BCP DRAFT LIT 23



Baltimore Curriculum Project Draft Lessons

Introductory Notes

These lessons generally follow the grade-by-grade topics in the Core Knowledge Sequence, but they have been developed independent of the Core Knowledge Foundation. While the Core Knowledge Foundation encourages the development and sharing of lessons based on the Core Knowledge Sequence, it does not endorse any one set of lesson plans as the best or only way that the knowledge in the Sequence should be taught.

You may feel free to download and distribute these lessons, but please note that they are currently in DRAFT form. At this time the draft lessons on this web site do NOT have accompanying graphics, such as maps or cut-out patterns. Graphics will be added to this site later.

In participating BCP schools, these lessons are used in conjunction with the Direct Instruction skills programs in reading, language, and math. If you use or adapt these lessons, keep in mind that they are meant to address content and the application of skills. You will need to use other materials to ensure that children master skills in reading, language, and math.

Kindergarten - Literature - October Overview

The literature lessons for October include sayings and phrases, poetry (nursery rhymes) and three folktales. The lessons are not sequential in presentation and may be taught in any desired order.

The following lists of books are excellent sources of Mother Goose Rhymes.

Arnold, Tedd. Mother Goose's Words Of Wit and Wisdom: A Book of Months. New York: Dial, 1990.

Briggs, Raymond. The Mother Goose Treasury. New York: Putnam, 1966.

Caldecott, Randolph. Sing a Song of Sixpence. New York: Barron, 1988 (reprint of 1888 edition).

dePaola, Tomie. Tomie dePaola's Mother Goose. New York: Putnam, 1985.

Larrick, Nancy. Songs From Mother Goose. New York: HarperCollins, 1989.

Oxenbury, Helen. The Helen Oxenbury Nursery Rhyme Book. New York: Morrow, 1987.

Tripp, Wallace. Granfa' Grig Had a Pig and Other Rhymes Without Reason from Mother Goose.

Boston: Little, Brown, 1976.

Wildsmith, Brian. Brian Wildsmith's Mother Goose. New York: Watts, 1964.

For fun and humor the following books are worth a look. They take the familiar nursery rhymes and put an unusual twist on them. It may be fun to read some of these to your students once they become familiar with the original rhymes.

Gander, Father (Larche, Douglas). Father Gander Nursery Rhymes. Santa Barbara: Advocacy Press, 1985.

Lansky, Bruce. The New Adventures of Mother Goose, Gentle Rhymes for Happy Times. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1993.



BCP DRAFT LIT 24

Kindergarten - Literature - Sayings and Phrases

Objectives

Develop new vocabulary through listening.

Listen to comprehend and to obtain information.

Procedure

The sayings for the month of October continue to build on those studied in September as guidelines for establishing good school habits. It is worthwhile to revisit those sayings again from September: A place for everything and everything in its place, and Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.

Where there's a will, there's a way.

Say: This saying means if you want to do something badly enough, you'll find a way to do it. Ask the children if they can recall a time when they really wanted to be able to do something, perhaps roller skate, or ride a bike. Ask if they were able to accomplish the task on the first try.

Discuss how the task was accomplished by sticking with the activity until it was mastered. Ask: If you really didn't want to learn how to skate, would you have kept at it? The answer is probably not. But where there is a will to accomplish something, you will find the way to make it happen!

Practice makes perfect.

Say: People use this saying to mean that doing something over and over makes you good at it. Say: This saying is like Where there's a will, there's a way. When you were learning how to skate, it may have taken you several tries just to stand up. You may have fallen down many times before you were able to move on your skates. But if you kept practicing at standing up and then at moving your feet, you finally learned how to skate. You see if you had not practiced skating, you never would have become a skater!

Relate both sayings to school and learning habits by giving examples that apply to current skill topics in the classroom.

BCP DRAFT LIT 25

Kindergarten - Literature -Nursery Rhymes

Objectives

Attend to the reading of the nursery rhymes.

Recite the rhymes through repetitive readings.

Procedure

Read the following nursery rhymes with the children several times. Develop any vocabulary that may be unknown to the children. Invite them to join in with the readings as they gain familiarity with the verses.

Little Bo Peep

Little Bo Peep has lost her sheep,

And can't tell where to find them;

Leave them alone, and they'll come home,

Wagging their tails behind them.

