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Baltimore Curriculum Project Draft Lessons

Introductory Notes

These lessons generally follow the grade-by-grade topics in the Core Knowledge Sequence, but they have been developed independent of the Core Knowledge Foundation. While the Core Knowledge Foundation encourages the development and sharing of lessons based on the Core Knowledge Sequence, it does not endorse any one set of lesson plans as the best or only way that the knowledge in the Sequence should be taught.

You may feel free to download and distribute these lessons, but please note that they are currently in DRAFT form. At this time the draft lessons on this web site do NOT have accompanying graphics, such as maps or cut-out patterns. Graphics will be added to this site later.

In participating BCP schools, these lessons are used in conjunction with the Direct Instruction skills programs in reading, language, and math. If you use or adapt these lessons, keep in mind that they are meant to address content and the application of skills. You will need to use other materials to ensure that children master skills in reading, language, and math.

Kindergarten - November Science - Overview

November science lessons are centered around taking care of the earth. Students will gain an understanding of how living things depend upon the environment to find the things they need to live. They will identify ways to conserve and protect our natural resources. There are many ways these lessons can be expanded upon. Guest speakers and field trips to recycling centers or landfills could compliment the following lessons.

Suggested Books

Bailey, Donna. What We Can Do About Litter. New York: Watts, 1991.

Brown, Ruth. The World That Jack Built. New York: Dutton, 1991.

dePaola, Tomie. Michael Bird-Boy. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1975.

Gibbons, Gail. Recycle! A Handbook for Kids. Boston: Little, Brown, 1992.

Lakin, Patricia. Jet Black Pickup Truck. New York: Orchard, 1990.

Leedy, Loreen. The Great Trash Bash. New York: Holiday, 1991.

Madden, Don. The Wartville Wizard. New York: Macmillan, 1986.

Tusa, Tricia. Stay Away From the Junkyard. New York: Macmillan, 1988.

Van Allsburg, Chris. Just a Dream. Boston: Houghton, 1990.

Van Blaricam, Colleen. Crafts from Recyclables. Boyds Mill/Bell Books, 1992.

Wilkes, Angela. My First Green Book. New York: Knopf, 1991.

Zion, Gene. Dear Garbage Man. New York: HarperCollins, 1957.

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Kindergarten - Science Lesson 12 - Conservation

Objectives

Review that all people, plants, and animals live on Earth. (Geography Lesson 1)

Classify objects found in the environment as living or nonliving.

Materials

Crayons

Scissors

Drawing paper

Procedure

Review Geography Lesson One by asking: Who can name something that lives on Earth? Allow children to respond with a variety of answers. Be sure all children recall that all plants, people, and animals live on Earth.

Give each child one piece of drawing paper. Assist them in folding their paper into fourths. Tell them you are going for a walk around the school grounds. When they return to the classroom, they will draw four different pictures of things they saw on the walk. (Plan the walk ahead of time to ensure the route you take has a variety of things for students to see.) Take the walk around the school reminding children to be thinking of the things they will draw when they return to the room. Following the walk, allow children time to draw their pictures. Assist children with labeling their pictures if desired. When all children have completed their drawings, direct them to cut the pictures apart on the folded lines so they will each have four separate pictures.

Work with the children to classify the pictures in different groups. Have the students suggest ways to group the pictures. For example, possible groups might be all plants, all the trees, all the rocks, all the people, and so on. Discuss with the children until the pictures are grouped into living things and nonliving things. Decide with children how they can tell if something is living or nonliving. Possible answers might be, living things grow, nonliving things do not grow. Living things need food. Nonliving things do not need food. If students incorrectly classify an object, question them as to whether the object needs air, water, and food to grow.

Give each child one clean sheet of drawing paper. Write living on the top of the paper. Have students draw one living thing they saw on their walk. Check students' drawings to be sure they are based on the characteristics of living things. Direct children to turn the paper over and write nonliving on the top of this side. Have students draw one nonliving thing they saw on their walk. Check students' drawings to be sure they are accurate. Question as to whether the object needs air, water, and food to grow.

