BCP DRAFT MUS 1

Baltimore Curriculum Project Draft Lessons

Introductory Notes

These lessons generally follow the grade-by-grade topics in the Core Knowledge Sequence, but they have been developed independent of the Core Knowledge Foundation. While the Core Knowledge Foundation encourages the development and sharing of lessons based on the Core Knowledge Sequence, it does not endorse any one set of lesson plans as the best or only way that the knowledge in the Sequence should be taught.

You may feel free to download and distribute these lessons, but please note that they are currently in DRAFT form. At this time the draft lessons on this web site do NOT have accompanying graphics, such as maps or cut-out patterns. Graphics will be added to this site later.

In participating BCP schools, these lessons are used in conjunction with the Direct Instruction skills programs in reading, language, and math. If you use or adapt these lessons, keep in mind that they are meant to address content and the application of skills. You will need to use other materials to ensure that children master skills in reading, language, and math.

 

Kindergarten - Music - Overview

The goals of early music instruction are to develop an interest in and love of music; to help children develop the ability to express themselves musically; to develop sensitivity to musical beauty and basic understanding of musical form.

The lessons in the music section are not sequential and may be taught in any order. You are encouraged to play various kinds of music often and repeatedly. Music can be played for enjoyment, to accompany activities, to inspire creative movement, etc.

Suggested Titles

Drews, Helen. My First Music Book. New York: Dorling Kindersley, 1993.

Hart, Avery and Mantell, Paul. Kids Make Music! Charlotte, Vermont: Williamson Publishing, 1993.

Hayes, Phyllis. Musical Instruments You Can Make. New York: Franklin Watts, 1981.

Lillegard, Dee. An Introduction to Musical Instruments. Chicago: Children's Press, 1988.

McLean, Margaret. Make Your Own Musical Instrument. Minneapolis: Lerner, 1988.

Oates, Eddie Herschel. Making Music 6 Instruments You Can Create. New York: HarperCollins, 1995.

Palmer, Hap. Homemade Band. New York: Crown, 1991.

Pettigrew, Mark. Music and Sound. New York: Gloucester, 1987.

Van Kampen, Vlasta. Orchestranimals.New York: Scholastic, 1990.

Wiseman, Ann. Making Musical Things: Improvised Instruments. New York: Scribner, 1979.

Recordings that collect favorite songs for children:

Disney's Children's Favorites, vols 1-4 (Disney Songtapes)

Family Folk Festival: A Multi-cultural Sing-Along (Music for Little People)

Shake It to the One That You Love the Best: Play Songs and Lullabies from Black Musical Traditions by Cheryl Warren Mattox ( Warren-Mattox Productions, 1989)

Wee Sing Sing-Alongs series (Price Stern Sloan)

BCP DRAFT MUS 2

Kindergarten - Music - Lesson 1

Objectives

Develop listening skills through repetitive singing.

Develop an appreciation of melody.

Procedure

Say: Raise your hand if you have been on a bus before. Elicit from these children sounds the bus makes as it drives its route. Compare sounds from a school bus and those of a city bus. Discuss how city buses charge a fare to ride the bus and the school bus does not collect a fare. Ask children if they can think of any reasons why there is no charge to ride the school bus. Discuss that only school children can ride the school bus. Compare the ride of a bus to the ride of a car or taxi. How are they alike; how are they different?

Ask: Who can show with me with their hands and arms how the wheels of the bus move? Allow for creative responses. Ask: Who can show me how the window wipers move on a bus?

Again allow for responses from several children.

Say: Today we are going to learn a song that describes the sounds a bus makes as it drives. I'm going to show you some hand motions to use to help make our song seem more like a bus ride. Watch me carefully and join in!

Sing "The Wheels On the Bus." Note hand motions in parentheses at the end of each verse. Sing the song through several times so children can gain familiarity with the movements and words.

"The Wheels on the Bus"

The wheels on the bus go round and round, round and round, round and round.

The wheels on the bus go round and round, all around the town. (Move arms round and round.)

The windows on the bus go up and down;...(Put arms up and down.)

The wipers on the bus go swish, swish, swish;...(Make fingers go side to side like windshield wipers.)

The people on the bus hop on and off;...(Have students hop forward and backward.)

The driver on the bus says move on back;...(Pretend to be the driver and move arms to side and back.)

The horn on the bus goes beep, beep, beep;...(Pretend to beep horn.)

The doors on the bus go open and shut;...(Use arms to mimic doors opening and shutting.)

The babies on the bus go waa, waa, waa;...(Pretend to cry.)

The moms on the bus go sh, sh, sh;...(Use finger to mouth movement.)

BCP DRAFT MUSIC 3

Kindergarten - Music - Lesson 1

The money on the bus goes ching, ching, ching;...(Use hand and pretend to put money in money collector.)

BCP DRAFT MUS 4

Kindergarten -Music- Lesson 2

Objectives

Develop listening skills through repetitive singing.

Develop an appreciation of melody.

Procedure

Say: Remember the song "The Wheels On the Bus"? Who can remember what that song was all about? Allow children time to respond. Be sure that the children recall the song described how a bus moves and the sound the bus makes as it drives its route. Say: A bus is just one way people can travel from one place to another. Ask: Who can think of other ways people can get from one place to another? Help children to brainstorm by prompting for new responses such as walking, airplanes, trains, cars, horseback, boats, skates, bikes.

Say: Today we are going to learn a song about riding in a boat. It is called "Row, Row, Row, Your Boat." Say: This is a song about a little row boat, not a big motor boat. Discuss the differences. Say: This boat is traveling in a gentle little stream on a pretty day. Ask: How might a boat ride change on a windy, stormy day? Discuss.

Sing the song several times and encourage children to join in. Use hand motions to imitate rowing motion.

"Row, Row, Row Your Boat"

Row, row, row, your boat

Gently down the stream.

Merrily, merrily, merrily, merrily,

Life is but a dream.

BCP DRAFT MUS 5

Kindergarten - Music - Lesson 3

Objectives

Develop listening skills through repetitive singing.

Develop an appreciation of melody.

Procedure

Say: The song I want to sing with you today is a happy song. It's about feeling happy and showing others that you are happy. Watch me carefully! There are many hands and feet motions in this song!

Sing the song "If You're Happy and You Know It Clap Your Hands."

If you're happy and you know it clap your hands, If you're happy and you know it clap your hands, If you're happy and you know it and you really want to show it, If you're happy and you know it clap your hands. (Clap your hands after you sing the words clap your hands.)

If you're happy and you know it stomp your feet, If you're happy and you know it stomp your feet, If you're happy and you know it and you really want to show it, If you're happy and you know it stomp your feet. (Stomp your feet after you sing the words stomp your feet.)

If you're happy and you know it nod your head, If you're happy and you know it nod your head, If you're happy and you know it and you really want to show it, If you're happy and you know it nod your head. (Nod after you sing the words nod your head.)

If you're happy and you know it tap your toes, If you're happy and you know it tap your toes, If you're happy and you know it and you really want to show it, If you're happy and you know it tap your toes. (Tap toes after you sing the words tap your toes.)