: There is a famous story about George Washington. It's a legend, which means that it probably didn't really happen. Americans like to tell it because it is about ideas we believe in. It is the legend of George Washington and the Cherry Tree and it tells us about Washington's honesty.

Ask: What does it mean to be honest? (Allow children to respond.)

Say: Honesty is truthfulness. It means not telling lies. People trust you when they see that you are an honest, truthful person.

Following is the legend of the cherry tree taken from What Your Kindergartner Needs to Know by E.D. Hirsch and John Holdren:

George Washington and the Cherry Tree

When George was a small boy, his father gave him a fine new hatchet. George was delighted. He tried his new hatchet on logs from the woodpile: chop, chop, chop!

Then a thought came to him: wouldn't it be exciting to cut down a real tree?

So he went into the nearby orchard. He saw a fine young tree and set to work: chop, chop, chop! The tree fell - bang! - to the ground. George was pleased: how well his hatchet chopped! But then he looked at the tree. It was a special cherry tree that had been sent to his father from England. George began to feel uneasy.

Soon his father came home. When he went into the orchard, he saw the cherry tree lying on the ground. He was angry: he had hoped soon to pick some large, juicy cherries from this tree, but now look at it! He asked one person after another who had done this deed. No one knew. Finally he came to young George.

By this time George knew that he had done something wrong and thoughtless. He felt ashamed, and also scared, for his father was very angry.

"George," said his father sternly, "do you know who cut down my cherry tree?"

What should George do? He looked up and saw his father's angry eyes. But George did not turn away. He said, "Father, I cannot tell a lie. I cut down the tree. I did it without thinking, and I am sorry."

"I am sorry, too, my boy," said George's father. "But I would rather lose all my trees than have you tell a lie or be afraid of telling the truth."

Discuss the story with the children. Point out that it may have been easier for George to lie rather than face the anger of his father. Give children an opportunity to talk about honesty in their own lives.

Discuss how Washington's honesty, love for America, and his leadership as the first president of the United States are the reasons that Washington is considered a special American.

 

Read the following poem to the children:

Washington

He played by the river when he was young,

He raced with rabbits along the hills,

He fished for minnows, and climbed and swung,

And hooted back at the whippoorwills.

Strong and slender and tall he grew -

And then, one morning, the bugles blew.

Over the hills the summons came,

Over the river's shining rim.

He said that the bugles called his name,

He knew that his country needed him,

And he answered, "Coming!" and marched away

For many a night and many a day.

Perhaps when the marches were hot and long

He'd think of the river flowing by

Or, camping under the winter sky,

Would hear the whippoorwill's far-off song.

Boy or soldier, in peace or strife,

He loved America all his life!

Nancy Byrd Turner

Suggested Follow-Up Activity

Tell children that throughout this unit they will be making pages for their own books about special Americans.

1. Duplicate the profile of Washington for each child (attached).

2. Show the quarters you have collected. Discuss the name and value of the coin. Show children the picture of Washington on the front. Explain how special Americans are often honored by having their pictures on American money. (You may also wish to show Washington on the one dollar bill.)

3. Allow children to make a coin rubbing of the quarter somewhere on their Washington profile paper. Children should place the coin under the paper and gently color over the coin with a colored or lead pencil.

4. Instruct children to draw a picture of a cherry tree and hatchet on the Washington profile paper.

5. Save the completed paper until the conclusion of this unit when all the special American papers will be made into a booklet.

BCP DRAFT HIST/GEOG 40a

Kindergarten - History/Geography - Lesson 15

Name ________________________________________

GEORGE WASHINGTON





























































BCP DRAFT HIST/GEO 36a

Kindergarten - History/Geography - Lesson 14

Name___________________________________

North America

Color the United States red. Color the Pacific and Atlantic Ocean blue. Color Canada and Mexico green.

Graphic

BCP DRAFT HIST/GEO 41

Kindergarten - History/Geography - Lesson 16

Objectives

Review president as the leader of our country.

