BCP DRAFT MUSIC 6



Baltimore Curriculum Project Draft Lessons

Introductory Notes

These lessons generally follow the grade-by-grade topics in the Core Knowledge Sequence, but they have been developed independent of the Core Knowledge Foundation. While the Core Knowledge Foundation encourages the development and sharing of lessons based on the Core Knowledge Sequence, it does not endorse any one set of lesson plans as the best or only way that the knowledge in the Sequence should be taught.

You may feel free to download and distribute these lessons, but please note that they are currently in DRAFT form. At this time the draft lessons on this web site do NOT have accompanying graphics, such as maps or cut-out patterns. Graphics will be added to this site later.

In participating BCP schools, these lessons are used in conjunction with the Direct Instruction skills programs in reading, language, and math. If you use or adapt these lessons, keep in mind that they are meant to address content and the application of skills. You will need to use other materials to ensure that children master skills in reading, language, and math.

Kindergarten - Music - Lesson 4

Objectives

Identify a guitar, a piano, and a trumpet by sight and sound.

Identify a flute, a drum, and a violin by sight and sound.

Materials

Pictures of a guitar, a trumpet, and a piano (see the following sheet)

Pictures of a flute, a drum and a violin (see the following sheet)

Recordings of instrumental music

Procedure

If you have access to recordings that feature the instruments named above, play them for your students and point out the sound of the specific instruments. Use the following sheet of instrument cards to show the instrument as it is being played in the recording. The cards could be enlarged, colored and cut apart. Review with children the science lesson about the sense of hearing and how sound is received by the ears. Recall the rattles made during that science lesson and how shaking the rattle produced sound. Explain that a guitar makes sound when someone plucks or strums the strings. Ask: How does a piano make sound? (Someone presses the keys.) Ask: How does a trumpet make sound? (Someone blows air into it and presses the keys.) Continue questioning of how sound is produced by a flute, a drum, and a violin. Allow time for children to gain familiarity with the sight and sound of each instrument through repetitive playing of selected recordings.

Suggested Follow Up Activity

Make classroom instruments to further the students' exploration of sound and music. The following books are excellent sources.

Hayes, Phyllis. Musical Instruments You Can Make. New York: Franklin Watts, 1981.

McLean, Margaret. Make Your Own Musical Instrument. Minneapolis: Lerner, 1988.

Oates, Eddie Herschel. Making Music 6 Instruments You Can Create. New York: HarperCollins, 1995.

Palmer, Hap. Homemade Band. New York: Crown, 1991.

Wiseman, Ann. Making Musical Things: Improvised Instruments. New York: Scribner, 1979.

BCP DRAFT MUSIC 7

Kindergarten - Music - Lesson 5

Objectives

Develop listening skills through repetitive singing.

Develop an appreciation of melody.

Procedure

Say: The song I want to sing with you today is a very quiet song. It is a song that is often sung to a baby to help the child fall asleep. Ask: Why do you think this will be a quiet song? Discuss the differences in loud and quiet sounds by referring to the science lessons on sense of sound.

Sing the song "Hush, Little Baby."

Hush, little baby, don't say a word,

Papa's gonna buy you a mocking bird.

And if that mocking bird won't sing,

Papa's gonna buy you a diamond ring.

And if that diamond ring turns to brass,

Papa's gonna buy you a looking glass.

And if that looking glass gets broke,

Papa's gonna buy you a billy goat.

And if that billy goat won't pull,

Papa's gonna buy you a cart and bull.

And if that cart and bull turn over,

Papa's gonna buy you a dog named Rover.

And if that dog named Rover won't bark,

Papa's gonna buy you a horse and cart.

And if that horse and cart fall down,

You'll still be the sweetest little baby in town.

Suggested Follow Up Activity

As a follow up to the singing of the song, read the children the book Hush, Little Baby, illustrated by Aliki (Prentice-Hall, 1968).

BCP DRAFT MUSIC 8

Kindergarten - Music - Lesson 6

Objectives

Develop listening skills through repetitive singing.

Develop an appreciation of melody.

Procedure

Say: Today's song is about a famous bridge in London, England. In the song we will sing about the bridge falling down and the ways it might be fixed. Ask: Does anyone have any ideas how a bridge could be fixed if it was falling down? Allow time for children to share creative responses.

Sing the song London Bridge Is Falling Down. Teach the words as you show the children the actions of the song by creating the bridge with two children and capturing one student as he or she passes through the bridge on the words my fair lady.

London Bridge Is Falling Down

London Bridge is falling down,

Falling down, falling down,

London Bridge is falling down,

My fair lady.

How shall we build it up again,

Up again, up again,

How shall we build it up again,

My fair lady?

Build it up with iron bars,

Iron bars, iron bars,

Build it up with iron bars,

My fair lady.

Iron bars will bend and bow,

Bend and bow, bend and bow,

Iron bars will bend and bow,

My fair lady.

Build it up with wood and clay . . .

Wood and clay will wash away . . .

Build it up with silver and gold . . .

Silver and gold will be stolen away . . .

[Repeat first verse.]

BCP DRAFT MUSIC 9

Kindergarten - Music - Lesson 7

Objectives

Develop listening skills through repetitive singing.

Develop an appreciation of melody.

Develop an awareness of rhyming words.

Procedure

Say: Today we are going to sing a counting song. This song will be full of words that rhyme. Listen carefully to the words so we can talk about how the words rhyme when we finish the song. Sing "This Old Man."

This Old Man

This old man, he played one,

He played knick-knack on my thumb,

With a knick-knack, paddy-wack, give a dog a bone,

This old man came rolling home.

This old man, he played two,

He played knick-knack on my shoe . . .

This old man, he played three,

He played knick-knack on my knee . . .

This old man, he played four,

He played knick-knack on my door . . .

This old man, he played five,

He played knick-knack on my hive . . .

This old man, he played six,

He played knick-knack on my sticks . . .

This old man, he played seven,

He played knick-knack up in heaven . . .

This old man, he played eight,

He played knick-knack on my gate . . .

This old man, he played nine,

He played knick-knack on my spine . . .

This old man, he played ten,

He played knick-knack over again . . .

BCP DRAFT MUSIC 10

Kindergarten - Music - Lesson 7

Following the singing of the song be sure to discuss the words that rhyme. Repeat the song, allowing children the opportunity to sing the word that rhymes with each number word without teacher assistance.

Suggested Follow Up Activity

Read the book This Old Man: The Counting Song illustrated by Robin M. Koontz (Putnam, 1988). The book includes suggestions for playing the music and is very cleverly illustrated.