Suggested Follow-Up

Play London Bridge with students, substituting this verse to the traditional melody:

Tell me something that is living

That is living, that is living.

Tell me something that is living,

Can you name it?

Have the student who is caught name something living before the others let him or her go. Repeat, asking students to alternately name living and nonliving things.

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Kindergarten - Science - Lesson 13 - Conservation

Objectives

Review objects as living or nonliving.

Communicate that living things need air, food, and water.

Materials

A picture from a magazine or a book that shows living and nonliving objects

A small mirror per groups of two

Magazines for children to cut from

Drawing paper

Scissors, Glue

Materials for experiment

A small piece of cardboard

Petroleum jelly

Procedure

Display the picture you have selected showing living and nonliving objects. Have children point to specific things illustrated and tell if they are living or nonliving. Encourage students to think about and compare the characteristics of the living and nonliving things in the picture.

Discuss that living things need air to breathe. Point out the chest area of the body. Encourage students to watch the chest area move as air goes into and out of the lungs. Put the children into groups of two. Direct children to watch their partner take a deep breath. Ask: What do you see? What do you hear? Direct one partner to breathe on a mirror. Ask: What do you see on the mirror? (They will observe condensed water vapor. More water vapor will condense on the mirrors if the mirrors are cold.)

Discuss the fact that in adition to air, living things need food and water. Ask: What are some ways that living things get food? (Possible answers: People grow food on farms, some animals eat smaller animals, some animals eat nuts or berries, butterflies eat nectar from flowers.) Ask: How do living things get water? (Most animals drink water or get it from the food they eat; most plants get water from the soil through their roots.)

Give each student one piece of drawing paper. Assist them in folding the paper in half. Direct the students to look for pictures in the magazines of living things eating food and living things drinking water. Glue the pictures of living things eating on one side of the paper, and the pictures of living things drinking water on the other side of the sheet. If magazines are not available, students can draw pictures of living things eating food and drinking water. Suggest that students can also look for some pictures that show living things using water in ways other than drinking.

Following the activity return the students' attention to the picture displayed at the beginning of the lesson. Have students identify which objects need air and which do not need air. Have students tell ways each living thing might get the food and water it needs.

Set up an experiment by putting petroleum jelly on a small piece of cardboard. Tell children that you are going to take a sample of the air by placing the cardboard outdoors overnight where it will not be disturbed. Tell them to remind you to check the cardboard tomorrow.

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Kindergarten - Science - Lesson 14 - Conservation

Objectives

Review: living things need air, food, and water.

Infer that living things get what they need to survive from the environment.

Classify personal and shared space.

Communicate how to take care of these spaces.

Materials

Cardboard experiment from previous lesson

Drawing paper

Crayons or finger paint

Procedure

Review with children the concept that living things need air, food, and water. Refer to Lesson 13 and ask children to recall pictures they cut from magazines showing living things eating and drinking water. Ask: Who remembers the experiment we started yesterday? Have students recall the cardboard with petroleum jelly on it. Ask: What did we want to take a sample of? (the air) Retrieve the cardboard square from outdoors and have students observe how it has changed. They will probably observe dust, dirt, and particles. Discuss how breathing air that isn't clean affects living things.

Ask the questions that begin to spark thinking regarding caring for the environment. Ask: If you have your own bedroom at home, who is responsible for keeping it clean? (Some may say that they help their parents keep it clean.) Ask: If you share a bedroom, who is responsible for keeping it clean? Who cleans what parts of the room? How do you decide? (Students may say they clean one side and their sister or brother cleans the other.) Ask: Who uses the kitchen and living room? Who keeps it clean? (Students may say that they use the kitchen and living room, but their parents clean up.) Ask: Who uses this classroom? Who should clean it up? (Children should begin to understand that they are responsible for cleaning the areas that they use.)

