BCP DRAFT LIT 74

Kindergarten - Literature - February - Overview

The literature lessons for February include three poems and several Aesop's Fables. The saying The early bird gets the worm is covered in a February Art/Craft Lesson.

The Core Knowledge Content for Kindergarten lists four Aesop's Fables to be read aloud at this level. Several more Aesop's Fables will be read at the First Grade level; therefore, limit your study of Aesop to the four fables included in the lesson plans for this month.

There are many volumes of Aesop's Fables. The following list is suggested for the kindergarten level due to appealing illustrations and appropriate read aloud text.

Suggested Titles

Aesop's Fables. Illustrated by Heidi Holder. New York: Puffin, 1991.

Aesop's Fables. Illustrated by Michael Hauge. New York: Holt, 1985.

Anno, Mitsumasa. Anno's Aesop: A Book of Fables by Aesop & Mr. Fox. New York: Orchard,

1989.

Clark, Margaret. The Best of Aesop's Fables. Boston: Little Brown, 1990.

Miller, Edna. Mousekin's Fables. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice Hall, 1982.

There are also several videos of Aesop's Fables. One in particular that is quite good is:

Aesop's Fables: Bill Cosby. Irvine, CA: Karl Lorimar Home Video, 1986.

This is a 30 minute video. Bill Cosby plays the part of Aesop and retells, through live action and animation, the fable The Tortoise and the Hare.

BCP DRAFT LIT 75

Kindergarten - Literature - Aesop's Fables - Lesson 1 - The Lion and the Mouse

Objectives

Attend to the reading of The Lion and the Mouse.

Understand that a fable includes a message that teaches a lesson.

Understand the moral Little friends may be great friends.

Materials

A book of Aesop's Fables that includes The Lion and the Mouse (see the overview for suggestions)

Lion and Mouse puppet paper, one per student (attached)

Crayons

Craft sticks (two per student)

Procedure

Say: We are going to be reading some stories that are called fables. A fable is a special kind of story that teaches a lesson. People have been telling some fables over and over for hundreds of years. Many of these fables were told by a man named Aesop (EE-sop), who lived in Greece a very, very long time ago.

Aesop told these stories because he wanted people to behave in nice ways. Aesop knew that people don't like to be told when they're bad. That is why many of his fables have animals in them. The animals sometimes talk and act like people. In fact, the animals behave just as well and just as badly as people do. That's because, even when a fable is about animals, it is really about people. Through these stories about animals, Aesop teaches us about how we should act as people.

At the end of each fable, Aesop tells us a lesson we should learn. The lesson is called the moral of the story.

 

Say: The first fable we are going to read is called The Lion and the Mouse.

Say: Let's think about how different these two animals are. Can you name some of the ways in which these animals are different? (Allow children to respond.)

Say: Listen carefully and see if you can figure out what Aesop wants us to learn from this fable. Read The Lion and the Mouse from any of the collections listed in the overview.

Following the reading of the fable help children understand the moral Little friends may be great friends.

Suggested Follow-Up Activity

Allow children to make stick puppets of Lion and Mouse. They may enjoy reenacting the fable.

Review compassion from the Literature Lesson The Ugly Duckling. Discuss how the virtue of compassion relates to this fable.

Review friendship from the Winnie-The-Pooh Literature lesson. Discuss what makes a good friend and how to treat friends.



BCP DRAFT LIT 75a

Kindergarten - Literature - Aesop's Fables - The Lion and the Mouse

Mouse and Lion Stick Puppets





BCP DRAFT LIT 75b

Kindergarten - Literature - Aesop's Fables - The Lion and the Mouse

Mouse and Lion Stick Puppets



BCP DRAFT LIT 76

Kindergarten - Literature - Aesop's Fables - Lesson 2 - The Dog and His Shadow

Objectives

Review that a fable is a story with a moral or lesson.

Understand the moral If you are greedy, you may lose everything.

Experiment with shadows.

Materials

A book of Aesop's Fables that includes The Dog and His Shadow (see overview for suggestions)

A bright lamp (a filmstrip projector works fine)

Screen or light-colored wall to catch shadows

Objects with different shapes to use in creating shadows (pencil, plastic spoon and fork, scissors)

Procedure

Say: Today we are going to read another Aesop's fable. Who remembers why Aesop told fables? (to teach lessons) What was the moral or lesson from the fable The Lion and the Mouse? (Little friends may be great friends.)

Say: The fable today is called The Dog and His Shadow. Do you know what a shadow is? (Allow children to tell what they may already know about shadows.)

Provide an opportunity for children to experiment with shadows. Shine the projector light on the screen or light-colored wall. Hold different-shaped objects in front of the light to cast their shadows on the screen. Allow children to hold their hands in front of the light to make shadows. Point out that shadows are made when something blocks the path of the light.

