BCP DRAFT HIST/GEOG 53

Kindergarten - History/Geography - March Overview

March lessons continue the study of the seven continents. Europe and Asia are introduced this month. Children should be able to identify the continents, name a few landmarks, identify a few animals, and gain an understanding of the people who live there.

BCP DRAFT HIST/GEOG 54

Kindergarten - History/Geography - Lesson 21

Objectives

Recall the names and locations of the seven continents and four oceans.

Identify Asia as the largest continent in the world.

Color a map of Asia.

Materials

A classroom size world map

Copies of the map of Asia (attached) one per student

Crayons

Suggested Title

Anno, Mitsumasa. All in a Day. New York: Philomel, 1986.

Brief text and illustrations reveal a day in the lives of children in eight different countries including England, Japan, and the United States. Similarities and differences are noted in the illustrations, however, the commonality of humankind is emphasized. This book is an excellent way to introduce the continents of Europe and Asia.

Procedure

Say: Today we are going to begin some lessons about the largest continent in the world.

Draw attention to the world map. Call on several children to identify North America and Africa. Remind children that those two continents have already been studied.

Ask: Can you look at the map and point to the continent that is the largest one in the world? Can you name that continent? (Allow children to respond. Sing the Continent Song again if necessary to help children name the continent of Asia.)

Say: We are going to learn about the continent of Asia. It is the largest continent in the world and home to many, many people.

Ask: What do we call the people who live in America? (Americans) What do we call the people who live in Africa? (Africans) Ask: Can you guess what the people who live in Asia are called? (Allow children to respond.) Say: The people of Asia are called Asians.

Say: Look carefully at the map. Asia is bordered by water on three sides. The Pacific Ocean, the Indian Ocean, and the Arctic Ocean all touch the continent of Asia. There are also many large mountain chains in Asia. (Point out the various mountain chains on the map.)

If you have access to the book All in a Day read it at this time. Draw attention to the child representing Japan. Identify Japan as a country in Asia. Tell the children they will be learning more about Japan in an upcoming lesson. Identify the child representing Chicago as an American who lives in the United States.

Distribute the map of Asia. Children should lightly color the map yellow and the oceans blue. Color the mountain peaks brown.











BCP DRAFT HIST/GEOG 54a

Kindergarten - History/Geography - Lesson 21

Name___________________________________________

Asia

Lightly color the continent of Asia yellow. Color the Pacific, Indian, and Arctic oceans blue.

BCP DRAFT HIST/GEOG 55

Kindergarten - History/Geography - Lesson 22

Objectives

Recall that Asia is the largest continent in the world.

Infer that many countries are located in Asia.

Identify the Great Wall of China.

Materials

A classroom size world map

A book with photographs or illustrations about China and Japan

A book with photographs or illustrations about the animals of Asia

Suggested Titles

Cobb, Vicki. This Place is Crowded: Japan. New York: Walker, 1992.

Part of the "Imagine Living There" series, this book explains what life is like in Japan. The colorful illustrations and simple text make this book suitable for reading aloud.

Grosvenor, Donna. Pandas. Washington, D.C.: National Geographic, 1973.

Simple text and full-page photographs make this book an excellent read-aloud source about the pandas of China.

Haskins, Jim. Count Your Way Through China. Minneapolis: Carolrhoda, 1987.

This book is too complicated to read in its entirety. The illustrations are good, including one of the Great Wall of China.

Kalman, Bobbie. China: The Land. New York: Crabtree Publishing, 1989.

This book is too complicated to read in its entirety but excerpts may be read aloud. The photographs are quite good and would appeal to kindergartners.

Kalman, Bobbie. Japan: The Land. New York: Crabtree Publishing, 1989.

This book is part of "The Lands, Peoples and Cultures Series" see annotation above.

Taylor, Barbara. The Animals Atlas. New York: Knopf, 1992.

This oversized text is full of beautiful illustrations of the animals of the world. The sections on Asia are quite extensive and very informative. You will want to save this book and use it again to show the animals of Europe. It is appropriate to read aloud to the children as each animal illustration includes a short description.

Procedure

Ask: Do you remember the name of the largest continent in the world? (Asia)

Draw attention to the map. Ask: Who can come to the map and touch the continent of Asia? Ask: Do you remember what the people who live in Asia are called? (Asians)

Say: Asia is home to many countries. (Point to and name several of the countries of Asia. Be sure to point out China and Japan.)

Say: We are going to learn more about two of these countries. China is a country in Asia. It is home to many, many people. (Point out China on the map.)