Understand how a person becomes the president.

Identify Thomas Jefferson as the third president of the United States.

Recognize the contributions Thomas Jefferson made to the United States that classify him as a special American.

Materials

A book about Thomas Jefferson

Jefferson profile paper (one per student) attached

Several nickels

Colored pencils or crayons

Suggested Titles

Adler, David. A Picture Book of Thomas Jefferson. New York: Holiday House, 1990.

The life and achievements of Thomas Jefferson are traced in this colorfully illustrated book. It is suitable for reading aloud.

Brown, Marc. Arthur Meets the President. Boston: Little Brown, 1991.

This book is fun to read aloud. Arthur wins a trip to meet the president.


Procedure

Ask: What were some of the things that made George Washington a special American? (Allow children to recall information about Washington from Lesson 14. Children should recall that Washington was our first president.)

Say: Today we are going to learn about another special American. This special American was also a president. He was our third president.

Ask: Do you remember what a president is? (the leader of our country)

Say: The president is the leader of our country. The president meets with other leaders of the United States. Sometimes our president travels to other countries to meet with their leaders. The president listens to many people who want help or advice. Our president is the leader of the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marines.

Say: The law says that to become president of the United States a person must be born a citizen of the United States, have lived in the United States at least 14 years, and be at least 35 years old.

If you have access to Arthur Meets the President by Marc Brown (Little Brown, 1991) read it at this time.

Say: The special American we are going to learn about today is Thomas Jefferson. Thomas Jefferson lived at the same time George Washington did. The two men were friends and worked together to help our country. Thomas Jefferson was our third president.

Jefferson was a book lover. He read as many books as he could get his hands on. He learned many things from reading books. He even taught himself how to play the violin by reading a book. Jefferson said, "I cannot live without books!"

BCP DRAFT HIST/GEO 42

Kindergarten - History/Geography - Lesson 16

Thomas Jefferson was a good writer, too. He wrote a very important paper. It is called the Declaration of Independence. In that paper Thomas Jefferson wrote that "All men are created equal." That idea was new to many people. No one had ever started a country with that idea before.

Jefferson designed many buildings that are still standing today. His home, Monticello, is perhaps the most famous. He owned thousands of acres of land and was a very good gardener. Jefferson believed that horseback riding was good exercise. He rode his horse every day.

Ask: Have you ever made a building with blocks? Did you have fun creating buildings?

Ask: What are some of the ways you get exercise?

Ask: Have you ever helped plant a garden?

Say: Jefferson was very interested in the weather. He wrote down the wind direction and the temperature every day. He was also interested in music. He loved to play his violin.

Ask: Do you like music, too?

Point out that the children may have interests similar to Jefferson's.

Thomas Jefferson was a great leader of our country. He also was a very loving husband, father, and grandfather. Jefferson was very interested in education and learning everything he could. He helped in teaching his twelve grandchildren. He gave each one a scrapbook and sent them clippings from the newspaper as well as poems and stories that he thought they might be interested in. He told them to save the things he sent them in their scrapbooks.

Ask: Do you think Thomas Jefferson was a special American? Why?

Suggested Follow-Up Activity

Continue the Special Americans Booklet.

1. Duplicate the profile of Jefferson for each child (attached).

2. Show the nickels you have collected. Discuss the name and value of the coin. Show children the picture of Jefferson on the front and the picture of Monticello on the back. (You may also wish to show Jefferson on the two-dollar bill.)

3. Allow children to make a coin rubbing of the nickel somewhere on their Jefferson profile paper. Children should place the coin under the paper and gently color over the coin with a colored or lead pencil.

4. Instruct children to draw a picture of something they have learned about Jefferson. Pictures of books, horseback riding, gardens, or a violin would be appropriate.

5. Save the completed paper until the conclusion of this unit when all the Special American papers will be made into a booklet.