Ask: Can we make shadows in the dark? (Try it, children should conclude that when it is totally dark, shadows cannot be made. They may notice that when it is partially dark, faint shadows can be made.)

Ask: How is a shadow different from the real object? (Use an object as an example. Assist children in understanding that a shadow is like an outline in the shape of an object.)

Say: In the fable The Dog and His Shadow the dog doesn't know as much about shadows as you do. Listen carefully to the fable and the lesson we should learn from it.

Read The Dog and His Shadow from one of the books listed in the overview.

Assist children in understanding the moral If you are greedy, you may lose everything. Explain that being greedy means wanting everything for yourself and not sharing what you have with others.

Allow children to tell about times in their lives when they have witnessed greed. Firm up that greediness is a negative character trait and one that people should strive to avoid.

Suggested Follow-Up Activity

Take the children outside on a sunny day to continue to explore shadows. Point out that the sun is the light source that makes shadows possible. Explain that shadows are only visible on sunny days.

Tell children to find their own shadows and explore how a person's shadow moves as the person moves. Children may enjoy playing "shadow tag" where they try to step on each other's shadow.

See the February Art/Craft Lesson on Groundhog Day for further exploration of shadows.

BCP DRAFT LIT 77

Kindergarten - Literature - Aesop's Fables - Lesson 3 - The Grasshopper and the Ants

Objectives

Review that a fable is a story with a moral or lesson.

Attend to the reading of The Grasshopper and the Ants.

Participate in a discussion about work ethic.

Materials

A book of Aesop's Fables that includes The Grasshopper and the Ants (see overview for suggestions)

Procedure

Say: We have been reading some Aesop's Fables. Remember that a fable is a story with a moral or lesson.

Ask: Can you remember what the lesson was from The Dog and His Shadow? (If you are greedy, you may lose everything.)

Say: Today our fable is called The Grasshopper and the Ants.

Ask: How many of you have seen a grasshopper and an ant before? (Allow children to discuss where they have seen these insects, what they look like, etc.)

Say: Listen carefully to this fable. I want you to decide what the lesson of this story should be.

Read The Grasshopper and the Ants from one of the books listed in the overview.

Allow children to speculate what the moral of the story is before you tell them. Guide them to conclude the moral has to do with work ethic.

Engage the children in a discussion about work. Ask such questions as: What are you going to be when you grow up? Why do you want to do that job? Discuss with the children the joy of work, of a job well done and the feeling of accomplishment.

Continue the discussion with the adage "Anything worth doing is worth doing well." Explain that if there is a job to be done, we should always do it to the best of our ability.

Review previously read stories that have a work ethic tone such as "The Little Red Hen" and "The Three Little Pigs."

Suggested Follow-Up Activity

Teach children the words to the song Whistle While You Work. Perhaps the children will enjoy singing or whistling the tune during independent work times or clean up times.

Read other books about work ethic. The Tortilla Factory by Gary Paulson (Harcourt) and The Hero of Bremen by Margaret Hodges (Holiday) are both wonderful stories to share with your students.

Teach children the song The Ants Go Marching (tune of When Johnny Comes Marching Home). Children may enjoy pantomiming the actions of "the littlest ant."











BCP DRAFT LIT 78

Kindergarten - Literature - Aesop's Fables - The Grasshopper and the Ants



The Ants Go Marching

The ants go marching one by one, Hurrah! Hurrah!

The ants go marching one by one, Hurrah! Hurrah!

The ants go marching one by one,

The little one stopped to suck his thumb,

And they all went marching down,

in the Earth, to get out of the rain, boom, boom, boom . . .

Verses:

2. Two by two, the little one stopped to tie his shoe;

3. Three by three, the little one stopped to climb a tree;

4. Four by four, the little one stopped to shut the door;

5. Five by five, the little one stopped to scratch his thigh;

6. Six by six, the little one stopped to pick up sticks;

7. Seven by seven, the little one stopped to go to heaven;

8. Eight by eight, the little one stopped to slam the gate;

9. Nine by nine, the little one said, "I'm behind";

10. Ten by ten, the little one said, "This is the end."

BCP DRAFT LIT 79

Kindergarten - Literature - Aesop's Fables - Lesson 4 - The Hare and the Tortoise

Objectives

Review that a fable is a story with a moral or lesson.

Attend to the reading of The Hare and the Tortoise.

Participate in a discussion about perseverance.

Materials

A book of Aesop's Fables that includes The Hare and the Tortoise (see overview)

Procedure

Say: We have been reading some Aesop's Fables. Today we are going to read our last one. It is called The Hare and the Tortoise.

Say: The hare is an animal. It is very similar to the rabbit. It looks like a rabbit and hops like a rabbit.

Say: The tortoise is a turtle.

Ask: Can you think of some ways that these two animals are different? (Allow children to discuss the differences in the two animals.)