Say: There are more people living in China than in any other nation. Most people live in the area between two rivers and along the coast. (Point to the area between the Huang Ho and Yangtze rivers and the coast along the Yellow Sea and East China Sea.)

Say: A wall runs for miles and miles across China. A powerful leader made his people build this wall a long time ago to defend their country from enemies.

BCP DRAFT HIST/GEOG 56

Kindergarten - History/Geography - Lesson 22

Ask: How do you think a wall could defend a country from its enemies? (Allow children to speculate. Guide them to conclude that a wall could keep people and armies out of an area. Be sure they conclude that a wall capable of defending a country would have to be quite large.)

Say: This wall has watchtowers and walkways. It is so wide that you can ride six horses side by side along its top. This wall is called the Great Wall of China. (Show a picture of the Great Wall of China from one of the books you have selected.)

Share one of the books suggested above about China, or one of your own.

Say: Japan is another country in Asia. Japan is made up of four main islands and about 3,000 smaller ones. (Point to Japan on the map. Draw attention to the islands. Say: An island is a body of land surrounded by water on all sides. Note the Pacific Ocean touches Japan on one side.)

Say: Japan is a small country, yet many, many people live there. There are many rough and rugged mountains in Japan. Many of the mountains are volcanoes. A volcano is a mountain created by the flow of melted rock through an opening in the Earth's surface. Mount Fuji, the highest mountain peak, is a volcano. It has not erupted for a long time.

Ask: Do you think farmers could raise very many crops in a country full of mountains? Why not? (Allow children to respond.)

Say: There is not much land suitable for farming in Japan because it is so full of mountains. Rice is the main food crop raised in Japan.

Say: Remember Japan is an island country with water on all sides. Ask: How do you think the people of Japan could use all that water? (Allow children to speculate.)

Say: Fishing is important for the people of Japan. The sea provides food for the many people who live in Japan. Many people live on boats.

Say: There are many crowded cities in Japan, but there are also peaceful temples and beautiful gardens.

Share one of the books listed above about Japan, or one of your own.

Say: There are many animals that live in this region of Asia. Perhaps the most famous is the giant panda.

Ask: Have you ever seen a picture of a panda? (Allow children to respond. Show a picture of a panda from one of the books suggested above.)

Say: Giant pandas live in the high mountains of China. The pandas keep warm in their thick coats of black and white fur. The mountains where the giant pandas live are covered with thick bamboo forests. Bamboo is the panda's favorite food.

Ask: Do you know what bamboo looks like? It is a tall grass with a wooden stem. Many things are made out of bamboo like wind chimes and fishing poles. (Show a picture of bamboo from one of the books listed above.)

Say: The giant panda shares his mountain home with some unusual animals such as the golden snub-nosed monkey and the takin, a large shaggy animal with horns. The red panda, a little animal that looks like a raccoon, comes out at night. It climbs through the trees and eats bamboo, too.

Say: In Japan you could find some unusual animals, too. The Japanese giant salamander makes its home in the cold mountain streams of Japan. Japanese macaque monkeys live in groups of up to forty monkeys. They live in the cold, snowy mountains of northern Japan. They keep warm by taking hot baths in the volcanic mountain springs.

BCP DRAFT HIST/GEOG 57

Kindergarten - History/Geography - Lesson 22

Show photographs or illustrations of the animals of Asia.

Suggested Follow-Up Activity

You may wish to read Japanese and Chinese folktales at this time. See the Literature Lesson Momotaro, The Peach Boy for further suggestions.

BCP DRAFT HIST/GEOG 58

Kindergarten - History/Geography - Lesson 23

Objectives

Discover the people of China and Japan.

Materials

A classroom size world map

A book about the people of Japan

A book about the people of China

Suggested Titles

Ganeri, Anita. Why We Left: I Remember China. Austin, Texas: Steck-Vaughn, 1995.

Simple text and photographs make this is good choice for reading aloud. However, some of the sections (Communist China, Why I'm Here) are too sophisticated for the kindergarten child. You will want to be selective about the sections you read.

Haskins, Jim. Count Your Way Through Japan. Minneapolis: Carolrhoda, 1987.

This book is too complex to read in its entirety. The illustrations are good and would be appropriate to share with the children.

Kalman, Bobbie. Japan: The People. New York: Crabtree Publishing, 1989.

This book is part of "The Lands, Peoples, Cultures Series." It is too complicated to read in its entirety but excerpts may be read aloud. The photographs are appealing and informative.

