BCP DRAFT LIT 33



Baltimore Curriculum Project Draft Lessons

Introductory Notes

These lessons generally follow the grade-by-grade topics in the Core Knowledge Sequence, but they have been developed independent of the Core Knowledge Foundation. While the Core Knowledge Foundation encourages the development and sharing of lessons based on the Core Knowledge Sequence, it does not endorse any one set of lesson plans as the best or only way that the knowledge in the Sequence should be taught.

You may feel free to download and distribute these lessons, but please note that they are currently in DRAFT form. At this time the draft lessons on this web site do NOT have accompanying graphics, such as maps or cut-out patterns. Graphics will be added to this site later.

In participating BCP schools, these lessons are used in conjunction with the Direct Instruction skills programs in reading, language, and math. If you use or adapt these lessons, keep in mind that they are meant to address content and the application of skills. You will need to use other materials to ensure that children master skills in reading, language, and math.

Kindergarten - Literature - November - Overview

The literature lessons for November will again contain two sayings and phrases. It is suggested that previous sayings and phrases be review and reexamined. The poetry section will continue to expose children to the nursery rhymes of Mother Goose. Please refer to page 23 October Literature Overview for suggested titles of Mother Goose Rhymes.

The folktales for November are Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs and The Story of Jumping Mouse. We have included two extra lessons in the literature section this month to go along with the Native American tale The Story of Jumping Mouse. This selection is a Northern Plains legend. Therefore, the added lessons will examine the culture of the Sioux Indians. These lessons will be more history based than literature based and will be used as knowledge building lessons prior to the reading of the legend. It is hoped that the Native American lessons will naturally integrate into the Thanksgiving lessons that are being taught this month in American Civilization.

BCP DRAFT LIT 34

Kindergarten - Literature - Sayings and Phrases

Objectives

Develop new vocabulary through listening.

Listen to comprehend and to obtain information.

Procedure

The sayings for the month of November continue to assist in building character. It is suggested that the sayings and phrases from September and October also be reexamined. Those sayings were A place for everything and everything in its place, Do unto others as you would have them do unto you, Where there's a will, there's a way, and Practice makes perfect.

Great oaks from little acorns grow

Discuss with children what an acorn is and what it looks like. Bring one in to show the children or draw one on the board for them. Explain that the acorn is the seed or fruit of the oak tree. Continue to explain that the acorn seed when planted will grow into the oak tree. Say: This saying means that, just as a small acorn can grow into a great big oak tree, something that starts out small or not very important can turn out big or very important. Say: Abraham Lincoln was born in a log cabin and read books by firelight. Even though his family was poor, he became one of the greatest presidents of the United States. His life is true to the saying "Great oaks from little acorns grow." (From What Your Kindergartner Needs to Know, E.D. Hirsch, Jr. and John Holdren). To illustrate the lesson further, conduct a science lesson on plant growth. Obtain seeds that grow rapidly to plant and care for with the children. Marigold, sunflower, and rye grass seeds are all rapid growers. Allow children to examine the small seed that you have obtained. Discuss how it is like an acorn seed and when planted it will grow into a bigger plant. Provide containers of soil for each student to plant his seed in. Water and place the container in a sunny location. In just a few days the suggested seeds will sprout. Children can monitor the growth of their plant on a daily basis. Continue to reinforce the saying Great oaks from little acorns grow as it applies to the growth of the students' plants.

Look before you leap

Define the word leap for the children. Say: The word leap means to jump, usually over something or across something. To illustrate the word leap further, ask if any of the children know the game leapfrog. Discuss how in the game the players leap over the backs of the other players as a frog would leap over lily pads in a pond. Invite the children to play a quick round of leapfrog. Say: This saying means that you should be careful and think before you rush into doing something. Read the following story from What Your Kindergartner Needs to Know.

"Mom!" said Andrew with excitement. "Ben says he'll trade me all his toy cars for my bike! Isn't that great?"