Say: This fable is about these two very different animals. Listen carefully as I read the fable The Hare and the Tortoise.

Read The Hare and the Tortoise from one of the books listed in the overview.

Following the reading of the fable explain the moral of the story Slow and steady wins the race.

Say: This lesson is about perseverance. Perseverance means having a purpose and sticking to it . . . it means never giving up.

Relate perseverance to childhood experiences. Discuss how learning how to roller-skate, ride a bike, and tie shoes required perseverance. Move the discussion to accomplishments made in school such as learning letters and their sounds, counting numbers and so on. Relate these accomplishments to the virtue of perseverance.

Recall the saying Where there's a will, there's a way. You may wish to introduce the saying If at first you don't succeed, try, try again (this saying appears at the first grade level).

Give the children an opportunity to share some of the times in their lives when they showed perseverance or when perseverance was needed to accomplish a task.

Suggested Follow-Up Activities

If you have access to the video Aesop's Fables: Bill Cosby (Lorimar Home Video), you may wish to view it at this time. The video is a dramatization of the fable The Hare and the Tortoise.

Read other books about perseverance. Hip Cat by Jonathan London (Chronicle) and Amazing Grace by Mary Hoffman (Dial) are both good read-aloud choices.

Write the words fast and slow on the chalkboard. Challenge the class to think of animals and objects that can move fast or slowly. Record responses under the appropriate word on the board. The music lesson Old MacDonald also explores the concept of fast and slow.

Play "Tortoise and Hare" with the class. Organize the children in a large play area. The teacher calls out "tortoise" and the children run slowly in general space. On the command "hare" they change to a rapid circular run.

BCP DRAFT LIT 80

Kindergarten - Literature - Poetry - Roses are Red

Objectives

Recite the poem Roses are Red.

Explore and discuss colors.

Practice reading color words.

Materials

A picture of a rose and a violet (obtain from magazines or gardening books)

Coloring paper one per student (attached)

Several of the books listed below

Suggested Titles

Adoff, Arnold. Greens. New York: Lothrop, 1988.

Ardley, Neil. The Science Book of Color. San Diego: Harcourt Brace, 1991.

Brown, Margery W. Afro-Bets Book of Colors. Orange, NJ: Just Us Books, 1991.

Carle, Eric. My Very First Book of Colors. New York: HarperCollins, 1991.

Dodds, Dayle Ann. The Color Box. Boston: Little, Brown, 1992.

Ehlert, Lois. Color Zoo. New York: HarperCollins, 1989.

Ehlert, Lois. Planting a Rainbow. San Diego: Harcort Brace, 1988.

Freeman, Don. The Chalk Box Story. New York: HarperCollins, 1976.

Greeley, Valerie. White is the Moon. New York: Macmillan, 1991.

Serfozo, Norma. Who Said Red? New York: Macmillan, 1989.

Sis, Peter. Going Up! A Color Counting Book. New York: Greenwillow, 1989.

Walsh, Ellen Stoll. Mouse Paint. San Diego: Harcort Brace, 1989.

What Color? Photos by Anthea Sieveking. New York: Dial, 1991.

Procedure

Say: Today we are going to learn a simple poem about flowers.

Ask: Can you name some flowers? (Allow children to name as many flowers as they can think of.)

Say: The poem we are going to learn is about a rose and a violet. Do you know what a rose looks like? (Allow children to describe a rose, lead them to recall the scent and the thorns if they need prompting.) Show some pictures of a rose that you have collected from magazines or gardening books, include a variety of colors.

Say: The other flower in the poem is a violet. Have you ever seen a violet before? (Show a picture of a violet. Assist children in realizing the color violet is a bluish-purple color like the flower.)

Say: The poem we are going to learn is called Roses are Red. Listen to the poem while I read it.

Roses are Red

Roses are red,

Violets are blue,

Sugar is sweet,

And so are you.

BCP DRAFT LIT 81

Kindergarten - Literature - Poetry - Roses are Red

Ask: How many of you have heard that poem before?

Ask: What do you think the poem means? (Allow children to discuss.)

Ask: Who might you say this poem to? (someone that you care about)

Say: Let's learn the words together. (Teach children the words to the poem by repetitive practice.)

Ask: What two color words did you hear in that poem? (blue and red)

Ask: Can you name some things that are red? (Print the word red on the board. List children's responses under the word.)

Ask: Can you name some things that are blue? (Print the word blue on the board. List children's responses under the word.)

Ask: What is your favorite color? (Call on different children to respond.) Ask why they like that particular color.

Read some of the books listed above. All are wonderful books about color that will appeal to kindergartners.

Suggested Follow-Up Activities

Celebrate colors by having the children dress in or bring items of a designated color. Choose a different color each day for a week. Discuss things that are the color of the day, finger paint using the color of the day, write poems about that color, learn to read the color word.