BCP DRAFT HIST/GEO 42a

Kindergarten - History/Geography - Lesson 16

Name ______________________________________________

Thomas Jefferson

BCP DRAFT HIST/GEO 43

Kindergarten - History/Geography - Lesson 17

Objectives

Identify Abraham Lincoln as a special American.

Recognize the contributions Abraham Lincoln made to the United States.

Materials

One of the books about Abraham Lincoln

Lincoln profile paper (one per student) attached

Several pennies

Colored pencils or crayons

Suggested Titles

Brenner, Martha. Abe Lincoln's Hat. New York: Random House, 1994.

In this enjoyable story, Abe Lincoln buys a tall hat and uses it through the years to store his important papers. It is a good read-aloud book for kindergartners.

Fisher, Aileen. My First President's Day Book. Chicago: Childrens Press, 1987.

This slender book of poems is a pleasant way to introduce George Washington and Abraham Lincoln.

Kunhardt, Edith. Honest Abe. New York: Greenwillow, 1993.

This picture book tells the story of hardworking, honest Abe Lincoln as a boy, family man, and president. This is an excellent book for reading aloud.

Waber, Bernard. Just Like Abraham Lincoln. New York: Scholastic, 1964.

This wonderful picture book is about a young boy's friendship with his neighbor who looks like Abe Lincoln. The story reveals a lot about the real Lincoln. This is a delightful read-aloud.

Procedure

Say: We have been learning about special Americans. Can you name the two special Americans we have learned about? (Washington and Jefferson) Allow children to recall the contributions made by these two Americans that classify them as special.

Say: Today we are going to learn about another special American who was also an American president. This man, however, was born many years after Washington and Jefferson. This man did not know Jefferson and Washington.

Say: The special American we are going to learn about is Abraham Lincoln. Ask: Have you ever heard of Abraham Lincoln? (Allow children to share any information they may already have about Lincoln.)

Read one of the books listed above. If you do not have access to a good book about Lincoln, the following information, paraphrased from What Your Kindergartner Needs to Know by E.D. Hirsch and John Holdren, should be shared with the children.

Abraham Lincoln was a special American whom people called "Honest Abe." He was President of the United States a long time after George Washington.

Abe is the short name for Abraham. When Abe was a young boy, he grew up on the frontier. There weren't very many people around. His family was not rich. They lived in a small log cabin with only one window.

Abe helped his father with the farm work. He chopped trees and plowed fields. He grew

BCP DRAFT HIST/GEOG 44

Kindergarten - History/Geography - Lesson 17

very strong from all of his hard work. But at night, when the work was done, he wasn't too tired to work hard at something else: he taught himself to read. Abe grew to love books and read as many as he could.

Ask: What other special American was a book lover? (Jefferson)

Abe had a hard time finding books to read. Remember he lived far from the big cities. There were no libraries and not many people. Abe would sometimes walk for miles just to borrow a book from a far-off neighbor. One of his favorite books told about the life of George Washington.

There is a story people tell about Young Abe Lincoln and that book about George Washington. The book did not belong to Abe, he borrowed it from a neighbor. Abe would read at night until it was time to go to sleep. To keep the book safe, he stuck it between two logs in the cabin. But one night it rained, and the book was ruined. The very next morning Abe took the book to its owner. He said that he had ruined the book, and he offered to pay for it. The man who owned the book was not angry with Abe, because he told the truth.

As a young man, Abraham Lincoln split wood into fence rails for his neighbors. He worked on a boat, and as a postman, and as a storekeeper. Once, when he was minding the store, a customer paid him six cents too much. When Abe Lincoln realized the mistake, he walked six miles to return the money to her.

For much of his life, Lincoln was known as "Honest Abe." Which other special American was known for his honesty? (Washington)

It's good that hardworking, honest Abe Lincoln became our country's president when he did. He led our country through some of its most difficult times.

Conclude with the children that Abraham Lincoln is worthy of the classification of Special American.

Tell the children that George Washington and Abraham Lincoln were both born in the month of February, although many years apart. Explain that each year America honors these special Americans on Presidents' Day.