Lead a discussion on personal space and shared space. Say: When you are sitting in your chair you are in your space. When you work at the table, the area in front of you is your space. When you are at home, your house is the space of all those who live there. When you are at school, the playground area is the students' space. The street is shared space for everyone. Point out areas of shared space and personal space in the classroom. Lead the children in a game of Simon Says to enforce the concept of personal space and shared space. Give directions such as Simon says stand in your space. Simon says stand in your neighbor's space. Simon says put your foot in your shared space. Read the following poem to the children.

 

Part of This World

I'm glad to be part of this great big world,

So glad to be part of this world.

A fish in the stream, a cog in the wheel,

I'm glad to be part of this world.

 

You and I are parts of this great big world,

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Kindergarten - Science Lesson 14 - Conservation

 

Both of us parts of this world.

Special as snowflakes, bright as the sun,

We both are parts of this world.

We are all parts of this great big world,

All of us parts of the world.

Threads in a blanket, bricks in a wall,

All of us parts of this world.

We've got to share space in this great big world,

Got to share space in this world.

Move over a bit, make room for a friend,

We've got to share space in this world.

I've got to take care of this great big world,

Got to take care of this world.

We all can pitch in to keep the world clean,

We've got to take care of this world.

(poem taken from Macmillan/McGraw Hill text, Living and Growing)

Discuss the poem with the children, and draw attention to the fact that we share the space on Earth with all the other living things. Have children suggest ways to keep the world clean.

Brainstorm with the children to name spaces on Earth we share with living and nonliving things. (Responses might include a yard, the forest, a park, the beach, and so on.) Give each student a piece of drawing paper. Instruct the children to choose a space that they share with living and nonliving things. Tell them to draw or paint a picture of this space. Next, have the children cut out pictures of living and nonliving things that would share this space with them. When their pictures are dry or finished, have them glue the cut outs to their paper. Allow children to share the pictures they have created with the rest of the class. Ask children to describe their pictures and make suggestions on ways to keep the space they have illustrated clean for all the living things.

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Kindergarten - Science Lesson 15 - Conservation

Objectives

Understand that resources are things from nature that people use.

Identify objects that come from resources in nature.

Materials

A story book about taking care of the environment (See suggested titles from November Science Overview.)

Procedure

Explain to children that once our country's land had very few people living on it, and the land and water stayed very clean. Explain that today, with so many people living in our country, our land and water have changed. In some places the trees and grasses that once grew on the land have been destroyed, and the clean rivers and oceans have become dirty. Discuss the fact that it is every American's responsibility to help keep our land and water clean. Ask children to name some ways in which they can help keep our land and water clean and beautiful. (Possible answers include: avoid littering on land and water, recycle, plant trees and grasses, and so on.) Read the book you have selected from the suggested titles list on the November Science Overview. Discuss how the story relates to the theme of taking care of the earth.

Say: Listen to this word: resources. Say that word with me, everyone, resources. Say: Resources are things from nature that people use. Ask: What are resources? (things from nature that people use) Firm up definition. Say: I am going to read a riddle; you will name a resource when you answer the riddle. Listen to this riddle: I grow outside. People use me to build homes and buildings. I am also used to make paper and pencils that you use at school. What am I? (a tree) Say: Correct! Trees are used to build houses and some buildings. They are used to make paper and pencils. A tree is a resource because a tree comes from nature and people use it.

Say: Listen to the next riddle and guess the resource. Read: People, plants and animals need me every day. You use me for drinking, washing, and swimming. What am I? (water) Say: Correct! Water is used by all living things. We drink it, wash with it and swim in it. Water is a resource because it comes from nature and people use it.

Say: Listen to the next riddle. Read: I cover much of the earth. Plants have their roots in me. Dogs like to dig in me to hide their bones. Children like to dig in me, too! What am I? (dirt or soil) Say: That's right! Dirt is a resource. It comes from nature and is used by people.