Children may complete the attached coloring paper. Explain to the children that the color word on each flower is the color for all that particular flowers' petals. The stems and leaves may be colored green. Perhaps a butterfly, some clouds, or the sun could be added at the top of the paper. You may wish to distribute the paper following the week-long color celebration.







































BCP DRAFT LIT 81a

Kindergarten - Literature - Roses are Red

Name_____________________________________

Flower Garden

Read the color words. Color the flowers the correct colors.

BCP DRAFT LIT 82

Kindergarten - Literature - Poetry - Simple Simon

Objectives

Listen to the poem Simple Simon.

Identify a penny as a coin worth one cent.

Practice counting pennies.

Materials

A collection of pennies

Counting Pennies paper one per student (attached)

Crayons, glue

Procedure

Say: Today we are going to listen to a poem called Simple Simon.

Say: In this poem, Simon is on his way to a fair.

Ask: Have you ever been to a fair? What was it like? (Allow children to discuss their experiences at a fair.)

Ask: How would you tell someone who has never been to a fair what a fair is like?

Ask: What did you do at the fair? What did you eat at the fair?

Explain that there are street fairs and county fairs, art fairs, and state fairs. Discuss the festive atmosphere of all fairs and the treats that one can purchase while at a fair.

Say: Simon is on his way to the fair and runs into a man selling pies.

Ask: What do you think Simon must have in order to buy a pie from the man? (money)

Show the collection of pennies. Distribute them so the children can examine them carefully.

Ask: Does anyone know the name of this coin? (History/Geography Lesson 16 also identifies the penny.)

Ask: Do you know how much one penny is worth? (one cent)

Say: Listen while I read the poem Simple Simon and see if he is able to buy a pie.

 

Simple Simon

Simple Simon met a pieman

Going to the fair;

Said Simple Simon to the pieman,

"Let me taste your ware."

Says the pieman to Simple Simon, "Show me first your penny";

Says Simple Simon to the pieman,

"Indeed, I have not any."

Explain to the children that when Simple Simon said "Let me taste your ware," he is referring to the pie.

Ask: Was Simple Simon able to buy a pie? Why not? (He could not buy the pie because he didn't have any money.)

BCP DRAFT LIT 83

Kindergarten - Literature - Poetry - Simple Simon

Repeat the poem a few more times. Encourage children to join along as they feel comfortable with the words.

Suggested Follow-Up Activity

Assist children in completing the Counting Pennies paper (attached). Read the directions for the children.

Read a book or two about a day at the fair. The Very Bumpy Bus Ride by Michaela Munstean (Parents Magazine Press, 1993), Going to the Fair by Heather Amery and Peter Wingham (Usborne, 1986) and At the Fair by Eugene Booth (Raintree, 1977) are all good read aloud choices.

Play a game of Simon Says. Arrange the children in rows so all can see the front of the room. The teacher should play the part of "Simon." Give a variety of commands, such as "Stand up," "Clap your hands," "Turn around," and others. The command may or may not be preceded with the words "Simon says." No one is to move unless the command is preceded by these words. Those who move at the wrong time should sit out the rest of that round of play. Play ends when only one person is left standing.























































BCP DRAFT LIT 83a

Kindergarten - Literature - Poetry - Simple Simon

Name________________________________________

Counting Pennies



































- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -



Do you have enough pennies to buy this giant pie?

The pie costs 5 cents. How many pennies will you need?

Cut out the number of pennies needed to buy the pie and glue them on the pie.

You may color the picture.

BCP DRAFT LIT 84

Kindergarten - Literature - Poetry - Sing a Song of Sixpence

Objectives

Learn the poem through singing.

Explore dramatization and rhythmic movement.

Procedure

Teach children the poem Sing a Song of Sixpence by singing the familiar tune. Sing one line at a time and have children sing the line back to you until they are familiar with the words and the tune. Then add the next line and so on until the children can sing the song with you in its entirety.

Children may explore dramatic play and rhythmic movement by reenacting the poem. The "characters" are numerous enough that the whole class can participate: the king, the queen, twenty-four blackbirds (explain that four and twenty blackbirds equal twenty-four), the maid, and the blackbird who pecked off her nose. Allow creative movement to grow out of the children's ideas. Simple costuming could add the finishing touches to a fun-filled production (an apron for the maid, crowns for the king and queen, a bag for the doctor, etc.).

Sing a Song of Sixpence

Sing a song of sixpence, a pocket full of rye,

Four and twenty blackbirds baked in a pie!

When the pie was opened the birds began to sing.

Wasn't that a dainty dish to set before the King?

The King was in the counting house, counting out his money;

The Queen was in the parlor, eating bread and honey;

The maid was in the garden, hanging out the clothes;

Along came a blackbird and pecked off her nose!