Read the following poem:

Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln lived long ago.

There were so many things he wanted to know,

That he lay on the floor and studied at night.

He read and did math in the dim firelight.

President Lincoln was called "Honest Abe."

He lived in the White House and helped free the slaves.

He was tall and kind our history books say,

We think of him each year on his special day.

Colleen L. Reece





BCP DRAFT HIST/GEOG 45

Kindergarten - History/Geography - Lesson 17


Suggested Follow-Up Activity

Continue the Special Americans Booklet.

1. Duplicate the profile of Lincoln for each child (attached).

2. Show the pennies you have collected. Discuss the name and value of the coin. Show children the picture of Lincoln on the front and the picture of the Lincoln Memorial on the back.

3. Allow children to make a coin rubbing of the penny somewhere on their Lincoln profile paper. Children should place the coin under the paper and gently color over the coin with a colored or lead pencil.

4. Instruct children to draw a picture of something they have learned about Lincoln. Pictures of books, a log cabin, working in a field, or a stove-pipe hat would be appropriate.

5. Save the completed paper until the conclusion of this unit when all the Special American papers will be made into a booklet.


BCP DRAFT HIST/GEO 45a

Kindergarten - History/Geography - Lesson 17

Abraham Lincoln

BCP DRAFT HIST/GEO 46

Kindergarten - History/Geography - Lesson 18

Objectives

Identify Theodore Roosevelt as a special American.

Recognize the contributions Theodore Roosevelt made to the United States.

Materials

One of the books about Theodore Roosevelt

Roosevelt profile paper (one per student) attached

Red or blue construction paper (8 x 11) two per student

Crayons

Suggested Titles

Fritz, Jean. Bully For You, Teddy Roosevelt! New York: Putnam, 1990.

This biography follows the life of Theodore Roosevelt discussing his conservation work, hunting expeditions, family life, and political career. It is too complex to read aloud to kindergartners. It is an excellent teacher reference.

Monjo, F.N. The One Bad Thing About Father. New York: Harper & Row, 1970.

This book is appropriate for reading aloud. It is an easy-to-read fictional account of the adventures of the Roosevelt children while their father, Theodore Roosevelt, was president.

Provensen, Alice. The Buck Stops Here. New York: Harper & Row, 1990.

This book is filled with details that tell the history of the Presidents of the United States in humorous, rhymed text. The illustrations help relate the presidents to their accomplishments. The pages on Theodore Roosevelt are quite good.

Quackenbush, Robert. Don't You Dare Shoot That Bear! A Story of Theodore Roosevelt. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice Hall, 1984.

This is too complex a book to read aloud to kindergartners. It is an informative teacher resource.

Procedure

Review with the class the special Americans you have studied so far. Children should be familiar with Washington, Jefferson, and Lincoln.

Say: Today we are going to finish our booklets of Special Americans with one more person. Today we are going to learn about Theodore Roosevelt.

Share information regarding the life and presidency of Theodore Roosevelt. You may wish to read aloud The One Bad Thing About Father by F.N. Monjo (Harper & Row).

If you do not have access to information about Theodore Roosevelt, the following information should be shared with the children. This information is paraphrased from What Your Kindergartner Needs to Know by E.D. Hirsch and John Holdren.

Theodore Roosevelt was the twenty-sixth president of the United States. He didn't like the nickname "Teddy," though many people called him that.

When he was a little boy, Theodore was not very healthy. He had trouble breathing and he could not see well. But his sickness did not stand in the way of his desire to do something important with his life.

Theodore worked on making both his mind and body stronger. He read many books. He wanted to learn everything he could about nature. He collected bugs, mice, birds, and other creatures for his own little museum.

His father built a gymnasium in their home, and Theodore exercised every day. He worked hard and his body became strong. When Theodore grew up, he became a boxer, a hunter, a cowboy, a crime fighter, a writer - and a president of the United States.