"I don't know, Andrew, is it?" asked his mother. "You ride your bike every day, and a bike costs a lot more money than toy cars. Do you really want to trade? You'd better look before you leap."

Discuss the story with your students. Allow time for further examples of the saying through personal anecdotes they may be able to recall. Reinforce that the saying look before you leap means we should know what we are getting into before we act.

BCP DRAFT LIT 35

Kindergarten - Literature - Sayings and Phrases

Suggested Follow-Up

Allow children to illustrate the two sayings introduced today by depicting examples of the sayings as they apply to everyday life. For example they may illustrate the story of the boy in the teaching of look before you leap or one of the situations they recalled during the discussion. They may illustrate the saying Great oaks from little acorns grow by depicting the science experiment they have started.BCP DRAFT LIT 36

Kindergarten - Literature - Nursery Rhymes

Objectives

Attend to the reading of the nursery rhymes.

Listen for action words and act out the action.

Develop oral vocabulary through repetitive readings of the nursery rhyme.

Materials

Jack and Jill flip book worksheet - one per student

Procedure

Read the following nursery rhymes with the children several times. Develop any new vocabulary that may be unknown to the children. Invite them to join in with the readings as they gain familiarity with the verses.

Jack Be Nimble

Jack be nimble,

Jack be quick,

Jack jump over

The candlestick.

Read the verse several times with the children. Discuss the meaning of the word nimble. Say: If Jack was slow or clumsy he would not have been able to jump over a candle stick. Jack was nimble; that means he was fast and light. He did not have any problem jumping over things. Ask: What action does Jack do in this rhyme? (He jumps.) Clarify that jump is an action. It is something that you can do. Provide other examples of action words, such as run, hop, sing . . . Stress that an action is something that you can do. Reread the rhyme and tell children to listen for the action word. Have children act out the rhyme by jumping over an imaginary candlestick while saying the rhyme.

Jack Sprat

Jack Sprat could eat no fat,

His wife could eat no lean,

And so between the two of them

They licked the platter clean.

Discuss how the words fat and lean refer to meat. Provide a visual example of a piece of meat cut from a magazine if possible so children can see the portion of the meat that is fat and the portion that is lean. Reread the verse several times. Ask: What is the action that Jack and his wife do in this rhyme? (They eat. They lick the platter clean.) Say: Remember the action is something that you can do. Do you eat? Could you lick a platter? (yes) Then that is the action. Have children act out the action as they recite the verse again.





BCP DRAFT LIT 37

Kindergarten - Literature - Nursery Rhymes

 

Jack and Jill

Jack and Jill went up the hill

To fetch a pail of water;

Jack fell down and broke his crown,

And Jill came tumbling after.

Discuss the meaning of the word crown as it applies to this rhyme. Say: The word crown may make you think of a fancy object that kings and queens wear on their heads. Listen again to the rhyme and think about Jack. Do you think he is a king? Read the verse again, and clarify that Jack is not a king; he is just a little boy. Ask: What do you think they mean when they say Jack fell down and broke his crown if he is not a king? Allow children to speculate. Clarify that in this rhyme, crown means head. Repeat the verse several times inviting children to join in. Assist children in creating the flip book on the following page. Draw the children's attention to the illustration of Jack holding his head p.7. Review crown means head.

Directions for Jack and Jill flip book: Provide one sheet for each student. Cut the paper along the solid lines and stack the pages in numerical order. Staple the upper left corner. Hold the book in the left hand and flip the pages with the right to see the characters "move."

BCP DRAFT LIT 38

Kindergarten - Literature - Nursery Rhymes

Objectives

Attend to the reading of the nursery rhyme.

Predict missing words in the rhyme There Was an Old Woman.

Develop oral vocabulary through repetitive readings of the nursery rhyme.

Procedure

Read the following nursery rhymes with the children several times. Develop any new vocabulary that may be unknown to the children. Invite them to join in with the readings as they gain familiarity with the verses.

There Was a Little Girl

There was a little girl

Who had a little curl

Right in the middle of her forehead;

When she was good, she was very, very good,

And when she was bad, she was horrid.

