BCP DRAFT HIST 2

Baltimore Curriculum Project Draft Lessons

Introductory Notes

These lessons generally follow the grade-by-grade topics in the Core Knowledge Sequence, but they have been developed independent of the Core Knowledge Foundation. While the Core Knowledge Foundation encourages the development and sharing of lessons based on the Core Knowledge Sequence, it does not endorse any one set of lesson plans as the best or only way that the knowledge in the Sequence should be taught.

You may feel free to download and distribute these lessons, but please note that they are currently in DRAFT form. At this time the draft lessons on this web site do NOT have accompanying graphics, such as maps or cut-out patterns. Graphics will be added to this site later.

In participating BCP schools, these lessons are used in conjunction with the Direct Instruction skills programs in reading, language, and math. If you use or adapt these lessons, keep in mind that they are meant to address content and the application of skills. You will need to use other materials to ensure that children master skills in reading, language, and math.

Kindergarten - World Civilization - Lesson 2

Objectives

Identify, name, and locate the 7 continents.

Identify Asia as the largest continent.

Identify Australia as the smallest continent.

Identify North America as the continent where we live.

Identify South America as the neighboring continent to North America.

Materials

Classroom size world map

Procedure - 20 min.

Ask if anyone remembers the two different types of areas on the map (land and water). Have several students point out different areas of water on the map. Then ask several students to point out areas of land on the map. Review with the children that a continent is a large mass of land and that there are seven continents. Point them out on the map. Name the continents as you point to them. Have the children repeat the names with you.

Review the name and location of the continent of North America. Tell them that the continent on which we live is North America. Ask: Can anyone point to North America on the map of the world? (If the correct continent is not identified make sure to locate and name it for the children.) Tell the children that our neighboring continent is South America. South America is below North America. (Point to South America on the world map.) See if they can say it on their own.

Tell the children the smallest continent in the world is Australia. It is an island. (Define: not attached to any other land mass, water on all sides.) Tell the children the largest continent in the world is called Asia. Point it out on the map. Show the class on the map that Asia shares a land mass with another continent, Europe. Point out Europe on the map.

On the world map, move your finger or pointer straight down across the Mediterranean Sea to Africa. Identify Africa as the next continent you'll study. Tell the children it is a very large continent. Only Asia is larger.

Tell the children that the next continent is located at the bottom of the world. Demonstrate on the globe to make this point; locate and identify this continent as Antarctica.

 

Teach the children the Continental Clap (x over a word indicates a clap).

The Continental Clap

The continents are seven lands.

We can say them while we clap our hands.

x x

A - sia

x x x

Af - ri - ca

BCP DRAFT HIST 3

Kindergarten - World Civilization - Lesson 2

 

x x x x

North A - mer - I - ca

x x x x

South A - mer - I - ca

x x x

Ant - arc - ti - ca

x x

Eu - rope

x x

and Aus - tral - ia

Review the names and locations of the seven continents, the continent we live on, and the largest and smallest continent. Firm up if necessary.

BCP DRAFT HIST 4

Kindergarten - World Civilization - Lesson 3

Objective

Identify, name, and locate the 7 continents.

Identify Asia as the largest continent.

Identify Australia as the smallest continent.

Identify North America as the continent where we live.

Identify South America as the neighboring continent to North America.

Introduce North and South Poles.

Materials

Classroom size world map

Globe

Procedure - 15 min.

Review the names and locations of the seven continents. Point them out on the map and name the continents as you point. Have the children repeat the names with you. Ask the following questions: Can someone name the continent on which we live? (Have the child name and then locate North America on the map.) Can someone name and locate the largest continent? (Asia) Can someone name and locate the smallest continent? (Australia)

Do the Continental Clap with the children. (Remember the x over a word indicates a clap.)

The Continental Clap

The continents are seven lands.

We can say them while we clap our hands.

x x

A - sia

x x x

Af - ri - ca x x x x

North A - mer - I - ca

x x x x

South A - mer - I - ca

x x x

Ant - arc - ti - ca

x x

Eu - rope

x x

and Aus - tral - ia

Next, tell the children that there are special names for the top and bottom of the earth--they are called poles. Using a globe show the children that the top of the globe is called the North Pole. Next, point to the bottom of the globe and tell the children that this is called the South Pole.

Review the names and locations of the seven continents, the continent we live on, and the largest and smallest continent. Firm up if necessary.

BCP DRAFT HIST 5

Kindergarten - World Civilization - Lesson 4

Objectives

Identify and locate the continents on a map.

Order the continents according to size.

Materials

Classroom size world map

Globe

Each continent on a piece of paper (Cut in half the pages that have two continents on the same sheet. Mount each continent on a sheet of 8 x 11 paper. Color each continent a different color to make the continent itself clearly visible, and so that the students are not confused by only seeing the outlines. )

Procedure

Review with the children that the land on earth is broken up into seven big pieces; we call these pieces continents. Continents come in all shapes and sizes. Point out the difference between land and water on both the map and the globe. Ask if anyone can name the continent on which we live. Then go through and point to all of the continents, having the children repeat the name of each continent after you. Go through all the continents until the children begin to grasp the names. After the names and locations of the continents have been introduced, have the children guess which continent is the biggest and which is the smallest using both the globe and the map. Then go through the continents from largest to smallest a few times, pointing the continents out on the classroom world map as you name them.

Next, have the children sit on the floor in a circle. Spread out the pieces of paper with the continents on them and call on students to help you line up the continents in order from largest to smallest. Begin by asking if anyone remembers which continent is the largest, and continue until the continents are all lined up in order. Once this is completed, you may want to ask them questions about the order of the continents and their locations on the map. For example, ask if anyone remembers the name of the biggest continent. Then ask if anyone can show where Asia is on the map. Or, ask how many continents are bigger than North America, then ask what the names of those continents are. Do a few variations of these questions. Review the names of the continents and their location at the end of the lesson.

The continents should be backed on thicker paper and kept in a center area for the children to learn during center time.