Theodore loved to be outdoors, and he enjoyed hunting. He also believed in playing by the rules and being fair. Once, on a hunting trip, someone who was with President Roosevelt fired at a little bear and missed. The President had a perfect shot at the bear, but he refused to shoot. Teddy Roosevelt said it wasn't fair to shoot a bear of that young age.

The story of the President's hunting trip was told in the newspapers around America. The papers showed a drawing of Teddy Roosevelt with his arm around a little bear. The newspapers wrote about Theodore Roosevelt's sense of fair play. The toy companies got the idea to make little stuffed bears and called them Teddy Bears, after our "Fair Play President," Theodore Roosevelt another special American!

Theodore Roosevelt continued to show a great love and respect for nature. During his presidency he established laws to protect the birds, fish, and wildlife of America.

Suggested Follow-Up Activities

Complete the Special Americans Booklet.

1. Duplicate the profile of Theodore Roosevelt for each child (attached).

2. Instruct children to draw a picture of something they have learned about Roosevelt on the profile. A Teddy Bear, bugs or small creatures, or a hunting scene would be appropriate.

3. Distribute the other Special American papers you have collected. Assist children in stacking their papers and creating a construction paper cover. Staple the papers together. Children may wish to decorate the front cover.

Reinforce that the Teddy Bear was named for Theodore Roosevelt. You may wish to read some bear books (there are hundreds to choose from!), sing The Bear Went Over the Mountain again, or even bring in Teddy Bears for the day.

BCP DRAFT HIST/GEO 47a

Kindergarten - History/Geography - Lesson 18

Theodore Roosevelt

BCP DRAFT HIST/GEO 48

Kindergarten - History/Geography - Lesson 19

Objectives

Review the contributions of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, and Theodore Roosevelt.

Recognize Mount Rushmore as a national symbol honoring Washington, Jefferson, Lincoln, and Roosevelt.

Materials

A picture of Mount Rushmore (attached)

A classroom size U.S. map

Tape measure

Colored chalk

Clay

Small sculpting tools (paper clips, plastic spoons, toothpicks)

Suggested Title

Prolman, Mindy. The Story of Mount Rushmore, Chicago: Childrens Press, 1969.

This book is too difficult to be used as a read aloud. However, it contains information that may be of interest to the teacher. There are some pictures, but they are not of the best quality.

Procedure

Compare the qualities that each of the special Americans studied in this unit share. Review that Washington and Lincoln were known for their honesty. Roosevelt, Lincoln, and Jefferson were all very interested in reading and learning as much as they could. All the men showed concern for others and for nature, and each had a love of America deep enough to put leading America ahead of any other personal desires.

Say: There is a famous monument designed to honor these special Americans. It is called Mount Rushmore and it is located in South Dakota. (Located South Dakota on the U.S. map, point out Baltimore and compare the distance to Mount Rushmore.)

Show a picture of Mount Rushmore. You may use the picture attached or find another one in an encyclopedia, book, or magazine. Help children identify the presidents.

Say: Mount Rushmore is a big mountain of solid rock. The faces of Washington, Lincoln, Jefferson, and Roosevelt are carved into the side of the mountain. Each face is about 60 feet tall. We will see how big that is in a moment.

Ask: What kinds of tools do you think the workers would use to carve the monument? (Allow children to speculate.)

Say: The monument was made by using dynamite to remove large chunks of stone. Then workers were lowered in cages and used drills and jackhammers to work on the eyes, noses, and chins of the faces. Finally, hammers and chisels were used to add the final touches. It took fourteen years to complete the project. The pieces of rock that were chipped away can still be seen at the base of the mountain.

BCP DRAFT HIST/GEO 49

Kindergarten - History/Geography - Lesson 19

Help children realize the vastness of Mount Rushmore. Take the children to a large area such as the playground, hallway, or cafeteria. Use the tape measure and chalk to outline some of the following dimensions:

Suggested Follow-Up Activities

1. Duplicate the picture of Mount Rushmore for each child (attached).

2. Children may color the picture. Point out the size of the trees in comparison to the monument. Children should color the sky above the monument, too.