Kalman, Bobbie. China: The People. New York: Crabtree Publishing, 1989.

See annotation above.

Morris, Ann. Bread, Bread, Bread. New York: Lothrop, Lee & Shepard, 1989.

Good photographs and basic text highlight similar items in use world-wide. This book is suitable for reading aloud.

Morris, Ann. Hats, Hats, Hats. New York: Lothrop, Lee & Shepard, 1989.

See annotation above.

Morris, Ann. Shoes, Shoes, Shoes. New York: Lothrop, Lee & Shepard, 1995.

See annotation above.

Tolan, Sally and Rhoda Sherwood. Children of the World: China. Milwaukee: Gareth Stevens, 1988.

This book is full of photographs showing children with their families, at school, at play, and in their communities. It is too complex to read aloud. You may wish to read only the captions.

Procedure

Point to Asia on the map. Ask: Who remembers the name of the largest continent in the world?

Point to Japan. Ask: Do you remember the name of this island country?

Ask: What are some things you remember about Japan? (Allow children to recall information from Lesson 22.)

Say: We have learned that Japan is a small country yet many, many people live there. The Japanese live so closely together that they have developed strict rules for good manners. When two people meet they don't kiss or shake hands. Instead they bow to each other. (You may wish

BCP DRAFT HIST/GEOG 59

Kindergarten - History/Geography - Lesson 23

to demonstrate a deep bow.) One way of showing respect is to bow very deeply. (Allow children to bow to you and to one another.)

Say: Japanese people have a love of nature. They have beautiful gardens. The branches of trees are trained to grow the way gardeners think they should. Some gardens have only a few carefully placed rocks that are surrounded by sand that has been raked in a pattern. Lanterns light the most important parts of a garden.

Say: The Japanese cherry tree is a beautiful tree. The Japanese have made gifts of cherry trees to many nations. The United States received beautiful Japanese cherry trees as a gift from the Japanese people. The trees were planted in Washington, D.C. The cherry blossoms bloom in spring. They are beautiful to see. (Allow children who have seen the cherry trees in Washington,

D.C. tell about the experience.)

Read a book about the people of Japan.

Point to China on the map. Say: This is the country in Asia with the huge wall that was built to keep out its enemies. Do you remember the name of this country? (China) Do you remember the name of the wall? (The Great Wall of China)

Say: In China older people are very special. They are respected for their knowledge and experience. Chinese grandmothers receive special treatment because they are considered to be the heads of households. The people of China feel it is their duty to care for their parents when they are too old to care for themselves.

Say: In China the school day begins early with morning exercises. At noon children take a long lunch break and then go back to class until late in the afternoon.

Ask: What are some of the things you like to do after school? (Allow children to respond.)

Say: Most students in China do not go straight home after school. Instead, they go to one of the many centers called "Children's Palaces." The children enjoy all sorts of activities like drawing, clay modeling, dancing, and gymnastics.

Read one of the books about the people of China listed above, or choose one of your own.

Suggested Follow-Up Activity

If you have not yet done so, read Japanese and Chinese folktales. See the Literature Lesson Momotaro, The Peach Boy for suggestions.

Bring in chopsticks for the children to see and try. Inexpensive wooden chopsticks are usually available at oriental food stores. Explain and demonstrate how to use chopsticks. Children may enjoy eating a small cup of popcorn with their chopsticks.

The Art/Craft Lesson and Music Lesson 18 should be taught following this lesson.

BCP DRAFT HIST/GEOG 60

Kindergarten - History/Geography - Lesson 24

Objectives

Identify Europe as a continent that touches Asia.

Color a map of Europe.

Materials

A classroom size world map

Copies of the map of Europe (attached) one per student

Crayons

A book with photographs or illustrations of the animals of Europe

Suggested Title

Anno, Mitsumasa. Anno's Journey. New York: Philomel, 1977.

This picture book is beautifully drawn by the author. Northern Europe- -the land, the people at work and play, and their art and architecture are all depicted. This is a lovely book to share with children.

Taylor, Barbara. The Animal Atlas. New York: Knopf, 1992.

This oversized text is full of beautiful illustrations of the animals of the world. The sections on Europe include the animals of the conifer forests, the woodlands, and Southern Europe. It is appropriate to read aloud to the children as each animal illustration includes a short description.

Procedure

Say: We have learned that Asia is the largest continent in the world. What are some of the things we have learned about two of the countries of Asia? (Allow children to recall information presented in Lessons 21-23 and from the books you have read regarding Asia.)