 

Discuss the word horrid. Ask: What do you think the word horrid means when you listen to this sentence And when she was bad, she was horrid. Children should deduce that horrid means very bad. Allow children to speculate things that the little girl in the rhyme did that might have been very, very good and things that might have been horrid.

Say: Listen carefully to the next poem I'm going to read. I will leave out some words. I want you to see if you can tell what the missing word should be. Listen carefully.

Read the poem omitting the key words. Provide time for children to guess the missing word. Check the guesses by reading the poem with the word provided by the student. Ask children to check if the guess makes sense and if it rhymes with the other words.

There Was an Old Woman Who Lived in a Shoe

There was an old woman who lived in a shoe,

She had so many children she didn't know what to ______;(do)

She gave them some broth without any bread;

And spanked them all soundly and put them to _______.(bed)

Say: I have one more poem I want to share with you today. Be good listeners as I read this poem.

 

Happy Thought

by Robert Louis Stevenson

The world is so full

of a number of things,

I'm sure we should all

be as happy as kings.

BCP DRAFT LIT 39

Kindergarten - Literature - Nursery Rhymes

Discuss the poem with the children. Read it again and ask children to think about things that make them happy. Allow time for oral vocabulary development by calling on children to talk about the things that make them happy. Provide the children with drawing paper and allow them to illustrate the things that make them happy.

BCP DRAFT LIT 40

Kindergarten - Literature - Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs

Objectives

Attend to the oral reading of the story.

Use oral language to relate Snow White's experiences.

Participate in character mapping activity.

Recite the repetitive phrase, Mirror, Mirror on the wall, who is fairest of us all?

Participate in an art activity. (patterns on following page)

Suggested Titles

Grimm, Brothers. Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, translated by Randall Jarrell. New York:

Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 1972.

Grimm, Brothers. Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, translated and adapted by Anthea Bell.

Natick, MA: Picture Book Studio USA, 1985.

Poole, Josephine, retold by. Snow White. New York: Knopf, 1991.

Materials

Your favorite version of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs

Tagboard

Mirror Patterns

Aluminum foil

Crayons or markers

Procedure

Show children the cover of the book you will be reading aloud to them. Tell them the name of the book is Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. Some of the students may be familiar with the story or the Disney video. Allow children to share that they may have already heard this story, but don't allow them to tell what the story is about as there may be others in the class who have not heard the story before.

You will read the story aloud to the class. Stop frequently in the reading and ask children to predict what they think will happen next. Allow them to fill in missing words as you read repetitive phrases in the story. When appropriate, point out meaningful words or pictures in the book as you read. You will also need to discuss unusual vocabulary words as they appear in the text. The most obvious in this story is the term fairest in the repetitive phrase the stepmother asks the mirror. Clarify for the children that the stepmother is asking the mirror who the most beautiful person in the kingdom is when she asks Mirror, mirror on the wall, who is fairest of us all? As you read the phrase in the text of the story, call upon the children to help you think of another way the stepmother might ask that question. Lead the children to such suggestions as: Mirror, mirror on the wall, who is the prettiest person in town? Continue rephrasing the question until all children are clear on the meaning of the phrase as it appears in the story.

At the conclusion of the reading of the story, lead the children in a discussion of Snow White's experiences. Sample questions might be:

*What did Snow White look like? (skin as white as snow, lips as red as blood)

*Would you want to be friends with Snow White's stepmother? Why or Why not? (Snow White's stepmother would not make a good friend because she is only concerned about herself. She does not act in a very kind way.)

BCP DRAFT LIT 41

Kindergarten - Literature - Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs

*Can you think of a place in the story where Snow White's stepmother acted in a selfish, mean way? (when she tried to hurt Snow White)

*Would you want to be friends with Snow White? Why or Why not? (Snow White would make a good friend because she treats people with kindness. She is a nice person.)

*Can you name a place in the story where Snow White acted in a kind way? (She was always helpful and pleasant toward the seven dwarfs.)