Allow the children to try their hand at sculpting. Provide clay and small sculpting tools (paper clips, plastic spoons, toothpicks). Before beginning, encourage children to decide what they would like to carve. Suggest their own faces as a possible project.

BCP DRAFT HIST/GEO 49a

Kindergarten - History/Geography - Lesson 19

Name__________________________________

Mount Rushmore

Color the picture of Mount Rushmore.

BCP DRAFT HIST/GEO 50

Kindergarten - History/Geography - Lesson 20

Objectives

Identify Bill Clinton as the current United States president.

Recognize the White House as a national symbol and the home of the president.

Materials

A classroom size U.S. map

A picture of Bill Clinton (obtained from a magazine or newspaper)

A picture of the White House (the titles below all contain a picture)

If I Were President paper (attached)

Suggested Titles

Krementz, Jill. A Visit to Washington, D.C. New York: Scholastic, 1987.

Good for reading aloud, this book features a six-year-old boy who introduces the sights of Washington, D.C. to the reader.

Lumley, Katherine. District of Columbia: In Words & Pictures. Chicago: Childrens Press, 1981.

The simple text and pictures of famous sites in Washington, including the White House, make this book an excellent choice for reading aloud.

McMullan, Kate. The Story of Bill Clinton and Al Gore, Our Nation's Leaders. New York: Dell, 1993.

Although too complicated to read aloud, this book contains many photographs of the current president and vice-president.

Munro, Roxie. The Inside-Outside Book of Washington, D.C. New York: Dutton, 1987.

Detailed drawings portray many famous buildings of Washington, D.C. from in and outside. This is a nice book to share with the children.

Waters, Kate. The Story of the White House. New York: Scholastic, 1991.

This book is a colorful photo essay about the White House and its history. It is suitable for reading aloud.

Procedure

Say: We have learned about four famous United States presidents. There have been many other presidents of the United States. Remember that the president is the leader of our country and that the people of America choose whom we want to lead us. Every four years, grown-ups in the United States get to choose the person they want to be their president. That's called voting. In America, we vote to choose our president.

Ask: Do you know who the president of the United States is right now?

Say: Bill Clinton is the president of the United States. In November, the grown-ups voted to keep Mr. Clinton as our president. This is his second time to be voted as president. (Show the picture of Bill Clinton that you have obtained from a magazine or newspaper.)

If you have access to The Story of Bill Clinton and Al Gore, Our Nation's Leaders by Kate McMullan, you may wish to share it at this time.

Say: The president lives in a special house. Do you know what the name of the president's house is?

Say: The president's house is called the White House. It is in Washington, D.C. (Locate Washington, D.C. on the map, point out its close proximity to Baltimore. Allow children who have visited the White House and Washington, D.C. to share their impressions.)

BCP DRAFT HIST/GEOG 51

Kindergarten - History/Geography - Lesson 20

Say: The White House has 132 rooms. Visitors may tour some of the first-floor rooms. The second floor is home for the president and his family. The White House has many special rooms. It even has a private bowling alley, movie theater, and swimming pool!

Read one of the books about the White House listed above.

The children may enjoy the following information regarding children who lived in the White House.

Many of the presidents have had children who lived in the White House with them. Abraham Lincoln's youngest son, Tad, loved to play in the White House. He once wore a soldier's uniform and bombarded the Cabinet Room door with a toy cannon.

Another president, James Garfield, lived in the White House with his family. His sons liked to have pillow fights in the East Room. They raced on the polished floors of the White House on large-wheeled tricycles.

The lively family of Theodore Roosevelt turned the White House into a play house. The younger ones roller skated through hallways. Quentin, Theodore's youngest son, loved animals. Once he borrowed a selection of snakes from a pet store. He burst in on an important meeting and dropped the snakes on his father's desk, quickly ending the meeting. When another of Theodore's sons got the measles, Quentin decided a visit from the family pony would cheer him up. He snuck the pony onto an elevator and took it to his brother's bedroom.

