BCP DRAFT SCI 1

Baltimore Curriculum Project Draft Lessons

Introductory Notes

These lessons generally follow the grade-by-grade topics in the Core Knowledge Sequence, but they have been developed independent of the Core Knowledge Foundation. While the Core Knowledge Foundation encourages the development and sharing of lessons based on the Core Knowledge Sequence, it does not endorse any one set of lesson plans as the best or only way that the knowledge in the Sequence should be taught.

You may feel free to download and distribute these lessons, but please note that they are currently in DRAFT form. At this time the draft lessons on this web site do NOT have accompanying graphics, such as maps or cut-out patterns. Graphics will be added to this site later.

In participating BCP schools, these lessons are used in conjunction with the Direct Instruction skills programs in reading, language, and math. If you use or adapt these lessons, keep in mind that they are meant to address content and the application of skills. You will need to use other materials to ensure that children master skills in reading, language, and math.

Kindergarten - Science- Overview

September science lessons deal with taking care of the body through cleanliness, rest, and healthy eating. The teacher can develop healthy habits at the beginning of the year and assist children in following procedures all year long that are developed in September. It is strongly suggested that the teacher request children wash their hands prior to any food consumption. Review proper ways to cover the mouth and nose when coughing and sneezing and to wash after sneezing and coughing. Provide opportunity to eat healthy foods at snack time. Emphasize the importance of rest and how the body requires time to 'recharge' if nap time is a part of your day.

Suggested Books

Berger, Melvyn. Germs Make Me Sick. New York: HarperCollins, 1985, 1995.

Carrick, Donald. Milk. New York: Greenwillow, 1985.

Caseley, Judith. Grandpa's Garden Lunch. New York: Greenwillow, 1990.

Cobb, Vicki. Brush, Comb, Scrub: Inventions to Keep You Clean. New York; HarperCollins, 1989, Harper Torphy, 1993.

dePaola, Tomie. Pancakes for Breakfast. San Diego: HBJ, 1978.

Ehlert, Lois. Growing Vegetable Soup. San Diego: HBJ, 1987.

Gross, Ruth Belov. What's On My Plate? New York: Macmillan, 1990.

Rice, Judith. Those Mean Nasty Dirty Disgusting but...Invisible Germs. Toys'n'Things Press, 1989.

BCP DRAFT SCI 2

Kindergarten - Science - Lesson 1 - The Human Body

Objectives

Recognize that the whole body is covered by skin.

Understand the importance of washing the skin as protection against germs.

Materials

Paper towels

Two peeled potatoes, soaking in water to prevent discoloration

Two paper plates

A book to read aloud about skin, germs, and cleanliness

Procedure

Read a book to the children that talks about skin, germs, and cleanliness. It is very important to keep our skin clean and healthy with soap and water. Say: We are going to do an experiment to see whether there is dirt on our hands right now. Probably every one of you washed your hands and face, and maybe even your whole bodies before coming to school today. You wash your hands every time you finish going to the bathroom and after you eat your meals. You may think your hands are clean enough.

Next, show the children the two peeled potatoes, drawing attention to their color. Dry the potatoes with a paper towel to absorb any excess water before passing them around. Pass one of the peeled potatoes among all of the children. Place it on a paper plate that you have labeled unwashed hands, then have the children take a good look at the potato and tell what they see. Have all the children wash their hands and then pass the second potato around. Place it on a paper plate that you have labeled washed hands. Have the children observe the difference between the potatoes at this point, and then compare the potatoes at several points later in the day. Invite them to talk about their observations, and write on the board anything that helps confirm the relationship between washing hands, cleanliness, and germs.

 

Music and Movement

As a review of the way the human body moves, teach the children the poem, "Head, Shoulders, Knees, and Toes." (The poem can be sung to the basic melody of "Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush" if the teacher has the time and inclination to teach the music to the children.)

Head, shoulders, knees, and toes.

Head, shoulders, knees, and toes.

Head, shoulders, knees, and toes,

As fast as I can.

Ears, tummy, hips, and shins.

Ears, tummy, hips, and shins.

Ears, tummy, hips, and shins,

As fast as I can.

First say (or sing) the words for the children, touching each body part as it is named. Next, have BCP DRAFT SCI 3

Kindergarten - Science - Lesson 1 - The Human Body

them join you. After they have done it a few times, speed it up so they will move faster in

reaching for the parts of the body they name. (You may want to teach the two verses separately, adding the second verse only after the children have caught on to the words and movements of the first.)

BCP DRAFT SCI 4

Kindergarten - Science - Lesson 2 - The Human Body

Objective

Identify ways to keep the body clean.

Materials

Toothpaste, soap

Toothbrush

Procedure

Tell the children that it is nice to be around people who are clean. Keeping your body, hands, face, and hair clean helps to keep away germs. Review with them that germs are tiny things we cannot see, but can make people sick. Germs get into our bodies and make us feel bad. Discuss with the class some of the ways we take care of our bodies, such as washing our hands and face with soap and water, brushing our teeth, etc. Demonstrate how to properly wash hands and brush teeth using real materials (show the children toothpaste, a toothbrush, soap, etc.) if possible.