*How did the Queen react when the mirror told her Snow White was more beautiful? (She was angry.)

*What did the Queen decide to do so the mirror would tell her she was the fairest of all? (The Queen decided to have Snow White killed.)

* Did the huntsman that took Snow White to the wood kill her? (no) Why not? (because he took pity on Snow White and told her to run away and that he would tell the Queen she was dead)

*What kind of a person do you think the huntsman might have been? (He was brave. He did what was right when he allowed Snow White to run away from the Queen even though he had been ordered to kill her.)

*Why did the dwarfs warn Snow White not to let anyone in the house? (They were afraid the Queen would find her and kill her.)

*How did the Queen know that Snow White was still alive and that the huntsman had not killed her? (She asked her mirror who the fairest of all was, and it said Snow White was and that she was living in the woods with the dwarfs.)

*Describe the different ways the Queen tried to kill Snow White. (strangle her with the lace, poison comb, poisonous apple) NOTE: These answers may differ from the version you have read to the class.

*Why do you think the prince wanted Snow White's coffin? (He thought she was beautiful. He could tell just by looking at her that she was a kind and good person.)

*How was Snow White saved from the poisonous apple? (The dwarfs gave Snow White's coffin to the prince that begged to have it. As his servants carried it down from the mountain they stumbled and shook the apple from Snow White's throat.)

 

Following the discussion of the story, lead the children in a character mapping activity. Draw a chart on the chalkboard similar to the following example. Have the children assist you in completing the chart with the characters' attributes. Compare the personalities of the characters in the story.

Instruct the children to create their own mirrors by tracing the mirror pattern onto tagboard. Allow time to decorate the mirror frame with crayons and markers. Create the "mirror" by covering a tagboard square with aluminum foil pressed as free of wrinkles as possible. Glue the aluminum square onto the decorated tagboard frame. Have children join in reciting the phrase Mirror, mirror on the wall, who is fairest of us all?

Suggested Follow-Up Activity

You may wish to supplement the story with a viewing of the film of the Walt Disney version. Discussions comparing and contrasting the story to the film should follow the viewing. You may wish to use the character mapping activity again; this time fill in the attributes of the seven dwarfs as their characters are developed in the film version.

BCP DRAFT LIT 42b

Kindergarten - Literature - Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs

Copy the Character Map on the chalkboard and complete it by brainstorming with the children.



CHARACTER MAP

BCP DRAFT LIT 42c

Kindergarten - Literature - Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs

Directions for Snow White mirrors:

Make several patterns of the mirror on tagboard A.

Give each student a piece of tagboard.

Direct the children to trace the mirror shape on their tagboard and then cut it out.

Allow time to decorate the mirror frame with crayons or markers.

Give each student another square of tagboard and a piece of aluminum foil B.

Cover the square with the foil, smooth it of as many wrinkles as possible.

Glue the foil covered square onto the mirror frame.

Practice reciting Mirror, Mirror on the wall, who is fairest of us all?

BCP DRAFT LIT/HIST 43

Kindergarten - Literature/History - The Story of Jumping Mouse/Culture of the Sioux 1

Objectives

Recall that Christopher Columbus was an explorer who came to America.

Identify American Indians as the first people to live in the United States.

Understand that the first Americans lived in many groups, in different places, with varying lifestyles.

Review resources as things from nature that people use.

Suggested Titles

Blood, Charles. American Indian Games and Crafts. New York: Franklin Watts, 1981.

McGovern, Ann. . . .If You Lived With the Sioux Indians. New York: Scholastic, 1972.

Osinski, Alice. A New True Book The Sioux. Chicago: Childrens Press, 1984.

Shemie, Bonnie. Houses of Hide and Earth. Plattsburgh, N.Y.: Tundra Books, 1991.