Little Boy Blue

Little Boy Blue,

Come blow your horn,

The sheep's in the meadow,

The cow's in the corn;

But where is the boy

Who looks after the sheep?

He's under a haystack,

Fast asleep.

Little Jack Horner

Little Jack Horner

Sat in a corner.

Eating his Christmas pie;

He put in his thumb,

And pulled out a plum,

And said, "What a good boy am I!"

Little Miss Muffet

Little Miss Muffet

Sat on a tuffet,

Eating her curds and whey;

Along came a spider,

Who sat down beside her

And frightened Miss Muffet away.





BCP DRAFT LIT 26

Kindergarten - Literature -Nursery Rhymes

Suggested Follow Up Activities

After the children have become familiar with the nursery rhymes in their original form, it may be fun to read the following variations of the rhymes. Compare and contrast the different versions.

Little Miss Muffet

Little Miss Muffet

sat on a tuffet,

licking an ice-cream cone.

Along came a spider,

who dangled beside her -

she told him to go get his own.

Bruce Lansky

Ms. Muffet & Friend

Little Ms. Mufffet sat on a tuffet,

Eating her curds and whey.

Along came a spider and sat down beside her,

And she put it in the garden to catch insects.

Father Gander

Little Bo Peep

Little Bo Peep throws her clothes in a heap

which makes her room one giant mess.

And when she wakes up, she calls for her pup

to hunt through the heap for her dress.

Bruce Lansky

Bo Peep & Joe Peep

Little Bo Peep has lost her sheep

And doesn't know where to find them.

Leave them alone, and they'll come home,

Wagging their tails behind them.

Little Joe Peep has lost his sheep And doesn't know where to find them.

Let them learn, and they'll return,

Wagging their tails behind them

Father Gander

Little Boy Blue

Little Boy Blue,

stop blowing your horn.

You'll wake up the neighbors;

it's two in the morn!

You've got to be quiet

so people can sleep.

Get under your covers

and start counting sheep.

Bruce Lansky

Little Boy Blue & Little Girl Green

Little Boy Blue, come blow your horn.

The sheep's in the meadow, the cow's in the corn.

But where is the boy who looks after the sheep?

He's under the haystack, fast asleep.

Little Girl Green, come sound the alarm.

The fox in the nest and the chickens he'll harm.

But where is the girl who tends to the nest?

She's up in the hayloft, taking a rest.

Father Gander





BCP DRAFT LIT 27

Kindergarten - Literature - Nursery Rhymes

Objectives

Attend to the reading of the nursery rhymes.

Recite the rhymes through repetitive readings.

Procedure

Read the following nursery rhymes with the children several times. Develop any vocabulary that may be unknown to the children. Invite them to join in with the readings as they gain familiarity with the verses. Reread and enjoy any nursery rhymes previously learned by the children. Invite them to suggest "old" rhymes to repeat.

Diddle, Diddle, Dumpling

Diddle, diddle, dumpling, my son John,

Went to bed with his stockings on;

One shoe off, and one shoe on,

Diddle, diddle, dumpling, my son John.

Old King Cole

Old King Cole

Was a merry old soul,

And a merry old soul was he;

He called for his pipe,

And he called for his bowl,

And he called for his fiddlers three.

Seesaw, Margery Daw

See-Saw, Margery Daw

Jenny shall have a new master;

She shall have but a penny a day,

Because she can't work any faster.

Pat-a-Cake

Pat-a-cake, pat-a-cake, baker's man.

Bake me a cake, as fast as you can.

Pat it and prick it and mark it with a "B",

And put it in the oven for baby and me.

(Teach children to clap hands with a friend at the underlined words. Explain that by clapping on those words they are clapping out the rhythm of the verse.)











BCP DRAFT LIT 28

Kindergarten - Literature - Nursery Rhymes

Suggested Follow Up Activity

After the children have become familiar with the nursery rhymes in their original form, it may be fun to read the following variations of the rhymes. Compare and contrast the different versions.

Diddle Diddle, Dumpling, My Girl June

Diddle diddle, dumpling, my girl June,

eats her lunch without a spoon.She's a mess from head to toe-

so in the bathtub she must go.

Bruce Lansky

Diddle Diddle, Dumpling, My Son Scooter

Diddle diddle, dumpling, my son Scooter,

played around with my computer.