Say: Today we are going to learn about another continent. This continent is Asia's neighbor. It is the continent of Europe.

Point to Europe on the map. Say: See how Asia touches Europe? Europe is a small continent compared to Asia.

Point to the Atlantic Ocean and the Arctic Ocean. Say: Europe touches two of the four oceans of the world. Can you name these oceans? (Allow children to sing the Continent Song if necessary.)

Say: The Atlantic and Arctic oceans touch Europe on two sides. Asia is on the other side.

You may wish to review that Africa and North America also touch the Atlantic Ocean.

Ask: Do you remember what the people who live in Asia are called? (Asians)

Say: We know that the people of Asia are Asians, the people of America are Americans, and the people of Africa are Africans. Can you guess what the people of Europe are called? They are called Europeans.

Say: Like Asia, Europe is home to many countries. (Point to and name some of the countries of Europe.) We will learn more about two of the countries.

Say: There are many animals that live in Europe. Many birds live in Europe including the long-eared owl, the great spotted woodpecker, and the hoopoe. The hoopoe is named after its call, which sounds like "hoo-poo-poo."

BCP DRAFT HIST/GEOG 61

Kindergarten - History/Geography - Lesson 24

Say: The brown bear of southern Europe lives in the mountains. Bears can't see very well, so they rely on their sense of smell to find food. The brown bear eats mostly plants. It uses its long claws to dig up roots and bulbs.

If you have access to the titles above, share them at this time.

Distribute the map of Europe. Children should lightly color the map green and the ocean blue. Color the mountain peaks brown.











































































BCP DRAFT HIST/GEOG 61a

Kindergarten - History/Geography - Lesson 24

Name__________________________________

Europe

Lightly color the continent of Europe green. Color the Atlantic and Arctic oceans blue.

BCP DRAFT HIST/GEOG 62

Kindergarten - History/Geography - Lesson 25

Objectives

Recall that Europe is a continent bordered by Asia.

Identify France as a country in Europe.

Identify the Eiffel Tower.

Discover the people of France.

Materials

A classroom size world map

A book with photographs or illustrations about France

A book about the people of France

Suggested Titles

Anholt, Laurence. Camille and the Sunflowers: A Story About Vincent Van Gogh. New York: Barron's, 1994.

This lovely read-aloud book is about a young French boy and his family who befriend Van Gogh. It is a wonderful book to share with children.

Bailey, Donna & Anna Sproule. Where We Live: France. Austin, TX: Steck-Vaughn, 1991.

Photographs and simple text make this an appropriate informational book to read aloud.

Bemelmans, Ludwig. Madeline. New York: Viking, 1977.

This classic children's book is a wonderful way to introduce children to Paris. Illustrations of the Eiffel Tower and other Paris landmarks are included in this read-aloud book.

Bibbings, Susan and Gillian Wrobel. Looking at Lands: France. London: Macdonald, 1980.

This is a good informational book. The full-page photographs are wonderful to share with children. You may wish to read excerpts from the text as it is too complex to read in its entirety.

de Paola, Tomie. Bonjour, Mr. Satie. New York: Putnam, 1991.

A wonderful read-aloud, this book introduces children to the art work of Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso.

Garland, Michael. Dinner at Magritte's. New York: Dutton, 1995.

Find this book if you can! A young French boy spends the day with surrealist artists Rene Magritte and Salvador Dali. This is a great read-aloud book and a fun way to introduce children to these famous artists. An illustration and reference are made to this month's saying "It's raining cats and dogs."

Jacobsen, Peter Otto and Preben Sejer Kristensen. A Family in France. New York: Bookwright Press, 1984.

This informational book is suitable for sharing with children. It includes photographs of many famous French landmarks including the Eiffel Tower. You may wish to read excerpts and captions, however, as it is too complex to read in its entirety.









BCP DRAFT HIST/GEOG 63

Kindergarten - History/Geography - Lesson 25

Procedure

Point to the continent of Europe. Ask: Who remembers the name of this continent? (Europe)

Point to Asia. Ask: Do you remember the name of the continent that is a neighbor of

Europe?

Say: Europe is home to many countries. (Point to and name some of the countries of Europe.)

Say: Today we are going to learn about the country of France. (Point to France on the map.)

Say: France is one of the largest countries in Europe. It is a beautiful country. Snow-capped mountains, sunny beaches, fishing villages, and wooded valleys can all be found in France.