Materials

American Indian Groups Map (follows this lesson)

Procedure

Prompt the children to recall information previously learned in September regarding Christopher Columbus and his journey to America. Clarify for the children that when Columbus discovered America, he thought he had reached a country called India, so he called the people Indians. In fact, they were the original Americans. Tell the children that today many of their descendants prefer to be called Native Americans. A native is an original inhabitant of a place.

Help the students to picture our country long ago. Tell them to imagine a large place without stores, tall buildings, highways, or airplanes. Show the students a map of the United States that shows the places where some American Indians once lived. (A map follows this lesson. You may wish to enlarge the map or create an overhead transparency of it.) Tell the children that American Indians were the first people to live in this country. They lived in special groups called tribes. Most tribes lived in small communities. Be sure children understand that not all tribes were the same. They had different names and different ways of doing things. Refer to the map and draw attention to the different types of homes each tribe built. If you have access to books showing the different types of clothing the different tribes wore, share it with the children and continue to discuss how each tribe had different ways of doing things.

Review the term resources from Science Lesson 14. Recall that resources are things from nature that people use. Tell the children that Indian tribes used the natural resources around them to create their homes and clothing. Refer to the map again and ask children if they can tell what resources were available for the different tribes by looking at what they used to build their homes. Be sure children note the Sioux lived in tepees made of buffalo hides, the Iroquois built longhouses made from wood poles covered with elm-tree bark, the Wampanoag built Wigwams by covering poles with grass and bark, the Pueblo covered poles with hard packed earth, and the Nootka lived in plank houses made from wood. (Note the totem pole entrance.) Explain to children that although each Indian group was different, they all shared a respect for nature

because they depended on nature to meet their needs for food, clothing, and shelter. You may wish to review lessons learned during science regarding conservation.

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Kindergarten - Literature/History - The Story of Jumping Mouse/ Culture of the Sioux 1

Conclude the lesson by reviewing the information you have presented through questioning and clarification. Provide time for the children to get up and move around following this lesson by teaching them an American Indian dance. Tell children that American Indians danced for many reasons. Some danced to the sun, some danced to the rain, some to a good harvest, some to make people who were sick get well, and some danced just for fun!

Toe-Heel Dance

Demonstrate the dance before the students begin.

1. Form a circle. Dancers move counterclockwise. Start with the left foot first.

2. Loudly say "one." As you say "one," put your left toe down.

3. Softly say "two" and put your left heel down.

4. Step forward with your right foot. Loudly say "one" and put your right toe down.

5. Softly say "two" and put your right heel down.

6. Repeat steps 2 through 5. When everyone can do this, dance to the beat of a drum. Instead of counting out loud, the drummer will beat the drum loudly for "one" and softly for "two."

Rain Dance

1. Students stand in a circle. Everyone must be still and quiet.

2. The teacher begins by rubbing her thumb and two fingers back and forth to make the "mist."

3. She turns toward the student on her right, who begins rubbing his thumb and two fingers.

4. Each person "passes the mist" until all children are making the mist.

5. The teacher then changes her motion to rubbing her palms back and forth. She "passes the drizzle" to the student on her right and so on until all children are making drizzle.

6. The process continues with "rain"-- patting thighs; "downpour" -- stomping feet.

7. To end the storm, the process is reversed until the leader is making the mist alone.

(Add rhythms with instruments if available.)

BCP DRAFT LIT/HIST 45

Kindergarten - Literature/History - The Story of Jumping Mouse/Culture of the Sioux 2

Objectives

Recall that American Indians were the first people to live in the United States.

Identify the Sioux as a tribe that lived on the plains.

Recognize that the Sioux used the natural resources around them to meet their needs.

Gain information regarding the culture of the Sioux.

Suggested Titles

Refer to previous lesson

Materials

Pictograph sheet

Indian puppet costumes

American Indian Groups map from the previous lesson

Procedure

Review knowledge gained from previous lesson regarding American Indians as first people to live in United States and differences in tribes by conducting a discussion with the children.