Review each resource named from the riddles. Ask children to think of other ways in which people can use these resources. (Possible answers include: trees - furniture, paper products; water - cooking, watering plants; dirt (soil) - for gardening.) Explain to children that there are two other resources that we use every day. Tell them that they are resources that all of us need. Encourage children's guesses, helping them to ultimately name air and sunlight.

Ask children to look around the classroom and point out things that come from resources in nature. Help them to identify wooden and paper objects as coming from trees; some cloth objects from cotton plants; water as coming from lakes and rivers. If they name plastic or metal items, identify plastic as coming from oil and metal objects coming from ore in the ground.

Conclude the lesson by asking children to start thinking of ways to keep our resources safe so we can continue to use them. Accept all reasonable answers. Tell the children that during the next science lesson they will learn about ways to protect the resources of the earth.



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Kindergarten - Science Lesson 15 - Conservation

Read the following poem to the children.

Our World is a Special Place

 

Our world is a special place.

Made of water, land, and space.

Many things we can't replace,

That's what makes them special.

Water's something I can drink,

Water fills my kitchen sink,

Freeze it for a skating rink!

Water's very special.

Trees that stand in forests tall

Shelter creatures large and small;

Plant some new trees as they fall;

Trees are very special.

People living everywhere

Love to breathe in fresh, clean air;

Keep it clean, and be aware,

Air is very special.

(poem taken from Macmillan/McGraw Hill text, Living and Growing)

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Kindergarten - Science Lesson 16 - Conservation

Objectives

Review: resources are things from nature that people use.

Understand that conserving means not to waste.

Identify ways to conserve and protect our resources.

Materials

Copy for each child - Plans to Save the Earth sheet (see following page)

Writing paper (see following page)

Chart paper or chalkboard

Markers or chalk

Procedure

Ask: Who remembers what resources are? (things from nature that people use) Say: Who can name some resources? (trees, water, air, soil, sunlight) Firm up if necessary.

Explain to children that they have learned about natural resources and how people use these resources. Point out that to make these resources available for the people today and for those people who live after us, it is important for all of us to take care of the resources that we have. Taking care of our resources means not wasting them and not making them dirty.

Say: Listen to this word: conserve. Say that word with me, everyone, conserve. Say: to conserve means not to waste. Ask: What does conserve mean? (not to waste). Firm up. Say: It is up to all of us on earth to conserve our resources. Let's think of some ways we can conserve our resources. Let's start with the natural resource water. Help me list some ways we can conserve water. (List responses on chalkboard or chart paper.) Guide children to realize that turning the water off when not using it will conserve water. Ask: How can we conserve trees? (Don't cut down too many, plant new ones to replace ones cut down.) Ask: How can we conserve air? (by not making it dirty with exhaust smoke from cars) Ask: How can we conserve soil? (by not throwing trash and garbage on the ground)

Give each student a copy of the sheet Plans to Save the Earth. Read the words around the earth for the children. Direct them to color the picture blue and green for water and land. Cut the circle out when coloring is complete. Give each student a copy of handwriting paper. Allow children to dictate their thoughts on how they can help the earth. Write the children's response for them on the lines. Children complete the paper by cutting the handwriting paper on the dark lines and gluing the earth paper onto the handwriting paper.

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Kindergarten - Science Lesson 16 - Conservation

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Kindergarten - Science Lesson 16 - Conservation

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Kindergarten - Science Lesson 17 - Conservation

Objectives

Review that to conserve means not to waste.

Understand that to recycle means to use again.

Identify items that can be recycled.