Say: Paris is a large city in France. Everywhere in Paris you will see colorful restaurants along the streets. It is fun to sit at the tables and watch the people go by. A famous French landmark is located in Paris. A landmark is an object that a particular place is known for. The famous French landmark is called the Eiffel Tower. (Show a picture of the Eiffel Tower.) The Eiffel Tower is made of metal. You can ride to the top of the tower in an elevator and look out over the city.

Say: There are many people who live in France. Many of the people are farmers. They raise cattle and crops. Grapes are one of the most important crops of France. Many people work in the vineyards. A vineyard is the place where grapes are grown.

Ask: Have you ever been to a bowling alley? Do you know how to bowl? (Allow children to respond.)

Say: The French people play a game that is like bowling. It is called boules. The game is played outside. Players stand in a circle drawn on the ground. They toss or roll a ball toward a target ball several feet away. It is an exciting game played by people of all ages.

Conclude the lesson on France by reading several of the titles listed above about France and the people who live there.

Suggested Follow-Up Activity

Teach the children Frere Jacques.

Frere Jacques

Fre-re Jac-ques, Fre-re Jac-ques, Dor-mez vous? Dor-mez vous?

(Are you sleeping? Are you sleeping? Brother John. Brother John.)

Son-nez les ma-ti-nes. Son-nez les ma-ti-nes.

(Morning bells are ringing. Morning bells are ringing.)

Din don din. Din don din.

(Ding dong ding. Ding dong ding.)









BCP DRAFT HIST/GEOG 64

Kindergarten - History/Geography - Lesson 25

Conduct a class cooking lesson and make crepes.

Crepes

(French Pancakes)

2 eggs cup flour

2/3 cup milk 1/4 teaspoon salt

1 Tablespoon shortening dash of sugar

Beat eggs. Add milk and shortening. Sift flour, salt and sugar together and add to eggs. Beat until smooth. Drop batter on a greased griddle. Cook until brown. Turn once. Fill the crepe with jam, roll and serve.

BCP DRAFT HIST/GEOG 65

Kindergarten - History/Geography - Lesson 26

Objectives

Recall that Europe is a continent bordered by Asia.

Recall that France is a country in Europe.

Identify England as a country in Europe.

Discover the people of England.

Materials

A classroom size world map

A book with photographs or illustrations of England

A book about the people of England

Suggested Titles

Bemelmans, Ludwig. Madeline in London. New York: Puffin, 1977.

This is a wonderful read-aloud book. Madeline explores London and sees many aspects of British life. Illustrations of famous London sites are included.

Munro, Roxie. The Inside-Outside Book of London. New York: Dutton, 1989.

Detailed drawings portray many famous sites of London from in and outside. This is a nice book to share with the children.

Penny, Malcolm. Looking at Lands: Great Britain. London: Macdonald, 1981.

The full-page photographs of the regions of England are suitable for sharing with children. This is too complex a book to read in its entirety.

St. John, Jetty. A Family in England. Minneapolis: Lerner, 1988.

This is a good informational book. Photographs of a typical family as well as some famous landmarks make this a nice book to share with the children. It is too complex to read in its entirety. You may wish to read only excerpts.

Wood, Audrey. King Bidgood's in the Bathtub. San Diego: Harcourt, 1985.

This is a delightful read-aloud book about English royalty. The illustrations are magnificent.

Procedure

Point to the continent of Europe. Ask: Who remembers the name of this continent? Can you name a country from the continent of Europe?

Ask: What are some of the things you remember about the country of France? (Allow children to recall information from Lesson 25.)

Say: Today we are going to learn about another country in Europe. It is an island country.

Ask: Do you remember the name of the island country we learned about in Asia? (Japan)

Say: The island country we are going to learn about today is called Great Britain. (Point to Great Britain on the map. Draw attention to the island shape. Say: An island is a body of land surrounded by water on all sides.)

Say: Great Britain is made up of three countries: England, Scotland, and Wales. We are going to learn about England today. (Locate England on the map.)

Say: There are small farms, open stretches of grassland, a coastline of beaches and large cities in England. Most people in England live in cities.

BCP DRAFT HIST/GEOG 66

Kindergarten - History/Geography - Lesson 26

Say: London is a big city in England. The streets of London are jammed with people who have come by bus, car or train from the edges of the city to work in the banks, offices and shops.

Ask: Do you remember the song London Bridge? London Bridge is a bridge over the Thames River in London. Many people travel over the London Bridge to get into the city.