Refer to the American Indian Groups map from the previous lesson. Point out the Sioux on the map. Identify the region as the plains. Say: The Sioux lived on the plains. Ask: Where did the Sioux live? (on the plains). Ask: What kind of home did the Sioux live in (tepees.) Say: Today we are going to learn more about just this one Indian group. Remember that each tribe lived in different ways so the things we learn about the Sioux may not be the same for all the other Indian tribes. (If possible, you should read one of the books listed in the previous lesson` that gives specific information about the Sioux to the children. If You Lived With the Sioux Indians, by Ann McGovern is an excellent choice.)

(If you do not have access to a book about the Sioux, the following information may be presented to the children in a storytelling fashion.) The Sioux lived in what is now North Dakota and South Dakota; Dakota was another name for the Sioux tribe. Most Sioux Indians were tall and thin. The color of their skin went from very light to deep brown. Everyone young and old wore their hair long. It was dark and thick and came down to their shoulders. Sometimes they would braid it, sometimes they wore it loose.

They lived in a tent, called a tepee, that was made of tall wooden poles covered with buffalo hides. The hides were so tough that they lasted for many years--through winter and summer weather. Ask the children why it would be necessary for the tepees to last for many years (so they wouldn't have to keep making new ones).

The Sioux had to keep on the move to hunt the buffalo that roamed the plain. When they traveled they took everything they had with them. The women were in charge of the tepees. They took them down when it was time to move, and when the tribe set up camp again, the women put the tepees back up. Ask the children if they know what a buffalo looks like, provide pictures if possible. Explain that the buffalo travel in herds. Define that a herd is a large group of animals roaming and hunting food together.

Buffalo meat was the main food for the Sioux, but they also ate deer, bear, antelope, and BCP DRAFT LIT/HIST 46

Kindergarten - Literature/History - The Story of Jumping Mouse/Culture of the Sioux 2

sometimes wild turkeys and hens. They rarely ate fish and didn't like to eat rabbit or squirrel. Sometimes they ate fruits, but they did not plant gardens. Ask the children if they can guess why the Sioux did not plant gardens (because they were always on the move following the buffalo). If someone in the tribe did not have enough food, he did not go hungry, because food was shared by all.

Clothes were made from animal skins, mostly deerskins. Women and girls wore long dresses and leggings. Men wore loose deerskin shirts and tight leggings in the winter and breechcloth and a pair of moccasins in the summer. Boys did not wear any clothing in warm weather until they were eight years old. Buffalo robes were worn in the winter by everyone. They were worn with the fur side inside. Winter moccasins would be lined with fur, too. Ask the children why the robes and moccasins were worn with the fur on the inside (for the extra warmth).

Conclude the study of the Sioux culture by reinforcing that the Sioux used the natural resources around them to provide food, clothing and shelter for their families. Buffalo was the main resource of the Sioux. They used nearly every part of it. They ate buffalo, used the skin to make their clothing and tepees, and even the horns were used as spoons.

Suggested Follow-Up Activities

1. Discuss the use of pictographs as a way of telling stories. Allow children time to color the pictograph sheet that follows this lesson. Read the words of the different pictographs to the children.

2. Make individual tepees for the children to take home.

Materials

Light brown drawing paper

Scissors

Crayons or markers

Stapler

Directions

1. Cut a half circle from the brown paper.

2. Draw designs on the paper (see illustration for ideas).

3. Roll the paper into a cone. Staple in place. Cut a slit in the tepee and lift the flap to make a door.





















BCP DRAFT LIT/HIST 47

Kindergarten - Literature/History - The Story of Jumping Mouse/Culture of the Sioux 2

3. Make Indian puppets. Each child needs one man and one woman costume (see below) and two plastic spoons. The costume is colored and cut out and glued to a plastic spoon. The bowl of the spoon is decorated with a face.

BCP DRAFT LIT/HIST 48

Kindergarten - Literature/History - The Story of Jumping Mouse/Culture of the Sioux 3

Objectives

Recall information learned about the Sioux culture.

Attend to the oral reading of The Story of Jumping Mouse.