President John F. Kennedy's son was just two months old when the family moved into the White House. Little "John-John" as he was called, liked to crawl around his father's feet and hide behind a panel in the president's desk. "John-John" turned the president's desk into his own special fort.

Amy Carter was ten when her dad, Jimmy Carter, became president. Amy had a homework assignment that she didn't quite understand. She asked for help from her mother who also didn't know the answer. Her mother called some of the president's helpers to answer the question. They sent a delivery truck to the White House full of computer printouts. They thought the question came from the president and worked all weekend trying to find out the answer to Amy's homework question.

Today, Chelsea Clinton lives in the White House with her mom and dad, Hillary and Bill Clinton, our president and the First Lady.

Suggested Follow-Up Activity

Allow children to illustrate on the attached paper what they would do if they were president of the United States. You may wish to record the children's dictations explaining their illustration.

BCP DRAFT HIST/GEO 51a

Kindergarten - History/Geography- Lesson 20

Name________________________________

 

If I Were President . . .

BCP DRAFT HIST/GEOG 52

Kindergarten - History/Geography - Special Americans

Bibliography

Suggested Read Aloud Titles

*Adler, David. A Picture Book of George Washington. New York: Holiday House, 1989.

*Adler, David. George Washington: Father of Our Country. New York: Holiday House, 1988.

*Adler, David. A Picture Book of Thomas Jefferson. New York: Holiday House, 1990.

*Anno, Mitsumasa. Anno's U.S.A. New York: Philomel, 1983.

*Brenner, Martha. Abe Lincoln's Hat. New York: Random House, 1994.

*Brown, Marc. Arthur Meets the President. Boston: Little Brown, 1991.

*D'Aulaire, Ingri and Edgar. George Washington. Garden City: Doubleday, 1936.

*Fisher, Aileen. My First Presidents' Day Book. Chicago: Childrens Press, 1987.

Goodman, Beth. A Picture Book of the U.S.A. New York: Scholastic, 1991.

*Greene, Carol. George Washington: First President of the United States. Chicago: Childrens Press, 1991.

*Krementz, Jill. A Visit to Washington, D.C. New York: Scholastic, 1987.

*Kunhardt, Edith. Honest Abe. New York: Greenwillow, 1993.

*Lumley, Katherine. District of Columbia: In Words & Pictures. Chicago: Childrens Press, 1981.

*Lye, Keith. Take a Trip to Canada. New York: Franklin Watts, 1984.

*Lye, Keith. Take a Trip to Mexico. New York: Franklin Watts, 1982

*Monjo, F.N. The One Bad Thing About Father. New York: Harper & Row, 1970.

*Munro, Roxie. The Inside-Outside Book of Washington, D.C. New York; Dutton, 1987.

*Provensen, Alice. The Buck Stops Here. New York: Harper & Row, 1990.

*Provensen, Martin, and Alice Provensen. Town and Country. New York: Crown, 1984.

*Robbins, Ken. City/Country: A Car Trip in Photographs. New York: Viking, 1985.

*Quackenbush, Robert. I Did It With My Hatchet: A Story of George Washington. New York: Pippin, 1989.

*Waber, Bernard. Just Like Abraham Lincoln. New York: Scholastic, 1964.

*Waters, Kate. The Story of the White House. New York: Scholastic, 1991.

Suggested Reference Titles

*Fritz, Jean. Bully For You, Teddy Roosevelt! New York: Putnam, 1990.

*McMullan, Kate. The Story of Bill Clinton and Al Gore, Our Nation's Leaders. New York: Dell, 1993.

*Prolman, Mindy. The Story of Mount Rushmore. Chicago: Childrens Press, 1969.

*Quackenbush, Robert. Don't You Dare Shoot That Bear! A Story of Theodore Roosevelt.

Englewood Cliffs: Prentice Hall, 1984.

*indicates annotation in a lesson