Sing the following verses while using the hand and body movements (adding your own if you wish) to the tune of "Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush":

This is the way we brush our teeth (simulate brushing teeth)

Brush our teeth, brush our teeth.

This is the way we brush our teeth

To keep our bodies healthy.

This is the way we wash our hands... (simulate washing hands)

This is the way we exercise.... (do jumping jacks)

This is the way we take a nap... (tilt head, place on folded hands)

This is the way we eat good food... (simulate spooning food into mouth)

This is the way we wash our face... (simulate washing face)

This is the way we take a bath... (rub arms as if washing)

This is the way we wash our hair... (simulate washing hair)

BCP DRAFT SCI 5

Kindergarten - Science - Lesson 3 - The Human Body

Objective

Identify healthy foods.

Materials

Chart paper, markers

Procedure

Tell the children that eating good food helps bodies stay healthy. Good foods keep bodies growing and working. Make a web by writing "Foods We Like to Eat" in the middle and adding the children's favorite foods around the phrase.

Make a large chart on a piece of paper, showing four equal sections. Label the four columns of the chart with the words breads and cereals, fruits and vegetables, meat and fish, and dairy products. Discuss with the children the four categories.

Have the children cut pictures of food (including bread, cereal, fruits, vegetables, meat, fish, milk, cheese) from magazines. As you collect the pictures, have children identify the foods in the pictures. Then, redistribute the pictures, one to each child. Place the chart on the floor and invite children one at a time to place the picture on the chart under the appropriate label. Encourage them to tell why they placed the pictures where they did. Explain to the children that it is good to eat foods from the different food groups every day.

Snack

Materials

Ingredients for simple snacks - carrots, cucumbers, apples, etc.

Procedure

As you prepare a snack of vegetables and fruits, talk about the foods you are using--appearance, texture, and odor. You might mention the food group to which each belongs and talk about how the foods' appearance changes as you prepare them. Cut off the edible parts to use for the snack and save the inedible parts (end of carrot or cucumber, apple core, etc.) to use for printing in the art activity that follows.

Art Activity

Materials

Tempera paint

Sponges

Pie plates

Vegetable and fruit parts

Procedure

Use the inedible fruit and vegetable parts for printing. Press an inedible plant part, such as an apple core or a corn husk, into a tempera paint-soaked sponge in a pie pan and stamp the vegetable or fruit onto paper.

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Kindergarten - Science - Lesson 3 - The Human Body

Suggested Books

Carrick, Donald. Milk. New York: Greenwillow, 1985.

Caseley, Judith. Grandpa's Garden Lunch. New York: Greenwillow, 1990.

dePaola, Tomie. Pancakes for Breakfast. San Diego: HBJ, 1978.

Ehlert, Lois. Growing Vegetable Soup. San Diego: HBJ, 1987.

Gross, Ruth Belov. What's On My Plate? New York: Macmillan, 1990.

Hoban, Russell. Bread and Jam for Frances. New York: Harper, 1964.

Novak, Matt. Mr. Floop's Lunch. New York: Lothrop, 1989.

BCP DRAFT SCI 7

Kindergarten - Science - Lesson 4 - The Human Body

Objectives

Identify ways to exercise the body.

Illustrate exercise activites.

Materials

Drawing paper

Crayons

Procedure

Write the word exercise on the board. Tell the children that the word exercise means doing activities that keep our bodies in shape. When you play kickball, baseball, soccer, or basketball you are exercising. You are also exercising when you take a walk with a friend or run home after school. Ask the children to discuss their favorite types of exercises or activities and tell why they enjoy them. List their responses on the blackboard.

Have the children draw pictures of activities or exercises they like to do. Children may enjoy demonstrating for the class some activities they can do.

Music and Movement

Procedure

Have the children imitate the movements animals make.

Stretch like a cat - Start on your hands and knees with your back straight. Slowly raise your back up high and hold. Lower your back until it is straight.

Fly like a bird - Start with your hands at your sides. Slowly lift them up behind you as high as you can. Bend your head down. Hold, then relax in standing position.

Yawn like a lion - Kneel, sitting back on your feet with hands on your knees. Lean forward on your knees as you open your eyes and mouth very wide. Stick out your tongue as far as you can. Hold. Roar if you wish. Relax and sit back up.

Kneel like a camel - Kneel on the ground. Rest your right hand on your right heel, and your left hand on your left heel. Raise your chest up, bend your head back, and hold. Return to kneeling position and rest.

Sit like a frog - Sit on the floor with knees bent out and the bottoms of your feet touching each other (Indian style, but with your feet touching instead of ankles crossed). Grab hold of your feet and pull them in toward your body. Gently press your knees toward the floor. Keep your back straight and hold.

Relax like a jellyfish - Lie on the ground on your back. Close your eyes. Relax every part of your body. Pretend that you are made of jelly. Breathe in and out slowly for several minutes.