BCP DRAFT MUSIC 28

Kindergarten -Music - Lesson 18 - "March of the Siamese Children"

Objectives

Listen to a recording of "March of the Siamese Children" (from The King and I) by Richard Rodgers.

Respond to the music through movement.

Materials

A classroom size world map

Suggested Recordings

Rodgers & Hammerstein's The King and I. New Broadway Cast Recording. Varese Sarabande VSD-5763.

Richard Rodgers & Oscar Hammerstein, Songbook for Orchestra (Orchestral Suites). Cincinnati Pops Orchestra. Telarc CD-80278.

Suggested Video

The King and I. CBS/Fox Video. Farmington Hills, Michigan, 1984.

Deborah Kerr and Yul Brynner, 133 minutes.

Teacher Note

This lesson should be taught following History/Geography Lesson 23. The children need to be familiar with the continent of Asia prior to this lesson.

Procedure

Review the continent of Asia from History/Geography Lessons 21-23. Ask: What is the name of the largest continent in the world? Can you name some of the countries of Asia? What are some of the things you remember about China and Japan? (Allow children to recall information previously covered.)

Say: Today we are going to listen to a piece of music called "March of the Siamese Children." Point to the map and locate Thailand. Say: The name of this country is Thailand. It is a country in Asia. (Note its proximity to China and Japan.) The country of Thailand used to be called Siam. The people who live in this country used to be called Siamese. The music "March of the Siamese Children" then, is a piece of music about the children of Siam.

Say: This music is from a very famous musical program called The King and I. It is a movie about a woman from England who traveled to the country of Siam to be the schoolteacher for the King of Siam's children (Locate England on the map). The schoolteacher is introduced to the king's children as this music is playing. (If you have access to the video The King and I, fast forward to the section where the children are presented to Anna. Your class will enjoy this section of the movie. Be sure to note the costumes of the children and the king and the custom of bowing to the king. Compare and contrast the women's clothing.)

If you do not have access to the video, play a recording of the "March of the Siamese Children."

Ask: Do you remember the music we listened to called "March of the Toys?" (December Music Lesson) How are these two pieces of music alike? (Guide children to note the steady beat of both pieces of music. Help the children to conclude that a march is a piece of music with a

BCP DRAFT MUSIC 29

Kindergarten - Music - Lesson 18 - "March of the Siamese Children"

strong steady beat.) Play the music again and help children feel the strong beat. Assist children in clapping the beat.

Allow children to move creatively to the music. They may enjoy reenacting the scene from the video, or perhaps create a new march scene.

Suggested Follow-Up Activity

See the March Craft Lesson on Japanese fans to continue the study of Asia.

BCP DRAFT MUSIC 30

Kindergarten - Music - Lesson 19 - Go In and Out the Window

Objectives

Coordinate words with actions.

Follow oral directions.

Develop spatial awareness.

Materials

Text to the song (printed below)

A chair for each child

Procedure

Arrange the children's chairs in a circle. Leave enough space between each chair for the children to pass through. These spaces will be the "windows."

Teach children the verse Go In and Out the Window.

 

Go In and Out the Window

Go in and out the window,

Go in and out the window,

Go in and out the window

As we have done before.

[You may also hear the last line as "As fast as you can go."]

 

Tell the children they will sing the song again as they move through the circle of chairs. Explain that the spaces between the chairs are the "windows." When the children move into the circle of chairs, they are moving "in the window" and when they move out of the circle of chairs they are moving "out the window." Sing the song several times allowing children to thread in and out of the circle all in the same direction. (You may wish to be the leader of the line.)

Change the movement by adding a directional word to each line of the verse. Sing "Tiptoe in and out the window . . ." Allow children to think of other directional words to sing and act out. (march, stomp, skip, hop, etc.)

Suggested Follow-Up Activity

Continue the study of spatial awareness. Allow the children to demonstrate spatial words such as: over, under; through, between; next to, in front of, beside; above, below, etc.

Read Over, Under & Through by Tana Hoban (New York: Macmillan, 1973). In this book, photographs depict spatial words. Over-Under by Catherine Matthias (Chicago: Childrens Press, 1984) is also a good choice. A child's frolic in the park illustrates the meaning of: on, off; in, out; over, under; around, between; inside, outside; and above, below.

BCP DRAFT MUSIC 31

Kindergarten - Music - Lesson 20 - Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush

Objectives

Coordinate words with actions.

Follow oral directions.

Dramatize the song.

Materials

Text to the song (printed below)

A large playing space

Procedure

Say: We are going to sing a song called Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush. We will be singing about things that we do each day. Let's think about how we get started in the morning. Everyone pretend it is early in the morning and you are still sleeping in your bed. (Allow children time to visualize.)

Say: O.K.! It's morning! Time to wake-up!

Say: One of the first things I do after I wake up is wash my face. Ask: How many of you do that, too? Ask: Who can name something else that is usually done first thing in the morning? (Allow children to respond. Guide them to think about dressing, eating, brushing their teeth, walking to the bus stop, etc.)

Organize the children in a large circle. Instruct everyone to hold hands. Lead the children in a gentle skip around the circle. Sing the first verse of the song, encourage the children to join along.

Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush

Here we go round the mulberry bush,

The mulberry bush, the mulberry bush,

Here we go round the mulberry bush,

So early in the morning.

 

Stop the circle after this verse. Say: We wash our faces first thing in the morning, so let's sing and act that out. Encourage the children to act out washing their faces as they sing the next verse:

This is the way we wash our face,

Wash our face, wash our face,

This is the way we wash our face,

So early in the morning.

Instruct the children to gather hands again and circle round while you sing the first verse again.

Stop the circle, drop hands and sing and act out the next verse:

 

This is the way we brush our teeth . . .

 

Continue the song, sing and skip the first verse after each dramatization. Encourage the children to suggest other verses to sing depicting their morning routines.

BCP DRAFT MUSIC 31

Kindergarten - Music - Lesson 20 - Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush

Objectives

Coordinate words with actions.

Follow oral directions.

Dramatize the song.

Materials

Text to the song (printed below)

A large playing space

Procedure

Say: We are going to sing a song called Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush. We will be singing about things that we do each day. Let's think about how we get started in the morning. Everyone pretend it is early in the morning and you are still sleeping in your bed. (Allow children time to visualize.)

Say: O.K.! It's morning! Time to wake-up!

Say: One of the first things I do after I wake up is wash my face. Ask: How many of you do that, too? Ask: Who can name something else that is usually done first thing in the morning? (Allow children to respond. Guide them to think about dressing, eating, brushing their teeth, walking to the bus stop, etc.)

Organize the children in a large circle. Instruct everyone to hold hands. Lead the children in a gentle skip around the circle. Sing the first verse of the song, encourage the children to join along.

Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush

Here we go round the mulberry bush,

The mulberry bush, the mulberry bush,

Here we go round the mulberry bush,

So early in the morning.

 

Stop the circle after this verse. Say: We wash our faces first thing in the morning, so let's sing and act that out. Encourage the children to act out washing their faces as they sing the next verse:

This is the way we wash our face,

Wash our face, wash our face,

This is the way we wash our face,

So early in the morning.

Instruct the children to gather hands again and circle round while you sing the first verse again.

Stop the circle, drop hands and sing and act out the next verse:

 

This is the way we brush our teeth . . .

 

Continue the song, sing and skip the first verse after each dramatization. Encourage the children to suggest other verses to sing depicting their morning routines.