He pressed the buttons, he hit the keys,

and now it only prints Chinese.

Bruce Lansky

Pat a Cake

Pat a cake, pat a cake, baker Sue,

bake me a cake that says, "I love you."

I've saved up my money; I'm ready to pay-

I'll give it to Mommy on Valentine's Day.

Bruce Lansky

Pat a Pie

Pat a pie, pat a pie, baker Dan,

bake me a pizza as fast as you can.

Knead it, and roll it, and spread on the cheese.

Then sprinkle on pepper; I'll try not tosneeze.

Virginia Kroll



BCP DRAFT LIT 29

Kindergarten -Literature - The Little Red Hen

Objectives

Follow along with the oral reading of The Little Red Hen.

Dramatize the retelling of The Little Red Hen.

Sequence the events in The Little Red Hen.

Illustrate a booklet retelling the events in The Little Red Hen.

Participate in cooking activity.

Suggested Titles

Zemach, M. The Little Red Hen. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1983.

A Big Book version of The Little Red Hen is available through Rigby (1985).

Materials

The Little Red Hen

Copies of the following sheets so that each student can illustrate each step on one bread page

These could be run on brown construction paper for a "bread" look.

Supplies to make bread (It is suggested you use frozen dough or white or whole wheat bread mix found with the muffin mixes in the grocery store. Of course you could use your own homemade version if you are so motivated!)

Paper plates and craft sticks, or paper grocery bags to be made into character masks (optional)

Procedure

Read aloud your favorite version of The Little Red Hen. After you've read it with expression, perhaps changing your voice inflection for the different animals, let the children help you reread it. Have them respond to the "Not I" parts, or divide the class into cat, dog, and pig groups (or whatever animals are in the version you have read), and let them respond, in order, to their "Not I" parts. Masks made out of paper plates attached to craft sticks or made out of paper grocery bags will turn the rereading into a dramatic presentation that is fun.

Following the dramatization of the story, call children to the chalkboard area of your room. Put the numbers one through five on the board and have the children recall the planting, caring for, harvesting, taking to the mill, and baking steps in the story while you write them on the board. Have students return to their seats and pass out the duplicated pages for making a sequence booklet. Assist students in writing one word pages sequencing the events in the story. (Example: page 1 students copy from board "plant," page 2 students write "care," page 3 "harvest," page 4 "mill," and page 5 "bake.") Children should illustrate each page and decorate the cover. Staple completed booklets together.

Discuss how working together allows work to get done in a timely manner. Ask students to wash their hands and prepare themselves to work together to cook bread for the class. Follow directions on bread mix allowing students to help in preparation as appropriate.

BCP DRAFT LIT 30

Kindergarten - Literature - Little Red Riding Hood

Objectives

Use oral language to relate experiences of Little Red Riding Hood.

Participate in a discussion of the setting in which the story takes place.

Participate in a discussion concerning "talking to strangers" and "minding your parents"

as they pertain to the story.

Review the five senses studied in science lessons as they pertain to the wolf.

Illustrate their favorite part of the story in a match book. (Directions follow this lesson.)

Suggested Titles

Goodall, J., retold by. Little Red Riding Hood. New York: Macmillan, 1988.

Grimm, Brothers. Little Red Riding Hood, retold by Trina Schart Hyman. New York: Holiday House, 1983.

Marshall, James, retold by. Little Red Riding Hood. New York: Dial, 1987.

Perrault, Charles. Little Red Riding Hood. Mankato, Minnesota: Creative Education, 1983.

Materials

Your favorite version of Little Red Riding Hood

White drawing paper

Crayons

Scrap paper (optional)

Procedure

Read aloud your favorite version of Little Red Riding Hood. After you've read the story, invite the children to participate in a discussion about Red Riding Hood's adventure. Prompt with questions such as: Where was Little Red Riding Hood going? Why was she going there? Ask pointed, brief questions to develop the students' oral language. Lead the discussion into the setting of the story. Ask: Where does the story take place? (in the woods) What are some things that are found in the woods? Ask: Would this story be different if it took place in the city? (yes) How might it be different? (The wolf wouldn't live in the city.) Conclude the discussion by talking about the lessons the author wanted us to learn from reading this story. Discuss the lessons of not talking to strangers and of minding your parents. Conclude that Red Riding Hood wouldn't have had her troubles if she had remembered those important lessons.