Procedure

Review with the children what resources are and what it means to conserve. Refer to previous lessons. Ask: Who is responsible for keeping the earth clean? (It is everyone's responsibility.) Ask: Why do we need to keep the earth clean? (so we will continue to have use of our natural resources; so living things will have a place to live)

Say: We have learned that to conserve means not to waste. One good way to waste less is to recycle. Say: Listen to this word again: recycle. Say that word with me, everyone, recycle. Say: to recycle means to use again. Ask: What does recycle mean? (to use again) Firm up. Say: Recycling means using things over and over again instead of throwing them away. Lots of families already recycle clothing: when one child grows up and gets too big for a shirt or pair of pants, then the clothes are passed on to a smaller child to be worn again. Has that ever happened in your family? (Discuss.) Say: Clothes are not the only things that can be recycled. Paper, cans, glass, and plastic are some of the other things that can be recycled. Instead of throwing those items in the garbage can, we can take them to recycling centers to be used again. (Discuss recycling programs that are available in the city.) Share with the children the following information concerning how items are recycled. (This information is from What Your Kindergartner Need to Know, E.D. Hirsch, Jr., and John Holdren.)

Paper: Factories can recycle newspapers and lots of other kinds of paper with writing on it. They grind it up and make it into new paper.

Cans: Factories can recycle most metal cans. They clean them and melt them and use them to make new cans. One kind of can is made of aluminum, like the cans that soda comes in. The other cans are often called tin cans: these hold fruits and vegetables, dog food and

cat food, beans and spaghetti with sauce, and lots more.

Glass: Factories recycle glass jars and bottles. They wash them, then grind them up and use them to make new glass.

Plastic: Factories recycle plastic, like milk jugs and soda bottles. They melt the plastic and reshape it into other things, like chairs and picnic tables.

 

Conclude these lessons by stressing the importance of cleaning up messes and helping to keep the school grounds clean throughout the year. Refer to these lessons as appropriate during cleanup times, outside recess play, or walks around the school. Reinforce that it is the responsibility of everyone, young and old, to keep our earth clean.

Teach children the following song as a wrap-up to the unit on conservation.









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Kindergarten - Science Lesson 17 - Conservation

We've Got The Whole World In Our Hands

Sing to the tune of "He's Got the Whole World in His Hands."

We've got the whole world in our hands.
[Extend hands forward each time "in our hands" is repeated.]

We've got the whole, wide world in our hands.

We've for the whole world in our hands.

We've got the whole world in our hands.

We've got to reduce all our trash.
[Push hand down each time "reduce" is repeated.]

We've got to reduce all our trash.

We've got to reduce all our trash.

We've got to take care of our world.
[Hug self and move upper body back and forth.]

We've got to reuse all we can.
[Extend palms with finger pointing up. Move hands back and forth.]

We've got to reuse all we can.

We've got to reuse all we can.

We've got to take care of our world.
[Hug self and move upper body back and forth.]

We've got to recycle all we can.
[Circle right hand in front of body.]

We've got to recycle all we can.

We've got to recycle all we can.

We've got to take care of our world.
[Hug self and move upper body back and forth.]

Jane Walker and Lori Bruce

Hubbard Elementary

Forsyth, GA

From The Mailbox magazine

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Kindergarten - Science Lesson 17 - Conservation

>Suggested Follow-Up Activities for the Conservation Unit

1. Read and enjoy any of the books listed at the beginning of the Conservation Unit that you may not yet have read.

2. Take children on a field trip to a recycling center in the community or invite a worker from the recycling center to speak to your class about the process of recycling. Start a recycling program in your classroom or in your school. Have children graph the items collected on the following sheet My Recyclable Record.

3. Play a Trash Relay game to reinforce the importance of putting litter in its place.



Trash Relay Game

Form three or four equal-numbered teams. Place a bag of trash items (empty cereal boxes, plastic containers, milk cartons, etc.) in front of each line and an empty bag at the end of each line. Put the same number of trash items in each bag as there are team members. Tell the first student in each row to take a trash item when the signal to begin is given. Have them pass the trash overhead to the person behind them. The other team members pass the item in the same manner. When it reaches the last person in line, he drops the trash into the bag behind him and runs up to the front of the line. There he begins passing another piece of trash. Play continues until one team has passed back all of its trash.



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Kindergarten - Science Lesson 17 - Conservation