Teacher Information: The first stone bridge across the Thames River was completed in 1209. Its wooden piles were always cracking under the strong current. The timber shops and houses along the length of the bridge were plagued by fire. The nursery rhyme London Bridge was written because the old London Bridge was famous for falling down, although it stood until 1826 when demolition was begun to make a new bridge. The new London Bridge was completed in 1831. The 1,005 foot granite-faced structure had five arches and carried four lanes of traffic. In 1968, 10,000 tons of its granite facing were sold to developers in Arizona. The blocks were removed piece by piece and shipped to Arizona. The bridge was rebuilt in 1969-1971. In its new location, the bridge spans the Little Thames River, a mile-long channel of water diverted from the Colorado River. At the original site across the Thames River in London, a third London Bridge was opened to traffic in stages between 1970 and 1972.

Say: The children of England go to school and play just like children all over the world.

Ask: Do you remember where the children of China go after school? (They go to centers called Children's Palaces.)

Say: Many of the children of England play sports after school. One of the most popular sports is a game called cricket. Almost every town and village in England has a cricket pitch. A cricket pitch is the field where the game is played. Cricket is played with a bat and a ball. It looks a little like baseball, but it is very different.

Say: There are many famous buildings in London. You can see Buckingham Palace and "Big Ben" if you go to London. Buckingham Palace is where the Queen of England lives. There is a large clock tower in London. The name of the bell that rings the hour in the clock tower is "Big Ben." (Show photographs of Buckingham Palace and Big Ben from the books listed above.)

Say: Afternoon tea is an old English tradition. Every afternoon around 4:00 p.m. people stop and have a cup of hot tea. In addition to drinking tea, people eat cookies, cakes, and sometimes sandwiches.

If you have the book All in a Day (annotated in Hist/Geog Lesson 21) you may wish to read it again.

Conclude the lesson on England by reading several of the titles listed above.

Suggested Follow-Up Activities

BCP DRAFT HIST/GEOG 67

Kindergarten - History/Geography - Asia/Europe

Bibliography

Suggested Read Aloud Titles

*Anholt, Laurence. Camille and the Sunflowers: A Story About Vincent Van Gogh. New York: Barron's, 1994.

*Anno, Mitsumasa. All in a Day. New York: Philomel, 1986.

*________. Anno's Journey. New York: Philomel, 1977.

*Bailey, Donna & Anna Sproule. Where We Live: France. Austin, TX: Steck-Vaughn, 1991.

*Bemelmans, Ludwig. Madeline. New York: Viking, 1977.

*________. Madeline in London. New York: Puffin, 1977.

*Cobb, Vicki. This Place is Crowded: Japan. New York: Walker, 1992.

*de Paola, Tomie. Bonjour, Mr. Satie. New York: Putnam, 1991.

*Garland, Michael. Dinner at Magritte's New York: Dutton, 1995.

*Grosvenor, Donna. Pandas. Washington, D.C.: National Geographic, 1973.

*Morris, Ann. Bread, Bread, Bread. New York: Lothrop, Lee & Shepard, 1989.

*________. Hats, Hats, Hats. New York: Lothrop, Lee & Shepard, 1989.

*________. Shoes, Shoes, Shoes. New York: Lothrop, Lee & Shepard, 1995.

*Taylor, Barbara. The Animals Atlas. New York: Knopf, 1992.

*Wood, Audrey. King Bidgood's in the Bathtub. San Diego: Harcourt, 1985.

Suggested Reference Titles

*Bibbings, Susan and Gillian Wrobel. Looking at Lands: France. London: Macdonald, 1980.

*Haskins, Jim. Count Your Way Through China. Minneapolis: Carolrhoda, 1987.

*________. Count Your Way Through Japan. Minneapolis: Carolrhoda, 1987

*Jacobsen, Peter Otto & Preben Sejer Kristensen. A Family in France. New York: Bookwright Press, 1984.

*Kalman, Bobbie. China: The Land. New York: Crabtree Publishing, 1989.

*________. China: The People. New York: Crabtree Publishing, 1989.

*________ . Japan: The Land. New York: Crabtree Publishing, 1989.

*________ . Japan: The People. New York: Crabtree Publishing, 1989.

*Munro, Roxie. The Inside-Outside Book of London. New York: Dutton, 1989.

*Penny, Malcolm. Looking at Lands: Great Britain. London: Macdonald, 1981.

*St. John, Jetty. A Family in England. Minneapolis: Lerner, 1988.

*Tolan, Sally and Rhoda Sherwood. Children of the World: China. Milwaukee: Gareth Stevens, 1988.

*indicates annotation in a lesson