Use oral language to relate Jumping Mouse's experiences.

Develop new vocabulary through listening.

Create a mouse to use in dramatizing the story.

Suggested Titles

Steptoe, John. The Story of Jumping Mouse. New York: Lothrop, Lee & Shepard, 1984.

If you are unable to locate the book, it is told in its entirety in What Your Kindergartner Needs to Know, E.D. Hirsch, Jr., and John Holdren.

Van Laan, Nancy. In a Circle Long Ago, A Treasury of Native Lore From North America. New York: Apple Soup Books, 1995.

Materials

A toilet paper tube for each student

Gray construction paper

Mouse patterns (following page)

Procedure

Review the culture of the Sioux Indians from previous lessons. Say: Today I would like to read to you a Native American legend of the Northern Plains people. Listen carefully to the story. Read orally The Story of Jumping Mouse. After reading invite students to participate in a discussion about Jumping Mouse's adventures. Prompt the discussion to include as many children as possible to develop oral language. Suggested discussion questions:

*Where did the young mouse want to go? (to the far-off land)

*How did Magic Frog help the mouse cross the river? (He named him Jumping Mouse which gave him the power to jump across the river.)

*Why was the bison dying? (He drank from a poisoned stream, and it blinded him so he couldn't find food to eat.)

*How did Jumping Mouse help the bison? (He named the bison Eyes-of-a-Mouse. Jumping Mouse gave his own vision to the bison.)

*How did the bison help Jumping Mouse? (He guided Jumping Mouse to the mountains.)

*Why was the wolf going to die? (He lost his sense of smell because he was a proud and lazy creature. He would not be able to sniff out his food.)

*How did Jumping Mouse help the wolf? (He named the wolf Nose-of-a-Mouse. Jumping Mouse gave his own sense of smell to the wolf.)

*How did the wolf help Jumping Mouse? (He guided Jumping Mouse through the mountains to the far-off land.)

*Who did Jumping Mouse meet again at the far-off land? (Magic Frog)

*Why was Jumping Mouse sad? (He reached the far-off land but could not see it or smell it and feared he would not be able to survive.)

BCP DRAFT LIT/HIST 49

Kindergarten - Literature/History - The Story of Jumping Mouse/Culture of the Sioux 3

*How did Magic Frog help Jumping Mouse? (He told Jumping Mouse to use his magic legs and jump as high as he could. He changed into a new creature and he could see and smell again.)

*What was the new name Magic Frog gave to Jumping Mouse? (He named him Eagle. Magic Frog told him he would live in the far-off land forever.)

*Why do you think Magic Frog helped Jumping Mouse? (because he had an unselfish spirit and was willing to help others)

*What lesson can we learn from Jumping Mouse? (to be kind and helpful to others; to follow our dreams in unselfish ways)

Assist the children in creating a mouse puppet (directions below, pattern on following page). Have students dramatize the story as you reread it.

Suggested Follow Up Activities

Complete any of the other suggested activities from the previous Lit/Hist lessons that you may not yet have done.

Read other Native American legends to your children. In a Circle Long Ago, A Treasury of Native Lore From North America, by Nancy Van Laan, New York: Apple Soup Books, 1995., is an excellent choice. The stories are short and beautifully illustrated.



Directions for Jumping Mouse Puppet

1. Cover a toilet paper tube with gray construction paper.

2. Provide each student with a copy of the mouse parts.

3. Allow children time to color the mouse parts.

4. Cut out the mouse body and glue the parts on the tube.

5. Children dramatize the adventure of Jumping Mouse while you reread the story.





BCP DRAFT LIT/HIST 49a

Kindergarten - Literature/History - The Story of Jumping Mouse/Culture of the Sioux 3



BCP DRAFT LIT/HIST 47a

Kindergarten - Literature/History - The Story of Jumping Mouse/Culture of the Sioux 2

Name__________________________________________________________

Native Americans long ago used pictures instead of words to tell stories. These are called pictographs. Color the pictographs. Use them to tell stories.