Refer to and reread the section in the story where Red Riding Hood talks with the wolf about his physical appearance. Read, "Oh, Grandmother what big ears you have!" Ask: Who remembers what our ears help us do? (hear) Say: That's right! Read from the book, "The better to hear you with, my dear." Read, "And Grandmother, what big eyes you have!" Ask: What do our eyes help us do? (see) Say: That's right! Read from the book, "The better to see you with, my dear!" Continue reading and questioning through five senses. Check for accurate recall of information learned in previous science lessons.

Upon completion of the discussion, send children back to their seats. Ask them to spend a few quiet moments thinking about the story. While they are thinking, pass out the materials needed to create the book. After a few moments ask the children to tell their favorite part of the story.



BCP DRAFT LIT 31

Kindergarten - Literature - Little Red Riding Hood

Allow several children to respond. Discuss how different people will have favorite parts of the story. Acknowledge all answers and assure children there are no "wrong" answers. Explain to the children they will be drawing their favorite part of the story. Assist them in creating their books; encourage those children who are ready to use letters and words in their drawing.

Suggested Follow up

Read Little Red Riding Hood A Newfangled Prairie Tale, by Lisa Campbell Ernst (Simon & Schuster, 1995). The setting of this version is on a prairie. Compare this version to the original and discuss how the setting is changed.

Directions For Match Book

1. Fold a sheet of white drawing paper (8 by 11)

in half, but fold it so that one side is one inch

longer than the other side.













2. Fold the one inch tab over the short

side forming an envelope-like fold.









3. Cut the book in half making two match books.

4. Glue a match book onto another sheet of 8

by 11 white drawing paper.

5. Cut the top edges of the full sheet of paper to

form Red Riding Hood's Hood.













6. Children will decorate the outside of the match book to look like Little Red Riding Hood. On the inside of the match book they will illustrate their favorite part of the story.

BCP DRAFT LIT 32

Kindergarten - Literature - Cinderella

Objectives

Listen to the reading of Cinderella.

Use oral language to relate Cinderella's experiences.

Participate in discussion comparing settings of Little Red Riding Hood and Cinderella.

Retell Cinderella with pictures representing beginning, middle and end of the story.

Suggested Titles

Ehrlich, A., retold by. Cinderella. New York: Dial, 1985.

Galdone, Paul, retold by. Cinderella. New York: McGraw Hill, 1978.

Karlin, Barbara, retold by. Cinderella. Boston: Little, Brown, 1989.

Perrault, Charles. Cinderella, retold by Marcia Brown. New York: Scribner's, 1954.

Materials

One of the versions of Cinderella

One piece of drawing paper for each student

Procedure

Read aloud your favorite version of Cinderella. After you have read the story, invite the children to participate in a discussion about Cinderella's adventure. Prompt with questions that will develop the children's oral language. Be sure to call on a variety of children to respond to questions such as: How did Cinderella get her name? Why did Cinderella want to go to the ball?

Lead the discussion into the setting of the story. Ask: Where does the story take place? (at Cinderella's house; at the Palace) Ask: Are these the same places where the story of Little Red Riding Hood took place? Compare the differences in the settings of the two stories.

The children will complete a writing activity retelling the story through pictures. It is imperative that the teacher model how to do this activity prior to assigning the activity to the children. Ask: Who can tell me what happened first in the story? (Cinderella had to do all the chores of the household for her stepmother and stepsister.) Say: In the middle of the story Cinderella wanted to go to the ball. How was she able to go to the ball? (A fairy godmother helped her with her dress.) Say: At the end of the story something special happened to Cinderella. Who remembers how the story ends? (The Prince finds Cinderella can wear the shoe he found at the ball. The Prince and Cinderella get married.) Say: We have just retold the story of Cinderella. All stories have a beginning, a middle, and an end. When we can remember all three parts of the story, we have retold it.

Give each child a piece of white drawing paper. Instruct them to fold the sheet into quarters like a greeting card. They should write Cinderella on the front side; on the three remaining sides, they draw illustrations to represent the beginning, middle, and end of the story. Assist children through the activity. You may wish to complete the activity as a whole group, coaching them through each page of the booklet to ensure each child comprehends beginning, middle, and end, rather than allowing the children to complete the whole booklet independently.